• We report an early science discovery of the CO(1-0) emission line in the collisional ring galaxy, VII Zw466, using the Redshift Search Receiver instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano.The apparent molecular-to-atomic gas ratio either places the ISM of VII Zw466 in the HI-dominated regime or implies a large quantity of CO-dark molecular gas, given its high star formation rate. The molecular gas densities and star formation rate densities of VII Zw466 are consistent with the standard Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law even though we find this galaxy to be H2-deficient. The choice of CO-to-H2 conversion factors cannot explain the apparent H2 deficiency in its entirety. Hence, we find that the collisional ring galaxy, VII Zw466, is either largely deficient in both H2 and HI or contains a large mass of CO-dark gas. A low molecular gas fraction could be due to the enhancement of feedback processes from previous episodes of star formation as a result of the star-forming ISM being confined to the ring. We conclude that collisional ring galaxy formation is an extreme form of galaxy interaction that triggers a strong galactic-wide burst of star formation that may provide immediate negative feedback towards subsequent episodes of star formation---resulting in a short-lived star formation history or, at least, the appearance of a molecular gas deficit.
  • Epsilon Eridani is a nearby, young Sun-like star that hosts a ring of cool debris analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. Early observations at (sub-)mm wavelengths gave tentative evidence of the presence of inhomogeneities in the ring, which have been ascribed to the effect of a putative low eccentricity planet, orbiting close to the ring. The existence of these structures have been recently challenged by high resolution interferometric millimeter observations. Here we present the deepest single-dish image of Epsilon Eridani at millimeter wavelengths, obtained with the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT). The main goal of these LMT observations is to confirm (or refute) the presence of non-axisymmetric structure in the disk. The dusty ring is detected for the first time along its full projected elliptical shape. The radial extent of the ring is not spatially resolved and shows no evidence, to within the uncertainties, of dust density enhancements. Additional features of the 1.1 mm map are: (i) the presence of significant flux in the gap between the ring and the star, probably providing the first exo-solar evidence of Poynting-Robertson drag, (ii) an unambiguous detection of emission at the stellar position with a flux significantly above that expected from Epsilon Eridani's photosphere, and (iii) the identification of numerous unresolved sources which could correspond to background dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • We present 8.5 arcsec resolution 1.1mm continuum imaging and CO spectroscopic redshift measurements of eight extremely bright submillimetre galaxies identified from the Planck and Herschel surveys, taken with the Large Millimeter Telescope's AzTEC and Redshift Search Receiver instruments. We compiled a candidate list of high redshift galaxies by cross-correlating the Planck Surveyor mission's highest frequency channel (857 GHz, FWHM = 4.5 arcmin) with the archival Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) imaging data, and requiring the presence of a unique, single Herschel counterpart within the 150 arcsec search radius of the Planck source positions with 350 micron flux density larger than 100 mJy, excluding known blazars and foreground galaxies. All eight candidate objects observed are detected in 1.1mm continuum by AzTEC bolometer camera, and at least one CO line is detected in all cases with a spectroscopic redshift between 1.3 < z(CO) < 3.3. Their infrared spectral energy distributions mapped using the Herschel and AzTEC photometry are consistent with cold dust emission with characteristic temperature between $T_d$ = 43 K and 84 K. With apparent infrared luminosity of up to L(IR) = $3\times10^{14} \mu^{-1} L_\odot$, they are some of the most luminous galaxies ever found (with yet unknown gravitational magnification factor $\mu$). The analysis of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggests that star formation is powering the bulk of their extremely large IR luminosities. Derived molecular gas masses of $M_{H2}=(0.6-7.8)\times 10^{11} M_\odot$ (for $\mu$~10) also make them some of the most gas-rich high redshift galaxies ever detected.
  • We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR~10^13 L_sun) with strong radio emission (L_1.4GHz~10^25 W/Hz) at z=2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SpaceWarps through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (r_e~3") around an LRG at z=0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3-2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [OIII] and H-alpha line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/IRCS. We have resolved the radio emission with high resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and JVLA C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of ~10x. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.
  • Recent observations with the GISMO (Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer) 2 mm camera revealed a detection 8 arcsec away from the lensed galaxy MACS1149-JD1 at z=9.6. Within the 17.5 arcsec FWHM GISMO beam, this detection is consistent with the position of the high-redshift galaxy and therefore, if confirmed, this object could be claimed to be the youngest galaxy producing significant quantities of dust. We present higher resolution (8.5 arcsec) observations of this system taken with the AzTEC 1.1 mm camera mounted on the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano. Dust continuum emission at the position of MACS1149-JD1 is not detected with an r.m.s. of 0.17 mJy/beam. However, we find a detection ~ 11 arcsec away from MACS1149-JD1, still within the GISMO beam which is consistent with an association to the GISMO source. Combining the AzTEC and GISMO photometry, together with Herschel ancillary data, we derive a z_phot= 0.7-1.6 for the dusty galaxy. We conclude therefore that the GISMO and AzTEC detections are not associated with MACS1149-JD1. From the non-detection of MACS1149-JD1 we derive the following (3 \sigma) upper limits corrected for gravitational lensing magnification and for cosmic microwave background effects: dust mass < 1.6 x 10^7 M_sun, IR luminosity < 8 x 10^10 L_sun, star formation rate < 14 M_sun/yr, and UV attenuation < 2.7 mag. These limits are comparable to those derived for other high-redshift galaxies from deep Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations.
  • Measuring redshifted CO line emission is an unambiguous method for obtaining an accurate redshift and total cold gas content of optically faint, dusty starburst systems. Here, we report the first successful spectroscopic redshift determination of AzTEC J095942.9+022938 ("COSMOS AzTEC-1"), the brightest 1.1mm continuum source found in the AzTEC/JCMT survey (Scott et al. 2008), through a clear detection of the redshifted CO (4-3) and CO (5-4) lines using the Redshift Search Receiver on the Large Millimeter Telescope. The CO redshift of $z=4.3420\pm0.0004$ is confirmed by the detection of the redshifted 158 micron [C II] line using the Submillimeter Array. The new redshift and Herschel photometry yield $L_{FIR}=(1.1\pm0.1)\times 10^{13} L_\odot$ and $SFR = 1300\, M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. Its molecular gas mass derived using the ULIRG conversion factor is $1.4\pm0.2 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$ while the total ISM mass derived from the 1.1mm dust continuum is $3.7\pm0.7 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$ assuming dust temperature of 35 K. Our dynamical mass analysis suggests that the compact gas disk ($r\approx 1.1$ kpc, inferred from dust continuum and SED analysis) has to be nearly face-on, providing a natural explanation for the uncommonly bright, compact stellar light seen by the HST. The [C II] line luminosity $L_{[C~II]} = 7.8\pm1.1 \times 10^9 L_\odot$ is remarkably high, but it is only 0.04 per cent of the total IR luminosity. AzTEC COSMOS-1 and other high redshift sources with a spatially resolved size extend the tight trend seen between [C II]/FIR ratio and $\Sigma_{FIR}$ among IR-bright galaxies reported by Diaz-Santos et al. (2013) by more than an order of magnitude, supporting the explanation that the higher intensity of the IR radiation field is responsible for the "[C II] deficiency" seen among luminous starburst galaxies.
  • We present Early Science observations with the Large Millimeter Telescope, AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum images and wide bandwidth spectra (73-111 GHz) acquired with the Redshift Search Receiver, towards four bright lensed submillimetre galaxies identified through the Herschel Lensing Survey-snapshot and the SCUBA-2 Cluster Snapshot Survey. This pilot project studies the star formation history and the physical properties of the molecular gas and dust content of the highest redshift galaxies identified through the benefits of gravitational magnification. We robustly detect dust continuum emission for the full sample and CO emission lines for three of the targets. We find that one source shows spectroscopic multiplicity and is a blend of three galaxies at different redshifts (z=2.040, 3.252 and 4.680), reminiscent of previous high-resolution imaging follow-up of unlensed submillimetre galaxies, but with a completely different search method, that confirm recent theoretical predictions of physically unassociated blended galaxies. Identifying the detected lines as 12CO (J_up=2-5) we derive spectroscopic redshifts, molecular gas masses, and dust masses from the continuum emission. The mean H_2 gas mass of the full sample is (2.0 +- 0.2) x 10^11 M_sun/\mu, and the mean dust mass is (2.0+-0.2) x 10^9 M_sun/\mu, where \mu=2-5 is the expected lens amplification. Using these independent estimations we infer a gas-to-dust ratio of \delta_GDR=55-75, in agreement with other measurements of submillimetre galaxies. Our magnified high-luminosity galaxies fall on the same locus as other high-redshift submillimetre galaxies, extending the L'_CO - L_FIR correlation observed for local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies to higher FIR and CO luminosities.
  • The source counts of galaxies discovered at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths provide important information on the evolution of infrared-bright galaxies. We combine the data from six blank-field surveys carried out at 1.1 mm with AzTEC, totalling 1.6 square degrees in area with root-mean-square depths ranging from 0.4 to 1.7 mJy, and derive the strongest constraints to date on the 1.1 mm source counts at flux densities S(1100) = 1-12 mJy. Using additional data from the AzTEC Cluster Environment Survey to extend the counts to S(1100) ~ 20 mJy, we see tentative evidence for an enhancement relative to the exponential drop in the counts at S(1100) ~ 13 mJy and a smooth connection to the bright source counts at >20 mJy measured by the South Pole Telescope; this excess may be due to strong lensing effects. We compare these counts to predictions from several semi-analytical and phenomenological models and find that for most the agreement is quite good at flux densities > 4 mJy; however, we find significant discrepancies (>3sigma) between the models and the observed 1.1 mm counts at lower flux densities, and none of them are consistent with the observed turnover in the Euclidean-normalised counts at S(1100) < 2 mJy. Our new results therefore may require modifications to existing evolutionary models for low luminosity galaxies. Alternatively, the discrepancy between the measured counts at the faint end and predictions from phenomenological models could arise from limited knowledge of the spectral energy distributions of faint galaxies in the local Universe.
  • We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.5<z<5.2 and a radio quiet quasar at z=6.3, obtained using the AzTEC bolometer array mounted on the ASTE or the JCMT. This paper more than doubles the number of high-z radio galaxies imaged at millimetre/sub-millimetre wavelengths. We detect probable millimetre-wave counterparts for 11 of the active galaxies. The 6 active galaxies which do not have a probable millimetre counterpart in our images nevertheless have one or more likely associated millimetric source. Thus, we conclude that powerful (radio-loud) active galaxies at high-z are beacons for finding luminous millimetre/sub-millimetre galaxies at high-z. The flux densities of our AzTEC counterparts imply star formation rates ranging from <200 to ~1300 M./yr. In addition, we find that for the radio galaxoes the 1.1 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galaxies in our sample. Combining these with archival data, we examine the mid-infrared colours of our sample. We find that radio galaxies for which we have detected a probable 1.1 mm counterpart have mid-infrared colours consistent with dusty starbursts, and are usually bluer than high-z Spitzer-selected active galaxies. In addition, we find arcs of 24 micron sources extending across ~200-500 kpc, apparently associated with three of the radio galaxies.
  • We present a 0.72 sq. deg. contiguous 1.1mm survey in the central area of the COSMOS field carried out to a 1sigma ~ 1.26 mJy/beam depth with the AzTEC camera mounted on the 10m Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We have uncovered 189 candidate sources at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N >= 3.5, out of which 129, with S/N >= 4, can be considered to have little chance of being spurious (< 2 per cent). We present the number counts derived with this survey, which show a significant excess of sources when compared to the number counts derived from the ~0.5 sq. deg. area sampled at similar depths in the Scuba HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES, Austermann et al. 2010). They are, however, consistent with those derived from fields that were considered too small to characterize the overall blank-field population. We identify differences to be more significant in the S > 5 mJy regime, and demonstrate that these excesses in number counts are related to the areas where galaxies at redshifts z < 1.1 are more densely clustered. The positions of optical-IR galaxies in the redshift interval 0.6 < z < 0.75 are the ones that show the strongest correlation with the positions of the 1.1mm bright population (S > 5 mJy), a result which does not depend exclusively on the presence of rich clusters within the survey sampled area. The most likely explanation for the observed excess in number counts at 1.1mm is galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-group lensing at moderate amplification levels, that increases in amplitude as one samples larger and larger flux densities. This effect should also be detectable in other high redshift populations.
  • [Abridged] We present the first results from a 1.1 mm confusion-limited map of the GOODS-S field taken with AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. We imaged a 270 sq. arcmin field to a 1\sigma depth of 0.48 - 0.73 mJy/beam, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although our GOODS-S map is extremely confused, we demonstrate that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with S/N >= 3.5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections. We derive the 1.1mm number counts from this field using both a "P(d)" analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique, and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well-fit by a Schechter function model with (S', N(3mJy), \alpha) = (1.30+0.19 mJy, 160+27 (mJy/deg^2)^(-1), -2.0). Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight constraints on the 1.1 mm number counts at S(1.1mm) = 0.5 mJy, and we find evidence that the faint-end of the number counts at S(850\mu m) < 2.0 mJy from various SCUBA surveys towards lensing clusters are biased high. In contrast to the 870 \mu m survey of this field with the LABOCA camera, we find no apparent under-density of sources compared to previous surveys at 1.1 mm. Additionally, we find a significant number of SMGs not identified in the LABOCA catalogue. We find that in contrast to observations at wavelengths < 500 \mu m, MIPS 24 \mu m sources do not resolve the total energy density in the cosmic infrared background at 1.1 mm, demonstrating that a population of z > 3 dust-obscured galaxies that are unaccounted for at these shorter wavelengths potentially contribute to a large fraction (~2/3) of the infrared background at 1.1 mm.