• Point-contact spectroscopy of several non-superconducting topological materials reveals a low temperature phase transition that is characterized by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-type of criticality. We find such a behavior of differential conductance for topological surfaces of non-magnetic and magnetic Pb$_{1-y-x}$Sn$_y$Mn$_x$Te. We examine a possible contribution from superconducting nanoparticles, and show to what extent our data are consistent with Brzezicki's et al. theory [arXiv:1812.02168], assigning the observations to a collective state adjacent to atomic steps at topological surfaces.
  • We demonstrate a novel approach to thermometry at the nanoscale exploiting a superconducting weak link. Such a weak link probed with nanosecond current pulses serves as a temperature sensing element and, due to the fast inherent dynamics, is capable of delivering unprecedented temporal resolution. We employ the thermometer to measure dynamic temperature of electrons in a long superconducting wire relaxing to the bath temperature after application of the heating pulse. Our measurement delivers nanosecond resolution thus providing the proof-of-concept of the fastest-todate all-solid-state thermometry. Our method improves the state-of-the-art temporal resolution of mesoscopic thermometry by at least two orders of magnitude, extending temporal resolution of existing experiments and introducing new possibilities for ultra-sensitive calorimeters and radiation detectors.
  • By direct magnetization measurements, performed employing a new detection scheme, we demonstrate an electrical control of magnetization in wurtzite (Ga,Mn)N. In this dilute magnetic insulator the Fermi energy is pinned by Mn ions in the mid-gap region, and the Mn3+ ions show strong single-ion anisotropy. We establish that (Ga,Mn)N sustains an electric field up to at least 5 MV/cm, indicating that Mn doping turns GaN into a worthwhile semi-insulating material. Under these conditions, the magnetoelectric coupling may be driven by the inverse piezoelectric effect that stretches the elementary cell along the c axis and, thus, affects the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy. We develop a corresponding theory and show that it describes the experimentally determined dependence of magnetization on the electric field quantitatively with no adjustable parameters as a function of the magnetic field and temperature. In this way, our work bridges two research domains developed so far independently: piezoelectricity of wurtzite semiconductors and electrical control of magnetization in hybrid and composite magnetic structures containing piezoelectric components.
  • We have embedded a small Josephson junction in a microwave resonator that allows simultaneous dc biasing and dispersive readout. Thermal fluctuations drive the junction into phase diffusion and induce a temperature-dependent shift in the resonance frequency. By sensing the thermal noise of a remote resistor in this manner, we demonstrate primary thermometry in the range from 300 mK to below 100 mK, and high-bandwidth (7.5 MHz) operation with a noise-equivalent temperature of better than 10 $\mathrm{\mu K/\sqrt{Hz}}$. At a finite bias voltage close to a Fiske resonance, amplification of the microwave probe signal is observed. We develop an accurate theoretical model of our device based on the theory of dynamical Coulomb blockade.
  • We have observed that the supercurrent across phase-biased, highly transmitting atomic size contacts is strongly reduced within a broad phase interval around {\pi}. We attribute this effect to quasiparticle trapping in one of the discrete sub-gap Andreev bound states formed at the contact. Trapping occurs essentially when the Andreev energy is smaller than half the superconducting gap {\Delta}, a situation in which the lifetime of trapped quasiparticles is found to exceed 100 \mus. The origin of this sharp energy threshold is presently not understood.
  • A shape-dependent superconducting resonance can be expected when an energy level associated with the transverse motion in a wire passes through the Fermi surface. We show that the recently observed width-dependent increase of $T_c$ in ${\rm Al}$ and ${\rm Sn}$ nanowires is a consequence of this shape resonance effect.
  • We report a new approach for progressive and well-controlled downsizing of nanostructures below the 10 nm scale. Low energetic ion beam (Ar+) is used for gentle surface erosion, progressively shrinking the dimensions with ~ 1 nm accuracy. The method enables shaping of nanostructure geometry and polishing the surface. The process is clean room / high vacuum compatible being suitable for various applications. Apart from technological advantages, the method enables study of various size phenomena on the same sample between sessions of ion beam treatment.
  • Progressive reduction of the effective diameter of a nanowire is applied to trace evolution of the shape of superconducting transition $R(T)$ in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum structures. In nanowires with effective diameter $\leq$ 15 nm the $R(T)$ dependences are much wider than predicted by the model of thermally activated phase slips. The effect can be explained by quantum fluctuations of the order parameter. Negative magnetoresistance is observed in the thinest samples. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with existing theoretical models. The effect should have a universal validity indicating a breakdown of zero resistance state in a superconductor below a certain scale.
  • The shape of experimentally observed R(T) transition of thin superconducting wires is analyzed. Broadening of the transition in quasi-1-dimensional superconducting channels is typically associated with phase slip mechanism provided by thermal or quantum fluctuations. It is shown that consideration of inevitable geometrical inhomogeneity and finite dimensions of real samples studied in experiments is of primary importance for interpretation of results. The analysis is based on experimental fact that for many superconducting materials the critical temperature is a function of characteristic dimension of a low-dimensional system: film thickness or wire cross section