• The MuPix7 chip is a monolithic HV-CMOS pixel chip, thinned down to 50 \mu m. It provides continuous self-triggered, non-shuttered readout at rates up to 30 Mhits/chip of 3x3 mm^2 active area and a pixel size of 103x80 \mu m^2. The hit efficiency depends on the chosen working point. Settings with a power consumption of 300 mW/cm^2 allow for a hit efficiency >99.5%. A time resolution of 14.2 ns (Gaussian sigma) is achieved. Latest results from 2016 test beam campaigns are shown.
  • The quantum mechanical propagator of a massive particle in a linear gravitational potential derived already in 1927 by Earle H. Kennard \cite{Kennard,Kennard2} contains a phase that scales with the third power of the time $T$ during which the particle experiences the corresponding force. Since in conventional atom interferometers the internal atomic states are all exposed to the same acceleration $a$, this $T^3$-phase cancels out and the interferometer phase scales as $T^2$. In contrast, by applying an external magnetic field we prepare two different accelerations $a_1$ and $a_2$ for two internal states of the atom, which translate themselves into two different cubic phases and the resulting interferometer phase scales as $T^3$. We present the theoretical background for, and summarize our progress towards experimentally realizing such a novel atom interferometer.
  • Single-chip CMOS-based biosensors that feature microcantilevers as transducer elements are presented. The cantilevers are functionalized for the capturing of specific analytes, e.g., proteins or DNA. The binding of the analyte changes the mechanical properties of the cantilevers such as surface stress and resonant frequency, which can be detected by an integrated Wheatstone bridge. The monolithic integrated readout allows for a high signal-to-noise ratio, lowers the sensitivity to external interference and enables autonomous device operation.
  • We investigate the relationship between the nested organization of mutualistic systems and their robustness against the extinction of species. We establish that a nested pattern of contacts is the best possible one as far as robustness is concerned, but only when the least linked species have the greater probability of becoming extinct. We introduce a coefficient that provides a quantitative measure of the robustness of a mutualistic system.
  • Large-scale grid infrastructures for in silico drug discovery open opportunities of particular interest to neglected and emerging diseases. In 2005 and 2006, we have been able to deploy large scale in silico docking within the framework of the WISDOM initiative against Malaria and Avian Flu requiring about 105 years of CPU on the EGEE, Auvergrid and TWGrid infrastructures. These achievements demonstrated the relevance of large-scale grid infrastructures for the virtual screening by molecular docking. This also allowed evaluating the performances of the grid infrastructures and to identify specific issues raised by large-scale deployment.
  • In 2003 we have measured the absolute frequency of the $(1S, F=1, m_F=\pm 1) \leftrightarrow (2S, F'=1, m_F'=\pm 1)$ two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen. We observed a variation of $(-29\pm 57)$ Hz over a 44 months interval separating this measurement from the previous one performed in 1999. We have combined this result with recently published results of optical transition frequency measurement in the $^{199}$Hg$^+$ ion and and comparison between clocks based on $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs. From this combination we deduce the stringent limits for fractional time variation of the fine structure constant $\partial/{\partial t}(\ln \alpha)=(-0.9\pm 4.2)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$ and for the ratio of $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs spin magnetic moments $\partial/{\partial t}(\ln[\mu_{\rm {Rb}}/\mu_{\rm {Cs}}])=(0.5\pm 2.1)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$. This is the first precise restriction for the fractional time variation of $\alpha$ made without assumptions about the relative drifts of the constants of electromagnetic, strong and weak interactions.
  • We have remeasured the absolute $1S$-$2S$ transition frequency $\nu_{\rm {H}}$ in atomic hydrogen. A comparison with the result of the previous measurement performed in 1999 sets a limit of $(-29\pm 57)$ Hz for the drift of $\nu_{\rm {H}}$ with respect to the ground state hyperfine splitting $\nu_{{\rm {Cs}}}$ in $^{133}$Cs. Combining this result with the recently published optical transition frequency in $^{199}$Hg$^+$ against $\nu_{\rm {Cs}}$ and a microwave $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs clock comparison, we deduce separate limits on $\dot{\alpha}/\alpha = (-0.9\pm 2.9)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$ and the fractional time variation of the ratio of Rb and Cs nuclear magnetic moments $\mu_{\rm {Rb}}/\mu_{\rm {Cs}}$ equal to $(-0.5 \pm 1.7)\times 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-1}$. The latter provides information on the temporal behavior of the constant of strong interaction.