• We assemble a sample of 24 hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). Parameterizing the light curve shape through rise and decline timescales shows that the two are highly correlated. Magnetar-powered models can reproduce the correlation, with the diversity in rise and decline rates driven by the diffusion timescale. Circumstellar interaction models can exhibit a similar rise-decline relation, but only for a narrow range of densities, which may be problematic for these models. We find that SLSNe are approximately 3.5 magnitudes brighter and have light curves 3 times broader than SNe Ibc, but that the intrinsic shapes are similar. There are a number of SLSNe with particularly broad light curves, possibly indicating two progenitor channels, but statistical tests do not cleanly separate two populations. The general spectral evolution is also presented. Velocities measured from Fe II are similar for SLSNe and SNe Ibc, suggesting that diffusion time differences are dominated by mass or opacity. Flat velocity evolution in most SLSNe suggests a dense shell of ejecta. If opacities in SLSNe are similar to other SNe Ibc, the average ejected mass is higher by a factor 2-3. Assuming $\kappa=0.1\,$cm$^2\,$g$^{-1}$, we estimate a mean (median) SLSN ejecta mass of 10$\,$M$_\odot$ (6$\,$M$_\odot$), with a range of 3-30$\,$M$_\odot$. Doubling the assumed opacity brings the masses closer to normal SNe Ibc, but with a high-mass tail. The most probable mechanism for generating SLSNe seems to be the core-collapse of a very massive hydrogen-poor star, forming a millisecond magnetar.
  • We present an optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic study of supernova (SN) 2009kn spanning ~1.5 yr from the discovery. The optical spectra are dominated by the narrow (full width at half-maximum ~1000 km s^-1) Balmer lines distinctive of a Type IIn SN with P Cygni profiles. Contrarily, the photometric evolution resembles more that of a Type IIP SN with a large drop in luminosity at the end of the plateau phase. These characteristics are similar to those of SN 1994W, whose nature has been explained with two different models with different approaches. The well-sampled data set on SN 2009kn offers the possibility to test these models, in the case of both SN 2009kn and SN 1994W. We associate the narrow P Cygni lines with a swept-up shell composed of circumstellar matter and SN ejecta. The broad emission line wings, seen during the plateau phase, arise from internal electron scattering in this shell. The slope of the light curve after the post-plateau drop is fairly consistent with that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Co, suggesting an SN origin for SN 2009kn. Assuming radioactivity to be the main source powering the light curve of SN 2009kn in the tail phase, we infer an upper limit for 56Ni mass of 0.023 M_sun. This is significantly higher than that estimated for SN 1994W, which also showed a much steeper decline of the light curve after the post-plateau drop. We also observe late-time near-infrared emission which most likely arises from newly formed dust produced by SN 2009kn. As with SN 1994W, no broad lines are observed in the spectra of SN 2009kn, not even in the late-time tail phase.
  • Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are the spectacular finale to massive stellar evolution. In this Letter, we identify a progenitor for the nearby core-collapse SN 2012aw in both ground based near-infrared, and space based optical pre-explosion imaging. The SN itself appears to be a normal Type II Plateau event, reaching a bolometric luminosity of 10$^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and photospheric velocities of $\sim$11,000 \kms\ from the position of the H$\beta$ P-Cygni minimum in the early SN spectra. We use an adaptive optics image to show that the SN is coincident to within 27 mas with a faint, red source in pre-explosion HST+WFPC2, VLT+ISAAC and NTT+SOFI images. The source has magnitudes $F555W$=26.70$\pm$0.06, $F814W$=23.39$\pm$0.02, $J$=21.1$\pm$0.2, $K$=19.1$\pm$0.4, which when compared to a grid of stellar models best matches a red supergiant. Interestingly, the spectral energy distribution of the progenitor also implies an extinction of $A_V>$1.2 mag, whereas the SN itself does not appear to be significantly extinguished. We interpret this as evidence for the destruction of dust in the SN explosion. The progenitor candidate has a luminosity between 5.0 and 5.6 log L/\lsun, corresponding to a ZAMS mass between 14 and 26 \msun\ (depending on $A_V$), which would make this one of the most massive progenitors found for a core-collapse SN to date.
  • We present adaptive optics imaging of the core collapse supernova (SN) 2009md, which we use together with archival \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} data to identify a coincident progenitor candidate. We find the progenitor to have an absolute magnitude of $V = -4.63^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ mag and a colour of $V-I = 2.29^{+0.25}_{-0.39}$ mag, corresponding to a progenitor luminosity of log $L$/L$_{\odot}$ $\sim4.54\pm0.19$ dex. Using the stellar evolution code STARS, we find this to be consistent with a red supergiant progenitor with $M = 8.5_{-1.5}^{+6.5}$ M$_{\odot}$. The photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009md is similar to that of the class of sub-luminous Type IIP SNe; in this paper we compare the evolution of SN 2009md primarily to that of the sub-luminous SN 2005cs. We estimate the mass of $^{56}$Ni ejected in the explosion to be $(5.4\pm1.3) \times 10^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$\ from the luminosity on the radioactive tail, which is in agreement with the low $^{56}$Ni masses estimated for other sub-luminous Type IIP SNe. From the lightcurve and spectra, we show the SN explosion had a lower energy and ejecta mass than the normal Type IIP SN 1999em. We discuss problems with stellar evolutionary models, and the discrepancy between low observed progenitor luminosities (log $L$/L$_{\odot}$ $\sim4.3-5$ dex) and model luminosities after the second-dredge-up for stars in this mass range, and consider an enhanced carbon burning rate as a possible solution. In conclusion, SN 2009md is a faint SN arising from the collapse of a progenitor close to the lower mass limit for core-collapse. This is now the third discovery of a low mass progenitor star producing a low energy explosion and low $^{56}$Ni ejected mass, which indicates that such events arise from the lowest end of the mass range that produces a core-collapse supernova (7-8 M$_{\odot}$).
  • We present the detection of the progenitor of the Type II SN 2011dh in archival pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. Using post-explosion Adaptive Optics imaging with Gemini NIRI+ALTAIR, the position of the SN in the pre-explosion images was determined to within 23mas. The progenitor object was found to be consistent with a F8 supergiant star (log L/L_{\odot}=4.92+/-0.20 and T_{eff}=6000+/-280K). Through comparison with stellar evolution tracks, this corresponds to a single star at the end of core C-burning with an initial mass of M_{ZAMS}=13+/-3M_{\odot}. The possibility of the progenitor source being a cluster is rejected, on the basis of: 1) the source is not spatially extended; 2) the absence of excess H\alpha\, emission; and 3) the poor fit to synthetic cluster SEDs. It is unclear if a binary companion is contributing to the observed SED, although given the excellent correspondence of the observed photometry to a single star SED we suggest the companion does not contribute significantly. Early photometric and spectroscopic observations show fast evolution similar to the transitional Type IIb SN 2008ax, and suggest that a large amount of the progenitor's hydrogen envelope was removed before explosion.
  • AIMS: The main goal of this work is to study possible signs of asymmetry in the bright optical transient in NGC300, with the aim of getting independent information on the explosion mechanism, the progenitor star and its circumstellar environment. METHODS: Using VLT-FORS1 we have obtained low-resolution optical linear spectropolarimetry of NGC300 OT2008-1 on two epochs, 48 and 55 days after the discovery, covering the spectral range 3600--9330A. RESULTS: The data show a continuum polarization at a very significant level. At least two separate components are identified. The first is characterized by a strong wavelength dependency and a constant position angle (68.6+/-0.3 degrees), which is parallel to the local spiral arm of the host galaxy. The second shows a completely different position angle (151.3+/-0.4) and displays a mild but statistically significant evolution between the two epochs. While the former is identified as arising in the interstellar dust associated with NGC300, the latter is most likely due to continuum polarization by dust scattering in the circumstellar environment. No line depolarization is detected in correspondence of the most intense emission lines, disfavoring electron scattering as the source of intrinsic polarization. This implies a very small deviation from symmetry in the continuum-forming region. Given the observed level of intrinsic polarization, the transient must be surrounded by a significant amount of dust (>4x10^-5 Msun), asymmetrically distributed within a few thousand AU. This most likely implies that one or more asymmetric outflow episodes took place during the past history of the progenitor.