• We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 mag deeper (r<20.6) than the GAMA main survey. There are 25814 galaxy redshifts for H-ATLAS sources from the GAMA main or filler surveys. GAMA DR3 is available at the survey website (www.gama-survey.org/dr3/).
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • We explore the behaviour of [CII]-157.74um forbidden fine-structure line observed in a sample of 28 galaxies selected from ~50deg^2 of the H-ATLAS survey. The sample is restricted to galaxies with flux densities higher than S_160um>150mJy and optical spectra from the GAMA survey at 0.02<z<0.2. Far-IR spectra centred on this redshifted line were taken with the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. The galaxies span 10<log(L_IR/Lo)<12 (where L_IR=L_IR[8-1000um]) and 7.3<log(L_[CII]/Lo)<9.3, covering a variety of optical galaxy morphologies. The sample exhibits the so-called [CII] deficit at high IR luminosities, i.e. L_[CII]/L_IR (hereafter [CII]/IR) decreases at high L_IR. We find significant differences between those galaxies presenting [CII]/IR>2.5x10^-3 with respect to those showing lower ratios. In particular, those with high ratios tend to have: (1) L_IR<10^11Lo; (2) cold dust temperatures, T_d<30K; (3) disk-like morphologies in r-band images; (4) a WISE colour 0.5<S_12um/S_22um<1.0; (5) low surface brightness Sigma_IR~10^8-9 Lo kpc^-2, (6) and specific star-formation rates of sSFR~0.05-3 Gyr^-1. We suggest that the strength of the far-UV radiation fields (<G_O>) is main parameter responsible for controlling the [CII]/IR ratio. It is possible that relatively high <G_O> creates a positively charged dust grain distribution, impeding an efficient photo-electric extraction of electrons from these grains to then collisionally excite carbon atoms. Within the brighter IR population, 11<log(L_IR/Lo)<12, the low [CII]/IR ratio is unlikely to be modified by [CII] self absorption or controlled by the presence of a moderately luminous AGN (identified via the BPT diagram).
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Explorer ($WISE$), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of $> 110, 000$ galaxies over 120 deg$^2$ to $z\simeq 0.5$. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-$WISE$ catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterising and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4micron and 4.6micron WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Halpha-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12micron and 22micron luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to $z<0.5$. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12micron star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at $z\sim0.5$. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticated friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100$\,h^{-1} $kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.
  • Luminosity functions are one of the most important observational clues when studying galaxy evolution over cosmic time. In this paper we present the X-ray luminosity functions of X-ray detected AGN in the SXDS and GWS fields. The limiting fluxes of our samples are 9.0x10^(-15) and 4.8x10^(-16) erg/cm^2/sec^(-1) in the 0.5 - 7.0 keV band in the two fields, respectively. We carried out analysis in three X-ray bands and in two redshift intervals up to z < 1.4. Moreover, we derive the luminosity functions for different optical morphologies and X-ray types. We confirm strong luminosity evolution in all three bands, finding the most luminous objects at higher redshift. However, no signs of density evolution are found in any tested X-ray band. We obtain similar results for compact and early-type objects. Finally, we observe the `Steffen effect', where X-ray type-1 sources are more numerous at higher luminosities in comparison with type-2 sources.
  • Emission-line galaxies are important targets for understanding the chemical evolution of galaxies in the universe. Deep, narrow-band imaging surveys allow to detect and study the flux and the equivalent widths (EW) of the emission line studied. The present work has been developed within the context of the OTELO project, an emission line survey using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS, the first generation instrument on the GTC 10.4m telescope located in La Palma, Spain, that will observe through selected atmospheric windows relatively free of sky emission lines. With a total survey area of 0.1 square degrees distributed in different fields, reaching a 5 \sigma depth of 10^-18 erg/cm^2/s and detecting objects of EW < 0.3 A, OTELO will be the deepest emission line survey to date. As part of the OTELO preparatory activities, the objective of this study is to determine the best combination of sampling and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the OSIRIS tunable filters for deblending H\alpha from [NII] lines by analyzing the flux errors obtained. We simulated the OTELO data by convolving a complete set of synthetic HII galaxies in EW with different widths of the OSIRIS TFs. We estimated relative flux errors of the recovered H\alpha and [NII]6583 lines. We found that, for the red TF, a FWHM of 12 A and a sampling of 5 A is an optimal combination that allow deblending H\alpha from the [NII]6583 line with a flux error lower than 20%. This combination will allow estimating SFRs and metallicities using the H\alpha flux and the N2 method, respectively.
  • The Fundamental Plane relates the structural properties of early-type galaxies such as its surface brightness and effective radius with its dynamics. The study of its evolution has therefore important implications for models of galaxy formation and evolution. This work aims to identify signs of evolution of early-type galaxies through the study of parameter correlations using a sample of 135 field galaxies extracted from the Extended Groth Strip in the redshift range 0.2<z<1.2. Using DEEP2 data, we calculate the internal velocity dispersions by extracting the stellar kinematics from absorption line spectra, using a maximum penalized likelihood approach. Morphology was determined through visual classification using the V+I images of ACS. The structural parameters of these galaxies were obtained by fitting de Vaucouleurs stellar profiles to the ACS I-band images, using the GALFIT code. S\'ersic and bulge-to-disc decomposition models were also fitted to our sample of galaxies, and we found a good agreement in the Fundamental Plane derived from the three models. Assuming that effective radii and velocity dispersions do not evolve with redshift, we have found a brightening of 0.68 mag in the B-band and 0.52 mag in the g-band at <z>=0.7. However, the scatter in the FP is reduced by half when we allow the FP slope to evolve, suggesting a different evolution of early-type galaxies according to their intrinsic properties. The study of the Kormendy relation shows the existence of a population of very compact (Re<2 Kpc) and bright galaxies (-21.5>Mg>-22.5), of which there are only a small fraction (0.4%) at z=0. The evolution of these compact objects is mainly caused by an increase in size that could be explained by the action of dry minor mergers, and this population is responsible for the evolution detected in the Fundamental Plane.
  • Star formation rate (SFR), metallicity and stellar mass are within the important parameters of star--forming galaxies that characterize their formation and evolution. They are known to be related to each other at low and high redshift in the mass--metallicity, mass--SFR, and metallicity--SFR relations. In this work we demonstrate the existence of a plane in the 3D space defined by the axes SFR [log(SFR)(M_sun yr^-1)], gas metallicity [12+log(O/H)], and stellar mass [log(M_star/M_sun)] of star-forming galaxies. We used star--forming galaxies from the "main galaxy sample" of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey--Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.1 and r-magnitudes between 14.5 and 17.77. Metallicities, SFRs, and stellar masses were taken from the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics-John Hopkins University (MPA-JHU) emission line analysis database. From a final sample of 44214 galaxies, we find for the first time a fundamental plane for field galaxies relating the SFR, gas metallicity, and stellar mass for star--forming galaxies in the local universe. One of the applications of this plane would be estimating stellar masses from SFR and metallicity. High redshift data from the literature at redshift ~2.2 and 3.5, do not show evidence for evolution in this fundamental plane.
  • The Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) represents a connection between fundamental galaxy parameters, such as its total mass and the mass locked in stars. Therefore, the study of the evolution of this relation in the optical and infrared bands can provide valuable information about the evolution of the individual galaxies through the changes found in each band. This work aims to study the TFR at high redshift in the B, V, R, I, and K-bands by comparison with the local relations derived from a large sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.1<z<0.3, processed in the same way, and with the same instrumental constraints that the high-redshift sample. Using the large photometric information available in the AEGIS database, we have studied the best procedure to obtain reliable k-corrections. Instrumental magnitudes are then k and extinction corrected and the absolute magnitudes derived, using the concordance cosmological model. The rotational velocities have been obtained from the widths of optical lines using DEEP2 spectra. Finally, morphology has been determined via visual classification of the HST images. We detect evolution in the B, V and R-band TFRs in the sense that galaxies were brighter in the past for the same rotation velocity. The change in luminosity is more noticeable in the bluer bands. This colour evolution, unnoticed in our previous work (Fern\'andez Lorenzo et al. 2009) has been detected thanks to the more reliable k-corrections carried out in this paper, which included photometry from B to IRAC bands. The change in the (V-K) and (R-I) colours (for a fixed velocity) could be interpreted as an ageing of the stellar populations as consequence of the star formation decrease since z=1.25. In addition, we conclude that spiral galaxies could have doubled their stellar masses in the last 8.6 Gyr.
  • To understand the formation and evolution of galaxies, it is important to have a full comprehension of the role played by the metallicity, star formation rate (SFR), morphology, and color. The interplay of these parameters at different redshifts will substantially affect the evolution of galaxies and, as a consequence, the evolution of them will provide important clues and constraints on the galaxy evolution models. In this work we focus on the evolution of the SFR, metallicity of the gas, and morphology of galaxies at low redshift in search of signs of evolution. We use the S2N2 diagnostic diagram as a tool to classify star--forming, composite, and AGN galaxies. We analyzed the evolution of the three principal BPT diagrams, estimating the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) for our samples of galaxies, studying the luminosity and mass-metallicity relations, and analyzing the morphology of our sample of galaxies through the g-r color, concentration index, and SSFR. We found that the S2N2 is a reliable diagram to classify star--forming, composite, and AGNs galaxies. We demonstrate that the three principal BPT diagrams show an evolution toward higher values of [OIII]5007/Hb due to a metallicity decrement. We found an evolution in the mass-metallicity relation of ~ 0.2 dex for the redshift range 0.3 < z < 0.4 compared to our local one. From the analysis of the evolution of the SFR and SSFR as a function of the stellar mass and metallicity, we discovered a group of galaxies with higher SFR and SSFR at all redshift samples, whose morphology is consistent with those of late-type galaxies. Finally, the comparison of our local (0.04<z<0.1) with our higher redshift sample (0.3<z<0.4), show that the metallicity, the SFR and morphology, evolve toward lower values of metallicity, higher SFRs, and late--type morphologies for the redshift range 0.3<z<0.4
  • The chemical composition of the gas in galaxies versus cosmic time provides a very important tool for understanding galaxy evolution. Although there are many studies at high redshift, they are rather scarce at lower redshifts. However, low redshift studies can provide important clues about the evolution of galaxies, furnishing the required link between local and high redshift universe. In this work we focus on the metallicity of the gas of star-forming galaxies at low redshift, looking for signs of chemical evolution. To analyze the metallicity contents star-forming galaxies of similar luminosities and masses at different redshifts. With this purpose, we present a study of the metallicity of relatively massive (log(M_star/M_sun)>10.5) star forming galaxies from SDSS--DR5 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey--Data Release 5), using different redshift intervals from 0.04 to 0.4. We used data processed with the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code, correcting the fluxes for dust extinction, estimating metallicities using the R_23 method, and segregating the samples with respect to the value of the [NII]6583/[OII]3727 line ratio in order to break the R_23 degeneracy selecting the upper branch. We analyze the luminosity and mass-metallicity relations, and the effect of the Sloan fiber diameter looking for possible biases. By dividing our redshift samples in intervals of similar magnitude and comparing them, significant signs of metallicity evolution are found. Metallicity correlates inversely with redshift: from redshift 0 to 0.4 a decrement of ~0.1 dex in 12+log(O/H) is found.
  • The study of the evolution of the Tully-Fisher relation has been controversial in the past years. The main difficulty is in determining the required parameters for intermediate and high redshift galaxies. This work aims to identify the main problems of the study of the Tully-Fisher relation at high redshift using optical emission lines, in order to draw conclusions about the possible evolution of this relation in the B, R, and I-bands. With this aim, the rotational velocities obtained from the widths of different optical lines using DEEP2 spectra are compared. Morphology has been determined via HST images, using and comparing different methodologies. Instrumental magnitudes are then corrected for K and extinction and the absolute magnitudes derived for the concordance cosmological model. Finally, the optical Tully-Fisher relations in B, R, and I-bands at different redshifts up to z = 1.3 are derived. Although most studies (this one included) find evidence of evolution, the results are not conclusive enough, since the possible luminosity evolution is within the scattering of the relation, and the evolution in slope is difficult to determine because at high redshift only the brightest galaxies can be measured. Nevertheless, our study shows a clear tendency, which is the same for all bands studied, that favours a luminosity evolution where galaxies were brighter in the past for the same rotation velocity. This result also implies that the colour of the Tully-Fisher relation does not change with redshift, supporting the collapse model versus the accretion model of disc galaxy formation.
  • Evolution of galaxies through cosmic time has been widely studied at high redshift, but there are a few studies in this field at lower redshifts. However, low-redshifts studies will provide important clues to the evolution of galaxies, furnishing the required link between local and high-redshift universe. In this work we focus on the metallicity of the gas in spiral galaxies at low redshift looking for signs of chemical evolution. We analyze the metallicity contents of star forming galaxies of similar luminosities at different redshifts, we studied the metallicity of star forming galaxies from SDSS-DR5 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey-Data Release 5), using different redshift intervals from 0.1 to 0.4. We used the public data of SDSS-DR5 processed with the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code, correcting the fluxes for dust extinction, estimating metallicities using the R23 method, and analyzing the samples with respect to the [NII]6583/[OII]3727 line ratio. From a final sample of 207 galaxies, we find a decrement in 12+log(O/H) corresponding to the redshift interval 0.3 < z < 0.4 of ~0.1 dex with respect to the rest of the sample, which can be interpreted as evidence of the metallicity evolution in low-z galaxies.