• Line-of-sight integrals of the squared density, commonly called the J-factor, are essential for inferring dark matter annihilation signals. The J-factors of dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) have typically been derived using Bayesian techniques, which for small data samples implies that a choice of priors constitutes a non-negligible systematic uncertainty. Here we report the development of a new fully frequentist approach to construct the profile likelihood of the J-factor. Using stellar kinematic data from several classical and ultra-faint dSphs, we derive the maximum likelihood value for the J-factor and its confidence intervals. We validate this method, in particular its bias and coverage, using simulated data from the Gaia Challenge. We find that the method possesses good statistical properties. The J-factors and their uncertainties are generally in good agreement with the Bayesian-derived values, with the largest deviations restricted to the systems with the smallest kinematic datasets. We discuss improvements, extensions, and future applications of this technique.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will have a unique chance of discovery for a large range of masses in Weakly Interacting Massive Particles models of dark matter. The principal target for dark matter searches with CTA is the centre of the Galactic Halo. The best strategy is to perform CTA observations within a few degrees of the Galactic Centre, with the Galactic Centre itself and the most intense diffuse emission regions removed from the analysis. Assuming a cuspy dark matter density profile for the Milky Way, 500 hours of observations in this region provide sensitivities to and below the thermal cross-section of dark matter annihilations, for masses between a few hundred GeV and a few tens of TeV; therefore CTA will have a significant chance of discovery in some models. Since the dark matter density in the Milky Way is far from certain in the inner kpc region, other targets are also proposed for observation, like ultra-faint dwarf galaxies such as Segue 1 with 100 hours per year proposed. Beyond these two observational targets, further alternatives, such as Galactic dark clumps, will be considered closer to the actual date of CTA operations. Sensitivity predictions for dark matter searches are given on the various targets taking into account the latest instrument response functions expected for CTA together with a discussion on the systematic uncertainties from the backgrounds.
  • The detailed origin of the diffuse gamma-ray background is still unknown. However, the contribution of unresolved sources is expected to induce small-scale anisotropies in this emission, which may provide a way to identify and constrain the properties of its contributors. Recent studies have predicted the contributions to the angular power spectrum (APS) from extragalactic and galactic dark matter (DM) annihilation or decay. The Fermi-LAT collaboration reported detection of angular power with a significance larger than $3\sigma$ in the energy range from 1 GeV to 10 GeV on 22 months of data [Ackermann et al. 2012]. For these preliminary results the already published Fermi-LAT APS measurements [Ackermann et al. 2012] are compared to the accurate predictions for DM anisotropies from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations as presented in [Fornasa et al. 2013] to derive constraints on different DM candidates.
  • In many Dark Matter (DM) scenarios, the annihilation of DM particles can produce gamma rays with a continuum spectrum that extends up to very high energies of the order of the electroweak symmetry breaking scale (hundreds of GeV). Astrophysical structures supposed to be dynamically dominated by DM, such as dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies, Galaxy Clusters (the largest ones in the local Universe being mostly observable from the northern hemisphere) and Intermediate Mass Black Holes, can be considered as interesting targets to look for DM annihilation with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Instead, the center of our Galaxy seems to be strongly contaminated with astrophysical sources. The 17m Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC-I) Telescope, situated in the Canary island of La Palma (2200 m a.s.l.), is best suited for DM searches, due to its unique combination of high sensitivity and low energy threshold among current IACTs which can potentially allow to provide clues on the high energy end, and possibly peak, of the gamma-ray DM-induced spectrum constrained at lower energies with the Fermi Space Telescope. The recent results achieved by MAGIC-I for some of the best candidates, as well as the DM detection prospects for the MAGIC Phase II, are reported.
  • GAW, acronym for Gamma Air Watch, is a Research and Development experiment in the TeV range, whose main goal is to explore the feasibility of large field of view Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. GAW is an array of three relatively small telescopes (2.13 m diameter) which differs from the existing and presently planned projects in two main features: the adoption of a refractive optics system as light collector and the use of single photoelectron counting as detector working mode. The optics system allows to achieve a large field of view (24x24 squared degrees) suitable for surveys of large sky regions. The single photoelectron counting mode in comparison with the charge integration mode improves the sensitivity by permitting also the reconstruction of events with a small number of collected Cherenkov photons. GAW, which is a collaboration effort of Research Institutes in Italy, Portugal and Spain, will be erected in the Calar Alto Observatory (Sierra de Los Filabres - Andalucia, Spain), at 2150 m a.s.l.). The first telescope will be settled within Autumn 2007. This paper shows the main characteristics of the experiment and its expected performance.
  • We study the density profiles of collapsed galaxy-size dark matter halos with masses 1e11-5e12 Msun focusing mostly on the halo outer regions from the formal virial radius Rvir up to 5-7Rvir. We find that isolated halos in this mass range extend well beyond Rvir exhibiting all properties of virialized objects up to 2-3Rvir: relatively smooth density profiles and no systematic infall velocities. The dark matter halos in this mass range do not grow as one naively may expect through a steady accretion of satellites, i.e., on average there is no mass infall. This is strikingly different from more massive halos, which have large infall velocities outside of the virial radius. We provide accurate fit for the density profile of these galaxy-size halos. For a wide range (0.01-2)Rvir of radii the halo density profiles are fit with the approximation rho=rho_s exp(-2n[x^{1/n}-1])+rho_m, where x=r/r_s, rho_m is the mean matter density of the Universe, and the index n is in the range n=6-7.5. These profiles do not show a sudden change of behavior beyond the virial radius. For larger radii we combine the statistics of the initial fluctuations with the spherical collapse model to obtain predictions for the mean and most probable density profiles for halos of several masses. The model give excellent results beyond 2-3 formal virial radii.