• We have compared the star-formation properties of the W49A and W51 regions by using far-infrared data from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) and 850-um observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) to obtain luminosities and masses, respectively, of associated compact sources. The former are infrared luminosities from the catalogue of Elia et al. (2017), while the latter are from the JCMT Plane survey source catalogue as well as measurements from new data. The clump-mass distributions of the two regions are found to be consistent with each other, as are the clump-formation efficiency and star-formation efficiency analogues. However, the frequency distributions of the luminosities of the young stellar objects are significantly different. While the luminosity distribution in W51 is consistent with Galaxy-wide samples, that of W49A is top-heavy. The differences are not dramatic, and are concentrated in the central regions of W49A. However, they suggest that physical conditions there, which are comparable in part to those in extragalactic starbursts, are significantly affecting the star-formation properties or evolution of the dense clumps in the region.
  • We present the first data release of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Plane Survey (JPS), the JPS Public Release 1 (JPSPR1). JPS is an 850-um continuum survey of six fields in the northern inner Galactic Plane in a longitude range of l=7-63, made with the Sub-millimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2). This first data release consists of emission maps of the six JPS regions with an average pixel-to-pixel noise of 7.19 mJy beam^-1, when smoothed over the beam, and a compact-source catalogue containing 7,813 sources. The 95 per cent completeness limits of the catalogue are estimated at 0.04 Jy beam^-1 and 0.3 Jy for the peak and integrated flux densities, respectively. The emission contained in the compact-source catalogue is 42 +- 5 per cent of the total and, apart from the large-scale (greater than 8') emission, there is excellent correspondence with features in the 500-um Herschel maps. We find that, with two-dimensional matching, 98 +- 2 per cent of sources within the fields centred at l=20, 30, 40 and 50 are associated with molecular clouds, with 91 +- 3 per cent of the l=30 and 40 sources associated with dense molecular clumps. Matching the JPS catalogue to Herschel 70-um sources, we find that 38 +- 1 per cent of sources show evidence of ongoing star formation. The images and catalogue will be a valuable resource for studies of star formation in the Galaxy and the role of environment and spiral arms in the star formation process.
  • We present the discovery of 816 high amplitude infrared variable stars ($\Delta K_{\rm s} >$ 1 mag) in 119 deg$^2$ of the Galactic midplane covered by the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) survey. Almost all are new discoveries and about 50$\%$ are YSOs. This provides further evidence that YSOs are the commonest high amplitude infrared variable stars in the Galactic plane. In the 2010-2014 time series of likely YSOs we find that the amplitude of variability increases towards younger evolutionary classes (class I and flat-spectrum sources) except on short timescales ($<$25 days) where this trend is reversed. Dividing the likely YSOs by light curve morphology, we find 106 with eruptive light curves, 45 dippers, 39 faders, 24 eclipsing binaries, 65 long-term periodic variables (P$>$100 days) and 162 short-term variables. Eruptive YSOs and faders tend to have the highest amplitudes and eruptive systems have the reddest SEDs. Follow up spectroscopy in a companion paper verifies high accretion rates in the eruptive systems. Variable extinction is disfavoured by the 2 epochs of colour data. These discoveries increase the number of eruptive variable YSOs by a factor of at least 5, most being at earlier stages of evolution than the known FUor and EXor types. We find that eruptive variability is at least an order of magnitude more common in class I YSOs than class II YSOs. Typical outburst durations are 1 to 4 years, between those of EXors and FUors. They occur in 3 to 6\% of class I YSOs over a 4 year time span.
  • In a companion work (Paper I) we detected a large population of highly variable Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) survey, typically with class I or flat spectrum spectral energy distributions and diverse light curve types. Here we present infrared spectra (0.9--2.5 $\mu$m) of 37 of these variables, many of them observed in a bright state. The spectra confirm that 15/18 sources with eruptive light curves have signatures of a high accretion rate, either showing EXor-like emission features ($\Delta$v=2 CO, Br$\gamma$) and/or FUor-like features ($\Delta$v=2 CO and H$_{2}$O strongly in absorption). Similar features were seen in some long term periodic YSOs and faders but not in dippers or short-term variables. The sample includes some dusty Mira variables (typically distinguished by smooth Mira-like light curves), 2 cataclysmic variables and a carbon star. In total we have added 19 new objects to the broad class of eruptive variable YSOs with episodic accretion. Eruptive variable YSOs in our sample that were observed at bright states show higher accretion luminosities than the rest of the sample. Most of the eruptive variables differ from the established FUor and EXor subclasses, showing intermediate outburst durations and a mixture of their spectroscopic characteristics. This is in line with a small number of other recent discoveries. Since these previously atypical objects are now the majority amongst embedded members of the class, we propose a new classification for them as MNors. This term (pronounced emnor) follows V1647 Ori, the illuminating star of McNeil's Nebula.
  • High-amplitude variability in Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is usually associated with episodic accretion events. It has not been observed so far in massive YSOs. Here, the high-amplitude variable star sample of ContrerasPe\~{n}a et al.(2016) has been used to search for highly-variable($\Delta$K$\ge$1\,mag) sources coinciding with dense clumps mapped using the 850\mum continuum emission by the ATLASGAL survey. 18 variable sources are centred on the sub-mm clump peaks, and coincide ($<$1") with a 24$\mu$m point or compact ($<$10") source. 13 of these 18 sources can be fit by YSO models. The 13 variable YSOs(VYSO) have luminosities of $\sim$10$^3$ L$_{\odot}$, an average mass of 8 M$_{\odot}$ and a range of ages up to 10$^6$ yr. 11 of these 13 VYSOs are located in the midst of infrared dark clouds. 9 of the 13 sources have $\Delta$K$>$2 mag, significantly higher compared to the mean variability of the entire VVV sample. The light curves of these objects sampled between 2010-2015 display rising, declining, or quasi-periodic behaviour but no clear periodicity. Light-curve analysis using Plavchan method show that the most prominent phased signals have periods of a few hundred days. The nature and time-scale of variations found in 6.7 Ghz methanol maser emission (MME) in massive stars are similar to that of the VYSO light curves. We argue that the origin of the observed variability is episodic accretion. We suggest that the timescale of a few hundred days may represent the frequency at which a spiralling disk feeds dense gas to the young massive star.
  • We present millimetre (SMA) and sub-millimetre (SCUBA-2) continuum observations of the peculiar star KIC 8462852 which displayed several deep and aperiodic dips in brightness during the Kepler mission. Our observations are approximately confusion-limited at 850 $\mu$m and are the deepest millimetre and sub-millimetre photometry of the star that has yet been carried out. No significant emission is detected towards KIC 8462852. We determine upper limits for dust between a few 10$^{-6}$ M$_{\oplus}$ and 10$^{-3}$ M$_{\oplus}$ for regions identified as the most likely to host occluding dust clumps and a total overall dust budget of $<$7.7 M$_{\oplus}$ within a radius of 200 AU. Such low limits for the inner system make the catastrophic planetary disruption hypothesis unlikely. Integrating over the Kepler lightcurve we determine that at least 10$^{-9}$ M$_{\oplus}$ of dust is required to cause the observed Q16 dip. This is consistent with the currently most favoured cometary breakup hypothesis, but nevertheless implies the complete breakup of $\sim$ 30 Comet 1/P Halley type objects. Finally, in the wide SCUBA-2 field-of-view we identify another candidate debris disc system that is potentially the largest yet discovered.
  • We present early results from the JCMT Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes l=7 and l=63 degrees in the 850-{\mu}m continuum with SCUBA-2, as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy Survey programme. Data from the l=30 degree survey region, which contains the massive star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40% of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy/beam, after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy/beam. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FellWalker method resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5-{\sigma} surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy/beam (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relatively crowded section of the survey. The flux densities of extracted compact sources are consistent with those of matching detections in the shallower ATLASGAL survey. We analyse the virial and evolutionary state of the detected clumps in the W43 star-forming complex and find that they appear younger than the Galactic-plane average.
  • We positionally match a sample of infrared-selected young stellar objects (YSOs), identified by combining the Spitzer GLIMPSE, WISE and Herschel Space Observatory Hi-GAL surveys, to the dense clumps identified in the millimetre continuum by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey in two Galactic lines of sight centred towards l = 30deg and l = 40deg. We calculate the ratio of infrared luminosity, L_IR, to the mass of the clump, M_clump, in a variety of Galactic environments and find it to be somewhat enhanced in spiral arms compared to the interarm regions when averaged over kiloparsec scales. We find no compelling evidence that these changes are due to the mechanical influence of the spiral arm on the star-formation efficiency rather than, e.g., different gradients in the star-formation rate due to patchy or intermittent star formation, or local variations that are not averaged out due to small source samples. The largest variation in L_IR/M_clump is found in individual clump values, which follow a log-normal distribution and have a range of over three orders of magnitude. This spread is intrinsic as no dependence of L_IR/M_clump with M_clump was found. No difference was found in the luminosity distribution of sources in the arm and interarm samples and a strong linear correlation was found between L_IR and M_clump.
  • We present a continuing study of a sample 44 molecular outflows, observed in 13CO lines, closely associated with 6.7GHz methanol masers, hence called Methanol Maser Associated Outflows (MMAOs). We compare MMAO properties with those of outflows from other surveys in the literature. In general, MMAOs follow similar trends, but show a deficit in number at low masses and momenta, with a corresponding higher fraction at the high end of the distributions. A similar trend is seen for the dynamical timescales of MMAOs. We argue that the lack of relatively low mass and young flows in MMAOs is due to the inherent selection-bias in the sample, i.e. its direct association with 6.7GHz methanol masers. This implies that methanol masers must switch on after the onset of outflows (hence accretion), and not before a sufficient abundance of methanol is liberated from icy dust mantles. Consequently the average dynamical age of MMAOs is older than for the general population of molecular outflows. We propose an adjusted evolutionary sequence of outflow and maser occurrence in the hot core phase, where methanol masers turn on after the onset of the outflow phase.
  • HCN is becoming a popular choice of molecule for studying star formation in both low- and high-mass regions and for other astrophysical sources from comets to high-redshift galaxies. However, a major and often overlooked difficulty with HCN is that it can exhibit non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) behaviour in its hyperfine line structure. Individual hyperfine lines can be strongly boosted or suppressed. In low-mass star-forming cloud observations, this could possibly lead to large errors in the calculation of opacity and excitation temperature, while in massive star-forming clouds, where the hyperfine lines are blended due to turbulent broadening, errors will arise in infall measurements that are based on the separation of the peaks in a self-absorbed profile. The underlying line shape cannot be known for certain if hyperfine anomalies are present. We present a first observational investigation of these anomalies across a range of conditions and transitions by carrying out a survey of low-mass starless cores (in Taurus & Ophiuchus) and high-mass protostellar objects (in the G333 giant molecular cloud) using hydrogen cyanide (HCN) J=1-0 and J=3-2 emission lines. We quantify the degree of anomaly in these two rotational levels by considering ratios of individual hyperfine lines compared to LTE values. We find that all the cores observed show some degree of anomaly while many of the lines are severely anomalous. We conclude that HCN hyperfine anomalies are common in both lines in both low-mass and high-mass protostellar objects, and we discuss the differing hypotheses for the generation of the anomalies. In light of the results, we favour a line overlap effect for the origins of the anomalies. We discuss the implications for the use of HCN as a dynamical tracer and suggest in particular that the J=1-0, F=0-1 hyperfine line should be avoided in quantitative calculations.
  • We present a study of the mid-infrared environments and association with star formation tracers of 6.7 GHz methanol masers taken from the Methanol Multi-Beam (MMB) Survey. Our ultimate goal is to establish the mass of the host star and its evolutionary stage for each maser site. As a first step, the GLIMPSE survey of the Galactic Plane is utilised to investigate the environment of 776 methanol masers and we find that while the majority of the masers are associated with mid-infrared counterparts, a significant fraction (17%) are not associated with any detectable mid-infrared emission. A number of the maser counterparts are clearly extended with respect to the GLIMPSE point spread function and we implement an adaptive non-circular aperture photometry (ANCAP) technique to determine the fluxes of the maser counterparts. The ANCAP technique doubles the number of masers with flux information at all four wavelengths compared to the number of the corresponding counterparts obtained from the GLIMPSE Point Source Catalogue. The colours of the maser counterparts are found to be very similar to the smaller study carried out by Ellingsen (2006). The MMB masers are weakly associated with Extended Green Objects (EGOs) and Red MSX Survey (RMS) embedded sources (YSO and HII classifications) with 18% and 12% of masers associated with these objects respectively. The majority of MMB masers (60%) have detectable GLIMPSE infrared counterparts but have not been identified with previously recognised tracers of massive star formation; this confirms that the MMB survey has the potential to identify massive star forming regions independent of infrared selection.
  • We identify near-infrared Ks band counterparts to Herschel-ATLAS sub-mm sources, using a preliminary object catalogue from the VISTA VIKING survey. The sub-mm sources are selected from the H-ATLAS Phase 1 catalogue of the GAMA 9h field, which includes all objects detected at 250, 350 or 500 um with the SPIRE instrument. We apply and discuss a likelihood ratio (LR) method for VIKING candidates within a search radius of 10" of the 22,000 SPIRE sources with a 5 sigma detection at 250 um. We find that 11,294(51%) of the SPIRE sources have a best VIKING counterpart with a reliability $R\ge 0.8$, and the false identification rate of these is estimated to be 4.2%. We expect to miss ~5% of true VIKING counterparts. There is evidence from Z-J and J-Ks colours that the reliable counterparts to SPIRE galaxies are marginally redder than the field population. We obtain photometric redshifts for ~68% of all (non-stellar) VIKING candidates with a median redshift of 0.405. Comparing to the results of the optical identifications supplied with the Phase I catalogue, we find that the use of medium-deep near-infrared data improves the identification rate of reliable counterparts from 36% to 51%.
  • Context: Despite their profound effect on the universe, the formation of massive stars and stellar clusters remains elusive. In the past decade, compelling evidence has emerged that suggests Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) may be precursors to stellar clusters. However, the usual method for identifying IRDCs is biased by the requirement that they are seen in absorption against bright mid-IR emission, whereas dust continuum observations allow cold, dense pre-stellar-clusters to be identified anywhere. Aims: We aim to understand what physical properties characterize IRDCs, to explore the population of dust continuum sources that are not IRDCs, and to roughly characterize the star formation activity in dust continuum sources. Results: We present temperature and column density maps in the Hi-GAL l=30 and l=59 SDP fields, as well as a robust algorithm for cirrus subtraction and source identification using Hi-GAL. We report on the fraction of Hi-GAL sources which are mid-IR-dark, -neutral, or -bright in both fields. We find significant trends in column density and temperature between mid-IR-dark and -bright pixels; mid-IR-dark pixels are about 10 K colder and have a factor of 2 higher column density on average than mid-IR-bright pixels. We find that Hi-GAL dust continuum sources span a range of evolutionary states from pre- to star-forming, and that warmer sources are associated with more star formation tracers. There is a trend of increasing temperature with tracer type from mid-IR-dark at the coldest, to outflow/maser sources in the middle, and finally to 8 and 24 micron bright sources at the warmest. Finally, we identify five candidate IRDC-like sources on the far-side of the Galaxy. These are cold (~ 20 K), high column density (N(H2) > 10^22 cm^-2) clouds identified with Hi-GAL which, despite bright surrounding mid-IR emission, show little to no absorption at 8 micron. (abridged)
  • We use data from the Herschel-ATLAS to investigate the evolution of the far-infrared--radio correlation over the redshift range 0<z<0.5. Using the total far-infrared luminosity of all >5sigma sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field and cross-matching these data with radio data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimetres (FIRST) survey and the NRAO VLA Northern Sky Survey (NVSS), we obtain 104 radio counterparts to the Herschel sources. With these data we find no evidence for evolution in the far-infrared--radio correlation over the redshift range 0<z<0.5, where the median value for the ratio between far-infrared and radio luminosity, $q_{\rm IR}$, over this range is $q_{\rm IR} = 2.40\pm 0.12$ (and a mean of $q_{\rm IR}=2.52 \pm 0.03$ accounting for the lower limits), consistent with both the local value determined from {\em IRAS} and values derived from surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. By comparing the radio fluxes of our sample measured from both FIRST and NVSS we show that previous results suggesting an increase in the value of $q_{\rm IR}$ from high to low redshift may be the result of resolving out extended emission of the low-redshift sources with relatively high-resolution interferometric data, although AGN contamination could still play a significant role. We also find tentative evidence that the longer wavelength, cooler dust is heated by an evolved stellar population which does not trace the star-formation rate as closely as the shorter wavelength $\ltsim 250~\mu$m emission or the radio emission, supporting suggestions based on detailed models of individual galaxies.
  • Variations in the dust emissivity are critical for gas mass determinations derived from far-infrared observations, but also for separating dust foreground emission from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Hi-GAL observations allow us for the first time to study the dust emissivity variations in the inner regions of the Galactic plane at resolution below 1 degree. We present maps of the emissivity spectral index derived from the combined Herschel PACS 160 \mu m, SPIRE 250 \mu m, 350 \mu m, and 500 \mu m data, and the IRIS 100 \mu m data, and we analyze the spatial variations of the spectral index as a function of dust temperature and wavelength in the two Science Demonstration Phase Hi-GAL fields, centered at l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg}. Applying two different methods, we determine both dust temperature and emissivity spectral index between 100 and 500 \mu m, at an angular resolution of 4'. Combining both fields, the results show variations of the emissivity spectral index in the range 1.8-2.6 for temperatures between 14 and 23 K. The median values of the spectral index are similar in both fields, i.e. 2.3 in the range 100-500 \mu m, while the median dust temperatures are equal to 19.1 K and 16.0 K in the l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg} field, respectively. Statistically, we do not see any significant deviations in the spectra from a power law emissivity between 100 and 500 \mu m. We confirm the existence of an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, found in previous analyses.
  • We present wide area radio (12 mm) Mopra Telescope observations of the complex and rich massive star forming region G305. Our goals are to determine the reservoir for star formation within G305 using NH3 to trace the dense molecular content, and thus, the gas available to form stars; estimate physical parameters of detected NH3 clumps (temperature, column density, mass etc); locate current areas of active star formation via the presence of H2O and methanol masers and the distribution of YSOs and ultra compact HII regions associated with this region. This paper details the NH3 (J,K), (1,1), (2,2) and (3,3) inversion transition and 22 GHz H2O maser observations. We observed a \sim 1.5\circ x 1\circ region with \sim 2' angular resolution and a sensitivity of \sim 60 mK per 0.4 km s^-1 channel. We identify 15 NH3 (1,1), 12 NH3 (2,2) and 6 NH3 (3,3) clumps surrounding the central HII region. The sizes of the clumps vary between < 2.6 and 10.1 pc, the average kinetic temperature of the gas is 25 K. We calculate clump masses of > 10^4 M\odot and find the total molecular mass of the complex to be \sim 6x10^5 M\odot. We note the positions of 56 star formation tracers, and discover a high degree of correlation with detected NH3 clumps. We have detected 16 H2O masers, find they correlate with the detected ammonia clumps and in general are found closer to the NH3 clump cores than star formation tracers of later evolutionary stages.
  • We observed 42 molecular condensations within previously identified bright-rimmed clouds in the ammonia rotational inversion lines NH3 (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) and (4,4) using the Green Bank Telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Using the relative peaks of the ammonia lines and their hyperfine satellites we have determined important parameters of these clouds, including rotational temperatures and column densities. These observations confirm the presence of dense gas towards IRAS point sources detected at submillimetre wavelengths. Derived physical properties allow us to refine the sample of bright-rimmed clouds into those likely to be sites of star formation, triggered via the process of radiatively-driven implosion. An investigation of the physical properties of our sources show that triggered sources are host to greater turbulent velocity dispersions, likely indicative of shock motions within the cloud material. These may be attributed to the passage of triggered shocks or simply the association of outflow activity with the sources. In all, we have refined the Sugitani et al. (1991) catalogue to 15 clouds which are clearly star-forming and influenced by external photoionisation-induced shocks. These sources may be said, with high confidence, to represent the best examples of triggering within bright-rimmed clouds.
  • Aims: We aim to demonstrate that the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) is suitable for a blind and unbiased survey for debris disks by identifying candidate debris disks associated with main sequence stars in the initial science demonstration field of the survey. We show that H-ATLAS reveals a population of far-infrared/sub-mm sources that are associated with stars or star-like objects on the SDSS main-sequence locus. We validate our approach by comparing the properties of the most likely candidate disks to those of the known population. Methods: We use a photometric selection technique to identify main sequence stars in the SDSS DR7 catalogue and a Bayesian Likelihood Ratio method to identify H-ATLAS catalogue sources associated with these main sequence stars. Following this photometric selection we apply distance cuts to identify the most likely candidate debris disks and rule out the presence of contaminating galaxies using UKIDSS LAS K-band images. Results: We identify 78 H-ATLAS sources associated with SDSS point sources on the main-sequence locus, of which two are the most likely debris disk candidates: H-ATLAS J090315.8 and H-ATLAS J090240.2. We show that they are plausible candidates by comparing their properties to the known population of debris disks. Our initial results indicate that bright debris disks are rare, with only 2 candidates identified in a search sample of 851 stars. We also show that H-ATLAS can derive useful upper limits for debris disks associated with Hipparcos stars in the field and outline the future prospects for our debris disk search programme.
  • We have determined the luminosity function of 250um-selected galaxies detected in the ~14 sq.deg science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z=0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250um luminosity density out to z=0.2 where it is 3.6+1.4-0.9 times higher than the local value.
  • We present colour-colour diagrams of detected sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field from 100 to 500 microns using both PACS and SPIRE. We fit isothermal modified black bodies to the spectral energy distribution (SED) to extract the dust temperature of sources with counterparts in Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) or SDSS surveys with either a spectroscopic or a photometric redshift. For a subsample of 330 sources detected in at least three FIR bands with a significance greater than 3 $\sigma$, we find an average dust temperature of $(28 \pm 8)$K. For sources with no known redshift, we populate the colour-colour diagram with a large number of SEDs generated with a broad range of dust temperatures and emissivity parameters, and compare to colours of observed sources to establish the redshift distribution of this sample. For another subsample of 1686 sources with fluxes above 35 mJy at 350 microns and detected at 250 and 500 microns with a significance greater than 3$\sigma$, we find an average redshift of $2.2 \pm 0.6$.
  • We present multiwavelength investigation of morphology, physical-environment, stellar contents and star formation activity in the vicinity of star-forming region Sh 2-100. It is found that the Sh 2-100 region contains seven HII regions of ultracompact and compact nature. The present estimation of distance for three HII regions, along with the kinematic distance for others, suggests that all of them belong to the same molecular cloud complex. Using NIR photometry, we identified the most probable ionizing sources of six HII regions. Their approximate photometric spectral type estimates suggest that they are massive early-B to mid-O ZAMS stars and agree well with radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz. The morphology of the complex shows a non-uniform distribution of warm and hot dust, well mixed with the ionized gas, which correlates well with the variation of average visual extinction (~ 4.2 - 97 mag) across the region. We estimated the physical parameters of ionized gas with the help of radio continuum observations. We detected an optically visible compact nebula located to the south of the 850 micron emission associated with one of the HII regions and the diagnostic of the optical emission line ratios gives electron density and electron temperature of ~ 0.67 x 10^3 cm^-3 and ~ 10^4 K, respectively. The physical parameters suggest that all the HII regions are in different stages of evolution, which correlate well with the probable ages in the range ~ 0.01 - 2 Myr of the ionizing sources. The positions of IR excess stars, ultracompact and compact HII regions at the periphery of an HI shell, possibly created by a WR star, indicate that star formation in Sh 2-100 region might have been induced by an expanding HI shell.
  • The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 510 square degrees of the extragalactic sky, four times larger than all the other Herschel surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimetre bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multi-wavelength datasets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programmes we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimetre survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wavebands.
  • The sub-millimetre wavelength regime is perhaps the most poorly explored over large areas of the sky, despite the considerable effort that has been expended in making deep maps over small regions. As a consequence the properties of the sub-millimetre sky as a whole, and of rare bright objects in particular, remains largely unknown. Here we describe a forthcoming survey (the SCUBA-2 ``All-Sky'' Survey, or SASSy) designed to address this issue by making a large-area map of approximately one-fifth of the sky visible from the JCMT (4800 square degrees) down to a 1 sigma noise level of 30 mJy/beam. This map forms the pilot for a much larger survey, which will potentially map the remaining sky visible from the JCMT, with the region also visible to ALMA as a priority. SASSy has been awarded 500 hours for the 4800 square degree pilot phase and will commence after the commissioning of SCUBA-2, expected in early 2008.
  • We present a SCUBA submillimetre (450 & 850 micron) survey of the environment of 105 IRAS point sources, selected from the Wood & Churchwell (1989a) and Kurtz, Churchwell & Wood (1994) radio ultracompact (UC) HII region surveys. We detected a total of 155 sub-mm clumps associated with the IRAS point sources and identified three distinct types of object: ultracompact cm-wave sources that are not associated with any sub-mm emission (sub-mm quiet objects), sub-mm clumps that are associated with ultracompact cm-wave sources (radio-loud clumps); and sub-mm clumps that are not associated with any known ultracompact cm-wave sources (radio-quiet clumps). 90% of the sample of IRAS point sources were found to be associated with strong sub-mm emission. We consider the sub-mm colours, morphologies and distance-scaled fluxes of the sample of sub-mm clumps and show that the sub-mm quiet objects are unlikely to represent embedded UC HII regions unless they are located at large heliocentric distances. Many of the 2.5 arcmin SCUBA fields contain more than one sub-mm clump, with an average number of companions (the companion clump fraction) of 0.90. The clumps are more strongly clustered than other candidate HMPOs and the mean clump surface density exhibits a broken power-law distribution with a break at 3 pc. We demonstrate that the sub-mm and cm-wave fluxes of the majority of radio-loud clumps are in excellent agreement with the standard model of ultracompact HII regions. We speculate on the nature of the radio-quiet sub-mm clumps and, whilst we do not yet have sufficient data to conclude that they are in a pre-UC HII region phase, we argue that their characteristics are suggestive of such a stage.
  • A three dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamical (SPH) model has been extended to study the radiative driven implosion effect of massive stars on the dynamical evolutions of surrounding molecular clouds. The new elements in the upgraded code are the inclusion of Lyman continuum in the incident radiation flux and the treatment of hydrogen ionisation process; introducing ionisation heating & recombination cooling effects; and adding a proper description of the magnetic and turbulent pressures to the internal pressure of the molecular cloud. The application of this newly developed model to the structure of the middle Eagle Nebula finger suggests that the shock induced by the ionising radiation at the front side of the head precedes an ionisation front moving towards the center of the core, and that the core at the fingertip is at transition stage evolving toward a state of induced star formation. The dynamical evolution of the velocity field of the simulated cloud structure is discussed to illustrate the role of the self-gravity and the different cloud morphologies which appear at different stages in the evolutionary process of the cloud. The modelled gas evaporation rate is consistent with that of current other models and the density, temperature and chemical profiles are agreement with the observed values. The relative lifetimes of different simulated cloud morphologies suggests a possible answer to the question of why more bright-rimmed clouds are observed to possess a flat-core than an elongated-core morphology. [Abridged]