• We present observations of rapid (sub-second) optical flux variability in V404 Cyg during its 2015 June outburst. Simultaneous three-band observations with the ULTRACAM fast imager on four nights show steep power spectra dominated by slow variations on ~100-1000s timescales. Near the peak of the outburst on June 26, a dramatic change occurs and additional, persistent sub-second optical flaring appears close in time to giant radio and X-ray flaring. The flares reach peak optical luminosities of ~few x 10^{36} erg/s. Some are unresolved down to a time resolution of 24 milliseconds. Whereas the fast flares are stronger in the red, the slow variations are bluer when brighter. The redder slopes, emitted power, and characteristic timescales of the fast flares can be explained as optically-thin synchrotron emission from a compact jet arising on size scales ~140-500 Gravitational radii (with a possible additional contribution by a thermal particle distribution). The origin of the slower variations is unclear. The optical continuum spectral slopes are strongly affected by dereddening uncertainties and contamination by strong H{alpha} emission, but the variations of these slopes follow relatively stable loci as a function of flux. Cross-correlating the slow variations between the different bands shows asymmetries on all nights consistent with a small red skew (i.e., red lag). X-ray reprocessing and non-thermal emission could both contribute to these. These data reveal a complex mix of components over five decades in timescale during the outburst.
  • We present a systematic search for radio counterparts to Ultra Luminous X-ray (ULX) source candidates based on a cross-correlation of the Swartz et al. (2004) ULX catalogue based on Chandra data and the FIRST radio survey. We find seven cases of conspiscuous peaks of radio emission that could be associated to ULX sources. Among these seven ULX radio candidates, three X-ray sources are located within 5" of the FIRST radio peaks. These three cases are shown and discussed individually.
  • We report on the first deeper X-ray broad-band observation of the hot spot galaxy NGC 2903 obtained with XMM-Newton. X-ray imaging and spectra of the spiral barred galaxy were obtained from XMM-Newton archival data to study its X-ray population and the conditions of the hot gas in its central region. We investigate the spectral properties of the discrete point-source population and give estimates of their X-ray spectral parameters. By analysing the RGS spectra, we derive temperature and abundances for the hot gas located in its central region. A total of six X-ray point sources (four of them ULX candidates) were detected in the energy range of 0.3-10.0 keV located within the galaxy D25 optical disk. Three of these sources are detected for the first time, and one of them with a luminosity of higher than 10^39 erg/s. After fitting three different models, we were able to estimate their luminosities, which are compatible with those of binaries with a compact object in the form of black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs). We extracted the combined first-order RGS1 and RGS2 spectra of its central region, which display several emission lines. Both O\,{\sc vii} $f$ and $r$ lines seem to be of similar strength, which is consistent with the presence of the collisionally ionized gas that is typical of starburst galaxies. We fitted the spectrum to a model for a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) and the continuum was modelled with a power law, resulting in a plasma temperature of T = 0.31 \pm 0.01 keV and an emission measure EM \equiv n_Hn_eV =6.4_{-0.4}^{+0.5}\times 10^{61}$~cm$^{-3}. We also estimated abundances that are consistent with solar values.
  • Since the discovery of the first broad iron-K line in 1995 from the Seyfert Galaxy MCG--6-30-15, broad iron-K lines have been found in several other Seyfert galaxies, from accreting stellar mass black holes and even from accreting neutron stars. The iron-K line is prominent in the reflection spectrum created by the hard X-ray continuum irradiating dense accreting matter. Relativistic distortion of the line makes it sensitive to the strong gravity and spin of the black hole. The accompanying iron-L line emission should be detectable when the iron abundance is high. Here we report the first discovery of both iron-K and L emission, using XMM-Newton observations of the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H0707-495. The bright Fe-L emission has enabled us, for the first time, to detect a reverberation lag of 30 s between the direct X-ray continuum and its reflection from matter falling into the hole. The observed reverberation timescale is comparable to the light-crossing time of the innermost radii around a supermassive black hole. The combination of spectral and timing data on 1H0707-495 provides strong evidence that we are witnessing emission from matter within a gravitational radius, or a fraction of a light-minute, from the event horizon of a rapidly-spinning, massive black hole.
  • The Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) on-board the INTEGRAL satellite has, as one of its scientific goals, the observation of a large number of variable sources previously selected. After almost 6 years of operations, OMC has monitored more than 100 000 sources of scientific interest. In this contribution we present the OMC Scientific Archive (http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/omc/) which has been developed to provide the astronomical community with a quick access to the light curves generated by this instrument.We describe the main characteristics of this archive, as well as important aspects for the users: object types, temporal sampling of light curves and photometric accuracy.
  • The Optical Monitoring Camera on-board INTEGRAL (OMC) provides Johnson V band photometry of any potentially variable source within its field of view. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL capabilities allowing the simultaneous observation of different kind of objects in the optical, X and gamma rays bands, we have performed a study of the optical counterparts of different high-energy sources. Up to now, OMC has detected the optical counterpart for more than 100 sources from the High Energy Catalog (Ebisawa et al., 2003). The photometrically calibrated light curves produced by OMC can be accessed through our web portal at: http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/omc