• We report the results of an observational study aimed at searching for magnetic pulsating hot stars suitable for magneto-asteroseismology. A sample of sixteen chemically peculiar stars was selected and analysed using both high-resolution spectropolarimetry with ESPaDOnS and K2 high-precision space photometry. For all stars, we derive the effective temperature, surface gravity, rotational and non-rotational line broadening from our spectropolarimetric data. High-quality K2 light curves were obtained for thirteen of the sixteen stars and revealed rotational modulation, providing accurate rotation periods. Two stars show evidence for roAp pulsations, and one star shows signatures of internal gravity waves or unresolved g-mode pulsations. We confirm the presence of a large-scale magnetic field for eleven of the studied stars, of which nine are first detections. Further, we report one marginal detection and four non-detections. Two of the stars with a non-detected magnetic field show rotational modulation due to surface abundance inhomogeneities in the K2 light curve, and we confirm that the other two are chemically peculiar. Thus, these five stars likely host a weak (undetected) large-scale magnetic field.
  • We present the initial results of the Large Impact of magnetic Fields on the Evolution of hot stars (LIFE) project. The focus of this project is the search for magnetic fields in evolved OBA giants and supergiants with visual magnitudes between 4 and 8, with the aim to investigate how the magnetic fields observed in upper main sequence (MS) stars evolve from the MS until the late post-MS stages. In this paper, we present spectropolarimetric observations of 15 stars observed using the ESPaDOnS instrument of the CFHT. For each star, we have determined the fundamental parameters and have used stellar evolution models to calculate their mass, age and radius. Using the LSD technique, we have produced averaged line profiles for each star. From these profiles, we have measured the longitudinal magnetic field strength and have calculated the detection probability. We report the detection of magnetic fields in two stars of our sample: a weak field of $B_l=1.0\pm0.2\,$G is detected in the post-MS A5 star 19$\,$Aur and a stronger field of $B_l=-230\,\pm\,10\,$G is detected in the MS/post-MS B8/9 star HR$\,$3042.
  • Massive stars play a significant role in the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies. However, much of their variability, particularly during their evolved supergiant stage, is poorly understood. To understand the variability of evolved massive stars in more detail, we present a study of the O9.2Ib supergiant $\zeta$ Ori Aa, the only currently confirmed supergiant to host a magnetic field. We have obtained two-color space-based BRIght Target Explorer photometry (BRITE) for $\zeta$ Ori Aa during two observing campaigns, as well as simultaneous ground-based, high-resolution optical CHIRON spectroscopy. We perform a detailed frequency analysis to detect and characterize the star's periodic variability. We detect two significant, independent frequencies, their higher harmonics, and combination frequencies: the stellar rotation period $P_{\mathrm{rot}} = 6.82\pm0.18$ d, most likely related to the presence of the stable magnetic poles, and a variation with a period of $10.0\pm0.3$ d attributed to circumstellar environment, also detected in the H$\alpha$ and several He I lines, yet absent in the purely photospheric lines. We confirm the variability with $P_{\mathrm{rot}}$/4, likely caused by surface inhomogeneities, being the possible photospheric drivers of the discrete absorption components. No stellar pulsations were detected in the data. The level of circumstellar activity clearly differs between the two BRITE observing campaigns. We demonstrate that $\zeta$ Ori Aa is a highly variable star with both periodic and non-periodic variations, as well as episodic events. The rotation period we determined agrees well with the spectropolarimetric value from the literature. The changing activity level observed with BRITE could explain why the rotational modulation of the magnetic measurements was not clearly detected at all epochs.
  • We present the analysis performed on spectropolarimetric data of 97 O-type targets included in the framework of the MiMeS (Magnetism in Massive Stars) Survey. Mean Least-Squares Deconvolved Stokes I and V line profiles were extracted for each observation, from which we measured the radial velocity, rotational and non-rotational broadening velocities, and longitudinal magnetic field. The investigation of the Stokes I profiles led to the discovery of 2 new multi-line spectroscopic systems (HD46106, HD204827) and confirmed the presence of a suspected companion in HD37041. We present a modified strategy of the Least-Squares Deconvolution technique aimed at optimising the detection of magnetic signatures while minimising the detection of spurious signatures in Stokes V. Using this analysis, we confirm the detection of a magnetic field in 6 targets previously reported as magnetic by the MiMeS collaboration (HD108, HD47129A2, HD57682, HD148937, CPD-28 2561, and NGC 1624-2), as well as report the presence of signal in Stokes V in 3 new magnetic candidates (HD36486, HD162978, HD199579). Overall, we find a magnetic incidence rate of 7+/-3%, for 108 individual O stars (including all O-type components part of multi-line systems), with a median uncertainty of the longitudinal field measurements of about 50\,G. An inspection of the data reveals no obvious biases affecting the incidence rate or the preference for detecting magnetic signatures in the magnetic stars. Similar to A- and B-type stars, we find no link between the stars' physical properties (e.g. Teff, mass, age) and the presence of a magnetic field. However, the Of?p stars represent a distinct class of magnetic O-type stars.
  • The peculiar emission-line star MWC 137 with its extended optical nebula was recently classified as B[e] supergiant. To study the spatial distribution of its circumstellar molecular gas on small and large scales, we obtained near-infrared and radio observations using SINFONI and APEX, respectively. We find that the hot CO gas is arranged in moving clumpy ring and shell structures close to the star, while a cold CO envelope is encircling the borders of the optical nebula from the south to the west.
  • The MiMeS project is a large-scale, high resolution, sensitive spectropolarimetric investigation of the magnetic properties of O and early B type stars. Initiated in 2008 and completed in 2013, the project was supported by 3 Large Program allocations, as well as various programs initiated by independent PIs and archival resources. Ultimately, over 4800 circularly polarized spectra of 560 O and B stars were collected with the instruments ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Narval at the T\'elescope Bernard Lyot, and HARPSpol at the European Southern Observatory La Silla 3.6m telescope, making MiMeS by far the largest systematic investigation of massive star magnetism ever undertaken. In this paper, the first in a series reporting the general results of the survey, we introduce the scientific motivation and goals, describe the sample of targets, review the instrumentation and observational techniques used, explain the exposure time calculation designed to provide sensitivity to surface dipole fields above approximately 100 G, discuss the polarimetric performance, stability and uncertainty of the instrumentation, and summarize the previous and forthcoming publications.
  • Blue supergiant stars are known to display photometric and spectroscopic variability that is suggested to be linked to stellar pulsations. Pulsational activity in massive stars strongly depends on the star's evolutionary stage and is assumed to be connected with mass-loss episodes, the appearance of macroturbulent line broadening, and the formation of clumps in the wind. To investigate a possible interplay between pulsations and mass-loss, we carried out an observational campaign of the supergiant 55 Cyg over a period of five years to search for photospheric activity and cyclic mass-loss variability in the stellar wind. We modeled the H, He I, Si II and Si III lines using the nonlocal thermal equilibrium atmosphere code FASTWIND and derived the photospheric and wind parameters. In addition, we searched for variability in the intensity and radial velocity of photospheric lines and performed a moment analysis of the line profiles to derive frequencies and amplitudes of the variations. The Halpha line varies with time in both intensity and shape, displaying various types of profiles: P Cygni, pure emission, almost complete absence, and double or multiple peaked. The star undergoes episodes of variable mass-loss rates that change by a factor of 1.7-2 on different timescales. We also observe changes in the ionization rate of Si II and determine a multiperiodic oscillation in the He I absorption lines, with periods ranging from a few hours to 22.5 days. We interpret the photospheric line variations in terms of oscillations in p-, g-, and strange modes. We suggest that these pulsations can lead to phases of enhanced mass loss. Furthermore, they can mislead the determination of the stellar rotation. We classify the star as a post-red supergiant, belonging to the group of alpha Cyg variables.
  • To understand the origin of the magnetic fields in massive stars as well as their impact on stellar internal structure, evolution, and circumstellar environment, within the MiMeS project, we searched for magnetic objects among a large sample of massive stars, and build a sub-sample for in-depth follow-up studies required to test the models and theories of fossil field origins, magnetic wind confinement and magnetospheric properties, and magnetic star evolution. We obtained high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a large number of OB stars thanks to three large programs that have been allocated on the high-resolution spectropolarimeters ESPaDOnS, Narval, and the polarimetric module HARPSpol of the HARPS spectrograph. We report here on the methods and first analysis of the HARPSpol magnetic detections. We identified the magnetic stars using a multi-line analysis technique. Then, when possible, we monitored the new discoveries to derive their rotation periods, which are critical for follow-up and magnetic mapping studies. We also performed a first-look analysis of their spectra and identified obvious spectral anomalies (e.g., abundance peculiarities, Halpha emission), which are also of interest for future studies. In this paper, we focus on eight of the 11 stars in which we discovered or confirmed a magnetic field from the HARPSpol LP sample (the remaining three were published in a previous paper). Seven of the stars were detected in early-type Bp stars, while the last star was detected in the Ap companion of a normal early B-type star. We report obvious spectral and multiplicity properties, as well as our measurements of their longitudinal field strengths, and their rotation periods when we are able to derive them. We also discuss the presence or absence of Halpha emission with respect to the theory of centrifugally-supported magnetospheres. (Abriged)
  • Massive evolved stars in transition phases, such as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), B[e] Supergiants (B[e]SGs), and Yellow Hypergiants (YHGs), are not well understood, and yet crucial steps in determining accurate stellar and galactic evolution models. The circumstellar environments of these stars reveal their mass-loss history, identifying clues to both their individual evolutionary status and the connection between objects of different phases. Here we present a survey of 25 such evolved massive stars (16 B[e]SGs, 6 LBVs, 2 YHGs, and 1 Peculiar Oe star), observed in the K-band with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (SINFONI; R = 4500) on the ESO VLT UT4 8 m telescope. The sample can be split into two categories based on spectral morphology: one group includes all of the B[e]SGs, the Peculiar Oe star, and two of the LBVs, while the other includes the YHGs and the rest of the LBVs. The difference in LBV spectral appearance is due to some objects being in a quiescent phase and some objects being in an active or outburst phase. CO emission features are found in 13 of our targets, with first time detections for MWC 137, LHA 120-S 35, and LHA 115-S 65. From model fits to the CO band heads, the emitting regions appear to be detached from the stellar surface. Each star with ^12CO features also shows ^13CO emission, signaling an evolved nature. Based on the level of ^13C enrichment, we conclude that many of the B[e]SGs are likely in a pre-Red Supergiant phase of their evolution. There appears to be a lower luminosity limit of log L/L_solar = 5.0 below which CO is not detected. The lack of CO features in several high luminosity B[e]SGs and variability in others suggests that they may in fact be LBV candidates, strengthening the connection between these two very similar transition phases.
  • In the framework of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, a HARPSpol Large Program at the 3.6m-ESO telescope has recently started to collect high-resolution spectropolarimetric data of a large number of Southern massive OB stars in the field of the Galaxy and in many young clusters and associations. In this contribution, we present details of the HARPSpol survey, the first HARPSpol discoveries of magnetic fields in massive stars, and the magnetic properties of two previously known magnetic stars.
  • We have obtained 18 new high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the B2Vp star sigma Ori E with both the Narval and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters. The aim of these observations is to test, with modern data, the assumptions of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model of Townsend & Owocki (2005), applied to the specific case of sigma Ori E by Townsend et al. (2005). This model includes a substantially offset dipole magnetic field configuration, and approximately reproduces previous observational variations in longitudinal field strength, photometric brightness, and Halpha emission. We analyze new spectroscopy, including H I, He I, C II, Si III and Fe III lines, confirming the diversity of variability in photospheric lines, as well as the double S-wave variation of circumstellar hydrogen. Using the multiline analysis method of Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), new, more precise longitudinal magnetic field measurements reveal a substantial variance between the shapes of the observed and RRM model time-varying field. The phase resolved Stokes V profiles of He I 5876 A and 6678 A lines are fit poorly by synthetic profiles computed from the magnetic topology assumed by Townsend et al. (2005). These results challenge the offset dipole field configuration assumed in the application of the RRM model to sigma Ori E, and indicate that future models of its magnetic field should also include complex, higher-order components.
  • We report on the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the helium-variable early B-type star HR 7355 using spectropolarimetric data obtained with ESPaDOnS on CFHT by the MiMeS large program. We also present results from new V-band differential photometry obtained with the CTIO 0.9m telescope. We investigate the longitudinal field, using a technique called Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD), and the rotational period of HR 7355. These new observations strongly support the proposal that HR 7355 harbors a structured magnetosphere similar to that in the prototypical helium-strong star, sigma Ori E.
  • This paper presents results obtained from Stokes I and V spectra of the B2Vp star sigma Ori E, observed by both the Narval and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters. Using Least- Squares Deconvolution, we investigate the longitudinal magnetic field at the current epoch, including period analysis exploiting current and historical data. sigma Ori E is the prototypical helium-strong star that has been shown to harbor a strong magnetic field, as well as a magnetosphere, consisting of two clouds of plasma forced by magnetic and centrifugal forces to co-rotate with the star on its 1.19 day period. The Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model of Townsend & Owocki (2005) approximately reproduces the observed variations in longitudinal field strength, photometric brightness, Halpha emission, and various other observables. There are, however, small discrepancies between the observations and model in the photometric light curve, which we propose arise from inhomogeneous chemical abundances on the star's surface. Using Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), future work will attempt to identify the contributions to the photometric variation due to abundance spots and due to circumstellar material.
  • We report the detection of a strong, organized magnetic field in the helium-variable early B-type star HR 7355 using spectropolarimetric data obtained with ESPaDOnS on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope within the context of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) Large Program. HR 7355 is both the most rapidly rotating known main-sequence magnetic star and the most rapidly rotating helium-strong star, with $v \sin i$ = 300 $\pm$ 15 km s$^{-1}$ and a rotational period of 0.5214404 $\pm$ 0.0000006 days. We have modeled our eight longitudinal magnetic field measurements assuming an oblique dipole magnetic field. Constraining the inclination of the rotation axis to be between $38^{\circ}$ and $86^{\circ}$, we find the magnetic obliquity angle to be between $30^{\circ}$ and $85^{\circ}$, and the polar strength of the magnetic field at the stellar surface to be between 13-17 kG. The photometric light curve constructed from HIPPARCOS archival data and new CTIO measurements shows two minima separated by 0.5 in rotational phase and occurring 0.25 cycles before/after the magnetic extrema. This photometric behavior coupled with previously-reported variable emission of the H$\alpha$ line (which we confirm) strongly supports the proposal that HR 7355 harbors a structured magnetosphere similar to that in the prototypical helium-strong star, $\sigma$ Ori E.