• Clues to the physical conditions in radio cores of blazars come from measurements of brightness temperatures as well as effects produced by intrinsic opacity. We study the properties of the ultra compact blazar AO 0235+164 with RadioAstron ground-space radio interferometer, multi-frequency VLBA, EVN and single-dish radio observations. We employ visibility modeling and image stacking for deriving structure and kinematics of the source, and use Gaussian process regression to find the relative multi-band time delays of the flares. The multi-frequency core size and time lags support prevailing synchrotron self absorption. The intrinsic brightness temperature of the core derived from ground-based VLBI is close to the equipartition regime value. In the same time, there is evidence for ultra-compact features of the size of less than 10 $\mu$as in the source, which might be responsible for the extreme apparent brightness temperatures of up to $10^{14}$ K as measured by RadioAstron. In 2007--2016 the VLBI components in the source at 43 GHz are found predominantly in two directions, suggesting a bend of the outflow from southern to northern direction. The apparent opening angle of the jet seen in the stacked image at 43 GHz is two times wider than that at 15 GHz, indicating a collimation of the flow within the central 1.5 mas. We estimate the Lorentz factor $\Gamma = 14$, the Doppler factor $\delta=21$, and the viewing angle $\theta = 1.7^\circ$ of the apparent jet base, derive the gradients of magnetic field strength and electron density in the outflow, and the distance between jet apex and the core at each frequency.
  • We report on the first detection of the theoretically-predicted rare phenomenon of multiple parsec-scale imaging of an active galactic nucleus induced by refractive effects due to localized foreground electron density enhancements, e.g., in an AU-scale plasma lens(es) in the ionized component of the Galactic interstellar medium. We detected multiple imaging in the low galactic latitude (b=-2 deg) quasar 2023+335 from the 15.4 GHz MOJAVE observations when the source was undergoing an ESE. While the parsec-scale jet of the source normally extends along PA -20 deg, in the 28 May 2009 and 23 July 2009 images a highly significant multi-component pattern of secondary images is stretched out nearly along the constant galactic latitude line with a local PA 40 deg, indicating that the direction of relative motion of the plasma lens is close to orbital. Weaker but still detectable imaging patterns at similar position angles are sporadically manifest at several other epochs. Modeling the ESE that occurred in early 2009 and lasted ~0.14 yr, we determined that the foreground screen has a double-lens structure, with proper motion (~6.8 mas/yr), and angular size (~0.27 mas). We also found that the angular separation between the two brightest sub-images roughly follows a wavelength-squared dependence expected from plasma scattering. Furthermore, by analyzing archival non-simultaneous VLBA observations covering a wide frequency range from 1.4 to 86 GHz, we found that the scattered angular size of the VLBI core follows a $\nu^{-1.89}$ dependence, implying the presence of a turbulent, refractive dominated scattering screen that has a confined structure or is truncated transverse to the line of sight toward 2023+335.
  • Since 2005, the blazar 3C 454.3 has shown remarkable flaring activity at all frequencies, and during the last four years it has exhibited more than one gamma-ray flare per year, becoming the most active gamma-ray blazar in the sky. We present for the first time the multi-wavelength AGILE, SWIFT, INTEGRAL, and GASP-WEBT data collected in order to explain the extraordinary gamma-ray flare of 3C 454.3 which occurred in November 2010. On 2010 November 20 (MJD 55520), 3C 454.3 reached a peak flux (E>100 MeV) of F_gamma(p) = (6.8+-1.0)E-5 ph/cm2/s on a time scale of about 12 hours, more than a factor of 6 higher than the flux of the brightest steady gamma-ray source, the Vela pulsar, and more than a factor of 3 brighter than its previous super-flare on 2009 December 2-3. The multi-wavelength data make a thorough study of the present event possible: the comparison with the previous outbursts indicates a close similarity to the one that occurred in 2009. By comparing the broadband emission before, during, and after the gamma-ray flare, we find that the radio, optical and X-ray emission varies within a factor 2-3, whereas the gamma-ray flux by a factor of 10. This remarkable behavior is modeled by an external Compton component driven by a substantial local enhancement of soft seed photons.
  • We report on TeV gamma-ray observations of the blazar Mrk 421 (redshift of 0.031) with the VERITAS observatory and the Whipple 10m Cherenkov telescope. The excellent sensitivity of VERITAS allowed us to sample the TeV gamma-ray fluxes and energy spectra with unprecedented accuracy where Mrk 421 was detected in each of the pointings. A total of 47.3 hrs of VERITAS and 96 hrs of Whipple 10m data were acquired between January 2006 and June 2008. We present the results of a study of the TeV gamma-ray energy spectra as a function of time, and for different flux levels. On May 2nd and 3rd, 2008, bright TeV gamma-ray flares were detected with fluxes reaching the level of 10 Crab. The TeV gamma-ray data were complemented with radio, optical, and X-ray observations, with flux variability found in all bands except for the radio waveband. The combination of the RXTE and Swift X-ray data reveal spectral hardening with increasing flux levels, often correlated with an increase of the source activity in TeV gamma-rays. Contemporaneous spectral energy distributions were generated for 18 nights, each of which are reasonably described by a one-zone SSC model.
  • We discuss the opacity in the core regions of active galactic nuclei observed with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and describe a new method for deriving the frequency-dependent shifts of the VLBI core from the frequency-dependent time lags of flares observed with single-dish observations. Application of the method to the core shifts of the quasar 3C 345 shows a very good agreement between the core shifts directly measured from VLBI observations and derived from flares in the total flux density using the proposed method. The frequency-dependent time lags of flares can be used to derive physical parameters of the jets, such as distance from the VLBI core to the base of the jet and the magnetic fields in the core region. Our estimates for 3C 345 indicate core magnetic fields ~0.1 G and magnetic field at 1 pc ~0.4 G.
  • The radio light curve and spectral evolution of the blazar CTA 102 during its 2006 outburst can be rather well explained by the standard shock-in-jet model. The results of a pixel-to-pixel spectral analysis of multi-frequency VLBI images, together with kinematics derived from the MOJAVE survey lead to the picture of an over-pressured jet with respect to the ambient medium. The interaction of a traveling shock wave with a standing one is a possible scenario which could explain the observed spectral behaviour
  • Context. We present evidence that parsec-scale jets in BL Lac objects may be significantly distinct in kinematics from their counterparts in quasars. We argued this previously for the BL lac sources 1803+784 and 0716+714, report here a similar pattern for another well-known BL Lac object, PKS 0735+178, whose nuclear jet is found to exhibit kinematics atypical of quasars. Aims. A detailed study of the jet components' motion reveals that the standard AGN paradigm of apparent superluminal motion does not always describe the kinematics in BL Lac objects. We study 0735+178 here to augment and improve the understanding of the peculiar motions in the jets of BL Lac objects as a class. Methods. We analyzed 15 GHz VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) observations (2cm/MOJAVE survey) performed at 23 epochs between 1995.27 and 2008.91. Results. We found a drastic structural mode change in the VLBI jet of 0735+178, between 2000.4 and 2001.8 when its twice sharply bent trajectory turned into a linear shape.We further found that this jet had undergone a similar transition sometime between December 1981 and June 1983. A mode change, occurring in the reverse direction (between mid-1992 and mid-1995) has already been reported in the literature. These structural mode changes are found to be reflected in changed kinematical behavior of the nuclear jet, manifested as an apparent superluminal motion and stationarity of the radio knots. In addition, we found the individual mode changes to correlate in time with the maxima in the optical light curve. The last two transitions occurred before a (modest) radio flare. The behavior of this pc-scale jet appears to favor a scenario involving non-ballistic motions of the radio knots, produced by the precession of a continuous jet within the ambient medium.
  • Feb. 4, 2010 astro-ph.HE
    We report on 18 months of multiwavelength observations of the blazar 3C 454.3 (Crazy Diamond) carried out in July 2007-January 2009. We show the results of the AGILE campaigns which took place on May-June 2008, July-August 2008, and October 2008-January 2009. During the May 2008-January 2009 period, the source average flux was highly variable, from an average gamma-ray flux F(E>100MeV) > 200E-8 ph/cm2/s in May-June 2008, to F(E>100MeV)~80E-8 ph/cm2/s in October 2008-January 2009. The average gamma-ray spectrum between 100 MeV and 1 GeV can be fit by a simple power law (Gamma_GRID ~ 2.0 to 2.2). Only 3-sigma upper limits can be derived in the 20-60 keV energy band with Super-AGILE. During July-August 2007 and May-June 2008, RXTE measured a flux of F(3-20 keV)= 8.4E-11 erg/cm2/s, and F(3-20 keV)=4.5E-11 erg/cm2/s, respectively and a constant photon index Gamma_PCA=1.65. Swift/XRT observations were carried out during all AGILE campaigns, obtaining a F(2-10 keV)=(0.9-7.5)E-11 erg/cm2/s and a photon index Gamma_XRT=1.33-2.04. BAT measured an average flux of ~5 mCrab. GASP-WEBT monitored 3C 454.3 during the whole 2007-2008 period from the radio to the optical. A correlation analysis between the optical and the gamma-ray fluxes shows a time lag of tau=-0.4 days. An analysis of 15 GHz and 43 GHz VLBI core radio flux observations shows an increasing trend of the core radio flux, anti- correlated with the higher frequency data. The modeling SEDs, and the behavior of the long-term light curves in different energy bands, allow us to compare the jet properties during different emission states, and to study the geometrical properties of the jet on a time-span longer than one year.
  • For the BL Lac object S5 0716+714 conflicting apparent velocities of jet component motion have been reported in the literature. This object is an intra-day variable source and suited to investigate a possible correlation between kinematic properties and flux-density variability on different timescales. We (re-)analyze 50 VLBI observations obtained with the VLBA at 5 different frequencies (5 to 43 GHz) between 1992.73 and 2006.32. We analyze the jet component motion in detail taking care not only to account for motion in the radial but also in the orthogonal direction. We study the evolution of the jet ridge line and search for correlations between radio band light curves and the kinematic properties of the jet components. We present an alternative kinematic scenario for jet component motion in S5 0716+714 with apparent stationarity of jet components (with regard to their core separation) with time. Jet components, however, do seem to move significantly non-radially with regard to their position angle and in a direction perpendicular to the major axis of the jet. We discuss a possible correlation between the long-term radio flux-density variability and the kinematics. We conclude that a geometric contribution to the origin of the long-term variability might not be negligible. Subluminal motion has been reported for most of the TeV blazars. Our analysis also confirms this for S5 0716+714. This result increases the number of TeV blazars showing apparent subluminal motion to 7.
  • We present a kinematic analysis of jet component motion in the VLBI jet of the BL Lac object S5 1803+784, which does not reveal long-term outward motion for most of the components. Understanding the complex kinematic phenomena can possibly provide insights into the differences between quasars and BL Lac objects. The blazar S5 1803+784 has been studied with VLBI at $\nu$ =1.6, 2.3, 5, 8.4, and 15 GHz between 1993.88 and 2005.68 in 26 observing runs. We (re)analyzed the data and present Gaussian model-fits. We collected the already published kinematic information for this source from the literature and re-identified the components according to the new scenario presented in this paper. Altogether, 94 epochs of observations have been investigated. A careful study of the long-term kinematics reveals a new picture for component motion in S5 1803+784. In contrast to previously discussed motion scenarios, we find that the jet structure within 12 mas of the core can most easily be described by the coexistence of several bright jet features that remain on the long-term at roughly constant core separations (in addition to the already known {\it stationary} jet component $\sim$ 1.4 mas) and one faint component moving with an apparent superluminal speed ($\sim$ 19c, based on 3 epochs). While most of the components maintain long-term roughly constant distances from the core, we observe significant, smooth changes in their position angles. We report on an evolution of the whole jet ridge line with time over the almost 12 years of observations. The width of the jet changes periodically with a period of $\sim$ 8 to 9 years. We find a correlation between changes in the position angle and maxima in the total flux-density. We present evidence for a geometric origin of the phenomena and discuss possible models.
  • We report the discovery of high-energy (E>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the gamma-ray source is only ~3' away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of ~5'.The spatial distribution of gamma-ray photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F_gamma = (2.10+-0.23)x 10^{-7} ph (>100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} and Gamma = 2.17+-0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period.Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F_gamma < 3.72x 10 ^{-8} ph (>100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1} to the gamma-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts the fraction of emission that can be produced in extended regions of the galaxy cluster. Contemporaneous and historical radio observations are also reported. The broadband spectrum of NGC 1275 is modeled with a simple one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model and a model with a decelerating jet flow.
  • The radio loud galaxy NGC 1052 is being studied in an intensive multi-band campaign including X-ray brigthness monitoring and spectroscopic observations, single-dish radio brightness monitoring at centimetre wavelengths, and a high-frequency very-long-baseline interferometry monitoring program. Here we present a progress report on our studies from this program. The final goal of our observations is to relate the findings from the high-resolution radio images with the observed variations in the X-ray regime, to address the accretion processes and their relationship with the radio jet activity.
  • A large number of AGN have been monitored for nearly 30 years at 22, 37 and 87 GHz in Mets\"ahovi Radio Observatory. These data were combined with lower frequency 4.8, 8.0 and 14.5 GHz data from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, higher frequency data at 90 and 230 GHz from SEST, and supplementary higher frequency data from the literature to study the long-term variability of a large sample of AGN. Both the characteristics of individual flares from visual inspection and statistically-determined variability timescales as a function of frequency and optical class type were determined. Based on past behaviour, predictions of sources expected to exhibit large flares in 2008--2009 appropriate for study by GLAST and other instruments are made. The need for long-term data for properly understanding source behaviour is emphasised.
  • The blazar AO 0235+164 was claimed to show a quasi-periodic behaviour in the radio and optical bands. Moreover, an extra emission component contributing to the UV and soft X-ray flux was detected, whose nature is not yet clear. A predicted optical outburst was observed in late 2006/early 2007. We here present the radio-to-optical WEBT light curves during the outburst, together with UV data acquired by Swift in the same period. We found the optical outburst to be as strong as the big outbursts of the past: starting from late September 2006, a brightness increase of 5 mag led to the outburst peak in February 19-21, 2007. We also observed an outburst at mm and then at cm wavelengths, with an increasing time delay going toward lower frequencies during the rising phase. Cross-correlation analysis indicates that the 1 mm and 37 GHz flux variations lagged behind the R-band ones by about 3 weeks and 2 months, respectively. These short time delays suggest that the corresponding jet emitting regions are only slightly separated and/or misaligned. In contrast, during the outburst decreasing phase the flux faded contemporaneously at all cm wavelengths. This abrupt change in the emission behaviour may suggest the presence of some shutdown mechanism of intrinsic or geometric nature. The behaviour of the UV flux closely follows the optical and near-IR one. By separating the synchrotron and extra component contributions to the UV flux, we found that they correlate, which suggests that the two emissions have a common origin.
  • In this letter we present the results of a wavelet analysis of the radio light curve of the BL Lac Object PKS B0048-097 from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory monitoring program at 8GHz during twenty-five years, from 1979 to 2004. The results show a remarkable periodicity of 450-470 days in the early 1980s that changed to a ~585 day periodicity in the late 1980s to early 1990s. A less pronounced ~400 day periodicity is found after \~1995. Very-long-baseline interferometry imaging at 15GHz shows dramatic structural changes in the usually unresolved source between two epochs, 1995.57 and 2002.38. The pronounced northward directed jet seen in the 2002 image differs by more than 90 degrees in direction from the source structure found in earlier epochs. These findings make PKS B0048-097 a primary target for multi-wavelength observations and intensive radio monitoring to decipher the blazar-variability phenomenon.
  • In 1999, the highly compact and variable BL Lac object AO 0235+164 was identified as the highest brightness temperature active galactic nucleus observed with the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP), with T_B > 5.8 x 10^{13} K. The sub-milliarcsecond radio structure of this source has been studied with dual-frequency (1.6 and 5 GHz), polarization-sensitive VSOP observations during 2001 and 2002. Here we present the results of this monitoring campaign. At the time of these observations, the source was weakly polarized and characterized by a radio core that is clearly resolved on space-ground baselines.
  • We have carried out a multifrequency analysis of the radio variability of blazars, exploiting the data obtained during the extensive monitoring programs carried out at the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO, at 4.8, 8, and 14.5 GHz) and at the Metsahovi Radio Observatory (22 and 37 GHz). Two different techniques detect, in the Metsahovi light curves, evidences of periodicity at both frequencies for 5 sources (0224+671, 0945+408, 1226+023, 2200+420, and 2251+158). For the last three sources consistent periods are found also at the three UMRAO frequencies and the Scargle (1982) method yields an extremely low false-alarm probability. On the other hand, the 22 and 37 GHz periodicities of 0224+671 and 0945+408 (which were less extensively monitored at Metsahovi and for which we get a significant false-alarm probability) are not confirmed by the UMRAO database, where some indications of ill-defined periods about a factor of two longer are retrieved. We have also investigated the variability index, the structure function, and the distribution of intensity variations of the most extensively monitored sources. We find a statistically significant difference in the distribution of the variability index for BL Lac objects compared to flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), in the sense that the former objects are more variable. For both populations the variability index steadily increases with increasing frequency. The distribution of intensity variations also broadens with increasing frequency, and approaches a log-normal shape at the highest frequencies. We find that variability enhances by 20-30% the high frequency counts of extragalactic radio-sources at bright flux densities, such as those of the WMAP and Planck surveys.
  • Eight optical and four radio observatories have been intensively monitoring the BL Lac object 0716+714 in the last years: 4854 data points have been collected in the UBVRI bands since 1994, while radio light curves extend back to 1978. Many of these data are presented here for the first time. The long-term trend shown by the optical light curves seems to vary with a characteristic time scale of about 3.3 years, while a longer period of 5.5-6 years seems to characterize the radio long-term variations. In general, optical colour indices are only weakly correlated with brightness. The radio flux behaviour at different frequencies is similar, but the flux variation amplitude decreases with increasing wavelength. The radio spectral index varies with brightness (harder when brighter), but the radio fluxes seem to be the sum of two different-spectrum contributions: a steady base level and a harder-spectrum variable component. Once the base level is removed, the radio variations appear as essentially achromatic, similarly to the optical behaviour. Flux variations at the higher radio frequencies lead the lower-frequency ones with week-month time scales. The behaviour of the optical and radio light curves is quite different, the broad radio outbursts not corresponding in time to the faster optical ones and the cross-correlation analysis indicating only weak correlation with long time lags. However, minor radio flux enhancements simultaneous with the major optical flares can be recognized, which may imply that the mechanism producing the strong flux increases in the optical band also marginally affects the radio one.
  • We present the results of the BeppoSAX observations of two BL Lacs, OQ 530 and S5 0716+714, as part of a ToO program for the simultaneous observation at radio, optical, X-ray and TeV energies. Both sources are detected in the LECS and MECS, with S5 0716+714 visible also in the PDS band, up to about 60 keV. The X-ray spectra of both sources are better fitted by a double power-law model, with a steep soft X-ray component flattening at harder energies, with breaks at 0.3 and 1.5 keV, respectively. The concave shape of the spectra in both objects is consistent with soft X-rays being produced by the synchrotron and harder X-rays by the inverse Compton processes. Also the X-ray variability properties confirm this scenario, in particular for S5 0716+714 our observation shows variations by about a factor 3 over one hour below 3 keV and no variability above. Their simultaneous broad band energy spectral distributions can be successfully interpreted within the frame of a homogeneous synchrotron and inverse Compton model, including a possible contribution from an external source of seed photons with the different spectral states of S5 0716+714 being reproduced by changing the injected power. The resulting parameters are fully consistent with the two sources being intermediate objects within the "sequence" scenario proposed for blazars.
  • Using UMRAO centimeter-band total flux density and linear polarization monitoring observations of the complete Pearson-Readhead extragalactic source sample obtained between August 1984 and March 2001, we identify the range of variability in extragalactic objects as functions of optical and radio morphological classification, and relate total flux density variations to structural changes in published coeval VLBI maps in selected objects. We have identified preferred orientations of the electric vector of the polarized emission at 14.5 and 4.8 GHz in roughly half of the objects, and compared these with orientations of the flow direction indicated by VLBI morphology. When comparing the distributions of the orientation offsets for the BL Lacs and for the QSOs, we find differences in both range and mean value, in support of intrinsic class differences. In the shock-in-jet scenario, we attribute this to the allowed range of obliquities of shocks developing in the flow relative to the flow direction. The fact that we find longterm stability in EVPA over many events implies that a dominant magnetic field orientation persists; in the core-dominated objects, with small contribution from the underlying quiescent jet, this plausibly suggests that the magnetic field has a longterm memory, with subsequent shock events exhibiting similar EVPA orientation, or, alternatively, the presence of a standing shock in the core. We have looked for systematic, monotonic changes in EVPA which might be expected in the emission from a precessing jet, a model currently invoked for some AGNs; none were identified. Further, we carried out a Scargle periodogram analysis of the total flux density observations, but found no strong evidence for periodicity in any of the sample sources.
  • We interpret the linear polarization structures observed in extragalactic radio sources, even those oriented at oblique angles to the jet flows, to be due to oblique, relativistic shock fronts in the emitting regions. Many sources exhibit indications of such oblique structures, and the goal of this investigation is to test this hypothesis quantitatively. A selected group of ten highly-variable extragalactic sources were observed with the VLBA at 15 and 43 GHz, on nine epochs spanning a 30-month period; five of these objects were also observed at 8.0 and 22 GHz. The integrated total flux densities and linear polarizations of the selected objects were also observed several times a month at 4.8, 8.0 and 14.5 GHz with the University of Michigan 26-meter telescope. All objects exhibited variability with several exhibiting more than one independent outburst during the period. We show the evolution of the polarized components with time and discuss the relativistic shock parameters required to match the observed polarization structures. Even cases where the magnetic field is apparently oriented along the jet flow can be fit by oblique shock models when relativistic aberration effects are included.
  • Monitoring results are presented for the Stangellini 1 Jy GHz-peaked-spectrum source sample, illustrating that several members exhibit variability in total flux and/or linear polarization over timescales of order a decade. The variability occurs while the spectrum, based on the integrated fluxes, remains steep and characteristic of a transparent source. Total flux variability is unexpected in view of recent VLBI observations indicating no or hidden cores in several members. However, both the variability, and the detection of circular polarization in one class member, argue for the presence of opacity in some portion of the radio jet.
  • New optical and radio data on the BL Lacertae object AO 0235+16 have been collected in the last four years by a wide international collaboration, which confirm the intense activity of this source. The optical data also include the results of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) first-light campaign organized in November 1997. The optical spectrum is observed to basically steepen when the source gets fainter. We have investigated the existence of typical variability time scales and of possible correlations between the optical and radio emissions by means of visual inspection, Discrete Correlation Function analysis, and Discrete Fourier Transform technique. The major radio outbursts are found to repeat quasi-regularly with a periodicity of about 5.7 years; this period is also in agreement with the occurrence of some of the major optical outbursts, but not all of them.
  • AO 0235+164 is a very compact, flat spectrum radio source identified as a BL Lac object at a redshift of z=0.94. It is one of the most violently variable extragalactic objects at both optical and radio wavelengths. The radio structure of the source revealed by various ground-based VLBI observations is dominated by a nearly unresolved compact component at almost all available frequencies. Dual-frequency space VLBI observations of AO 0235+164 were made with the VSOP mission in January-February 1999. The array of the Japanese HALCA satellite and co-observing ground radio telescopes in Australia, Japan, China and South Africa allowed us to study AO 0235+164 with an unprecedented angular resolution at frequencies of 1.6 and 5 GHz. We report on the sub-milliarcsecond structural properties of the source. The 5-GHz observations led to an estimate of T_B > 5.8 x 10^{13} K for the rest-frame brightness temperature of the core, which is the highest value measured with VSOP to date.
  • We present a wide multi-wavelength database of most observations of the quasar 3C 273 obtained during the last 30 years. This database is the most complete set of observations available for an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It contains nearly 20'000 observations grouped together into 70 light curves covering 16 orders of magnitude in frequency from the radio to the gamma-ray domain. The database is constituted of many previously unpublished observations and of most publicly available data gathered in the literature and on the World Wide Web (WWW). It is complete to the best of our knowledge, except in the optical (UBV) domain where we chose not to add all observations from the literature. In addition to the photometric data, we present the spectra of 3C 273 obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. In the X-ray domain, we used the spectral fit parameters from the literature to construct the light curves. Apart from describing the data, we show the most representative light curves and the average spectrum of 3C 273. The database is available on the WWW in a homogeneous and clear form and we wish to update it regularly by adding new observations.