• The microquasar GRS1915+105 was observed by BeppoSAX in October 2000 for about ten days while the source was in \rho-mode, which is characterized by a quasi-regular type I bursting activity. This paper presents a systematic analysis of the delay of the hard and soft X-ray emission at the burst peaks. The lag, also apparent from the comparison of the [1.7-3.4] keV light curves with those in the [6.8-10.2] keV range, is evaluated and studied as a function of time, spectral parameters, and flux. We apply the limit cycle mapping technique, using as independent variables the count rate and the mean photon rate. The results using this technique were also cross-checked using a more standard approach with the cross-correlation methods. Data are organized in runs, each relative to a continuous observation interval. The detected hard-soft delay changes in the course of the pointing from about 3 s to about 10 s and presents a clear correlation with the baseline count rate.
  • An extensive theoretical literature predicts that X-ray Polarimetry can directly determine relevant physical and geometrical parameters of astrophysical sources, and discriminate between models further than allowed by spectral and timing data only. X-ray Polarimetry can also provide tests of Fundamental Physics. A high sensitivity polarimeter in the focal plane of a New Generation X-ray telescope could open this new window in the High Energy Sky.
  • The sky region containing the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1627-41 has been observed three times with XMM-Newton in February and September 2004. SGR 1627-41 has been detected with an absorbed flux of ~9x10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} (2-10 keV). For a distance of 11 kpc, this corresponds to a luminosity of ~3x10^{33} erg s^{-1}, the smallest ever observed for a Soft Gamma Repeater and possibly related to the long period of inactivity of this source. The observed flux is smaller than that seen with Chandra in 2001-2003, suggesting that the source was still fading and had not yet reached a steady quiescent level. The spectrum is equally well fit by a steep power law (photon index \~3.2) or by a blackbody with temperature kT~0.8 keV. We also report on the INTEGRAL transient IGR J16358-4726 that lies at ~10' from SGR 1627-41. It was detected only in September 2004 with a luminosity of ~4x10^{33} erg s^{-1} (for d=7 kpc), while in February 2004 it was at least a factor 10 fainter.
  • We have observed with the BeppoSAX satellite the quiescent counterpart of the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater SGR 1806-20. Observations performed in October 1998 and in March 1999 showed that this pulsar continued its long term spin-down trend at an average rate of ~8 10e-11 s/s while its flux and spectrum remained remarkably constant between the two observations, despite the soft gamma-ray bursting activity that occurred in this period. We also reanalyzed archival ASCA data, that when compared with the new BeppoSAX observations, show evidence for a long term variation in luminosity.
  • We describe the AGILE gamma-ray astronomy satellite which has recently been selected as the first Small Scientific Mission of the Italian Space Agency. With a launch in 2002, AGILE will provide a unique tool for high-energy astrophysics in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV range before GLAST. Despite the much smaller weight and dimensions, the scientific performances of AGILE are comparable to those of EGRET.
  • The BeppoSAX satellite has recently opened a new way towards the solution of the long standing gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs) enigma, providing accurate coordinates few hours after the event thus allowing for multiwavelength follow-up observational campaigns. The BeppoSAX Narrow Field Instruments observed the region of sky containing GRB970111 16 hours after the burst. In contrast to other GRBs observed by BeppoSAX no bright afterglow was unambiguously observed. A faint source (1SAXJ1528.1+1937) is detected in a position consistent with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera position, but unconsistent with the IPN annulus. Whether 1SAXJ1528.1+1937 is associated with GRB970111 or not, the X-ray intensity of the afterglow is significantly lower than expected, based on the properties of the other BeppoSAX GRB afterglows. Given that GRB970111 is one of the brightest GRBs observed, this implies that there is no obvious relation between the GRB gamma-ray peak flux and the intensity of the X-ray afterglow.