• We calculate the nucleon parameters in symmetric nuclear matter employing the QCD sum rules approach. We focus on the average energy per nucleon and study the equilibrium states of the latter. We treat the matter as a relativistic system of interacting nucleons. Assuming the dependence of the nucleon mass on the light quark mass $m_q$ to be more important than that of nucleon interactions we find that the contribution of the relativistic nucleons to the scalar condensate can be expressed as that caused by free nucleons at rest multiplied by the density dependent factor $F(\rho)$. We demonstrate that there are no equilibrium states while we include only the condensates with dimension $d\leq 3$. There are equilibrium states if we include the lowest order radiative corrections and the condensates with $d\leq 4$. They manifest themselves for the nucleon sigma term $\sigma_N >60$ MeV. Including the condensates with $d\leq 6$ we find equilibrium states for $\sigma_N> 41$ MeV. In all cases the equilibrium states are due to relativistic effects since the equilibrium can not be reached if one puts $F(\rho)=1$.
  • We compare the rapidity, $y$, and the beam energy, $\sqrt{s}$, behaviours of the cross section of the data for $D$ meson production in the forward direction that were measured by the LHCb collaboration. We describe the observed cross sections using NLO perturbative QCD, and choose the optimal factorization scale for the LO contribution which provides the resummation of the large double logarithms. We emphasize the inconsistency observed in the $y$ and $\sqrt{s}$ behaviours of the $D$ meson cross sections. The $y$ behaviour indicates a very {\it flat} $x$ dependence of the gluon PDF in the unexplored low $x$ region around $x\sim 10^{-5}$. However, to describe the $\sqrt{s}$ dependence of the data we need a steeper gluon PDF with decreasing $x$. Moreover, an even steeper behaviour is needed to provide an extrapolation which matches on to the well known gluons found in the global PDF analyses for $x\sim 10^{-3}$. The possible role of non-perturbative effects is briefly discussed.
  • Bose-Einstein correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC are well descried by the formula with two different scales. It is shown for the first time that the pions are produced by few small size sources distributed over a much larger area in impact parameter space occupied by the interaction amplitude. The dependence of the two radii obtained in this procedure on the charged particle density and the mean transverse momentum of the pion/hadron in the correlated pair are discussed.
  • We argue that the so-called maximal Odderon contribution breaks the `black disk' behaviour of the asymptotic amplitude, since the cross section of the events with Large Rapidity Gaps grows faster than the total cross section. That is the `maximal Odderon' is not consistent with the unitarity.
  • Observations of rare processes containing large rapidity gaps at high energy colliders may be exceptionally informative. However the cross sections of these events are small in comparison with that for the inclusive processes since there is a large probability that the gaps may be filled by secondary particles arising from additional soft interactions or from gluon radiation. Here we review the calculations of the probability that the gaps survive population by particles from these effects for a wide range of different processes.
  • The predictions of a model which was tuned in 2013 to describe the elastic and diffractive $pp$- and/or $p\bar p$-data at collider energies up to 7 TeV are compared with the new 13 TeV TOTEM results. The possibility of an odd-signature Odderon exchange contribution is discussed.
  • We use the very forward neutron energy spectra measured by the Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment at 7 TeV to extract the $\pi^+ p$ total cross section at centre-of-mass energies in the range 2.3$-$3.5 TeV. To do this we have to first isolate the $\pi$-exchange pole in forward neutron production in $pp$ collisions, by evaluating other possible contributions. Namely, those from $\rho$ and $a_2$ exchange, from both eikonal and enhanced screening effects, from migration, from neutron production by $\Delta$-isobar decay and from diffractive nucleon excitations. We discuss the possible theoretical uncertainties due to the fact that the data do not exactly reach the $\pi$ pole. We choose the kinematical domain where the pion contribution dominates and demonstrate the role of the different corrections which could affect the final result.
  • We use the LHCb data on the forward production of $D$ mesons at 7, 13 and 5 TeV to make a direct determination of the gluon distribution, $xg$, at NLO in the $10^{-5} \lesssim x \lesssim 10^{-4}$ region. We first use a simple parametrization of the gluon density in each of the four transverse momentum intervals of the detected $D$ mesons. Second, we use a double log parametrization to make a combined fit to all the LHCb $D$ meson data. The values found for $xg$ in the above $x$ domain are of the similar magnitude (or a bit larger) than the central values of extrapolations of the gluons obtained by the global PDF analyses into this small $x$ region. However, in contrast, we find $xg$ has a weak dependence on $x$.
  • The large mass of the $\eta'$ meson indicates that a sizeable gluon component is present in the meson wave function. However, the $\chi_{c0}$ and $\chi_{c2}$ decays to $\eta'$ mesons, which proceed via a purely gluonic intermediate state and we would therefore na\"{i}vely expect to be enhanced by such a component, are in fact relatively suppressed. We argue that this apparent contradiction may be resolved by a proper treatment of interference effects in the decay. In particular, by accounting for the destructive interference between the quark and gluon components of the $\eta'$ distribution function, in combination with a model for strange quark mass effects, we demonstrate that the observed $\chi_{c(0,2)}\to\eta(')\eta(')$ branching ratios can be reproduced for a reasonable gluon component of the $\eta'$, $\eta$ mesons.
  • To obtain more precise parton distribution functions (PDFs) it is important to include data on inclusive high transverse energy jet production in the global parton analyses. These data have high statistics and the NNLO terms in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) description are now available. Our aim is to reduce the uncertainty in the comparison of the jet data with pQCD. To ensure the best convergence of the pQCD series it is important to choose the appropriate factorization scales, $\mu_F$. We show that it is possible to absorb and resum in the incoming PDFs and fragmentation function ($D$) an essential part of the higher $\alpha_s$ order corrections by determining the `optimal' values of $\mu_F$. We emphasize that it is necessary to optimize different factorization scales for the various factors in the cross section: indeed, both of the PDFs, and also the fragmentation function, have their own optimal scale. We show how the values of these scales can be calculated for the LO (NLO) part of the pQCD prediction of the cross section based on the theoretically known NLO (NNLO) corrections. After these scales are fixed at their optimal values, the residual factorization scale dependence is much reduced.
  • The `optimal' factorization scale $\mu_0$ is calculated for open heavy quark production. We find that the optimal value is $\mu_F=\mu_0\simeq 0.85\sqrt{p^2_T+m_Q^2} $; a choice which allows us to resum the double-logarithmic, $(\alpha_s\ln\mu^2_F\ln(1/x))^n$ corrections (enhanced at LHC energies by large values of $\ln(1/x)$) and to move them into the incoming parton distributions, PDF$(x,\mu_0^2)$. Besides this result for the single inclusive cross section (corresponding to an observed heavy quark of transverse momentum $p_T$), we also determined the scale for processes where the acoplanarity can be measured; that is, events where the azimuthal angle between the quark and the antiquark may be determined experimentally. Moreover, we discuss the important role played by the $2\to 2$ subprocesses, $gg\to Q\bar{Q}$ at NLO and higher orders. In summary, we achieve a better stability of the QCD calculations, so that the data on $c\bar{c}$ and $b\bar{b}$ production can be used to further constrain the gluons in the small $x$, relatively low scale, domain, where the uncertainties of the global analyses are large at present.
  • We discuss the possibility of identifying invisible objects (e.g. dark matter) via missing mass in Central Exclusive Processes; that is, in events where only forward protons are detected at the LHC. We show that the signal must have a cross section greater than 0.25 fb in order that it can be detected. We estimate the huge background caused by soft proton dissociation and evaluate the requirements of the detector `veto' system needed to sufficiently suppress these events. In addition, we discuss the related process leading to the possible identification of the particles from the so-called `compressed-mass Beyond the Standard Model (BSM)' scenarios. In this case the background is not so severe.
  • The recent LHCb data for exclusive $J/\psi$ peripheral production at 13 TeV motivate an improved `NLO' analysis to estimate the gluon distribution at low $x$ in which we re-calculate the rapidity gap survival factors and use a more precise expression for the photon flux. We comment on the difference between the $k_T$ and collinear factorization approaches.
  • We explore the method of using the measured jet activity associated with a high mass resonance state to determine the corresponding production modes. To demonstrate the potential of the approach, we consider the case of a resonance of mass $M_R$ decaying to a diphoton final state. We perform a Monte Carlo study, considering three mass points $M_R=0.75,\,1.5\,,2.5$ TeV, and show that the $\gamma\gamma$, $WW$, $gg$ and light and heavy $q\overline{q}$ initiated cases lead to distinct predictions for the jet multiplicity distributions. As an example, we apply this result to the ATLAS search for resonances in diphoton events, using the 2015 data set of $3.2\,{\rm fb}^{-1}$ at $\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV. Taking the spin-0 selection, we demonstrate that a dominantly $gg$-initiated signal hypothesis is mildly disfavoured, while the $\gamma\gamma$ and light quark cases give good descriptions within the limited statistics, and a dominantly $WW$-initiated hypothesis is found to be in strong tension with the data. We also comment on the $b\overline{b}$ initial state, which can already be constrained by the measured $b$-jet multiplicity. Finally, we present expected exclusion limits with integrated luminosity, and demonstrate that with just a few 10's of ${\rm fb}^{-1}$ we can expect to constrain the production modes of such a resonance.
  • The perturbative QCD expansion for $J/\psi$ photoproduction appears to be unstable: the NLO correction is large (and of opposite sign) to the LO contribution. Moreover, the predictions are very sensitive to the choice of factorization and renormalization scales. Here we show that perturbative stability is greatly improved by imposing a $`Q_0$ cut' on the NLO coefficient functions; a cut which is required to avoid double counting. $Q_0$ is the input scale used in the parton DGLAP evolution. This result opens the possibility of high precision exclusive $J/\psi$ data in the forward direction at the LHC being able to determine the low $x$ gluon distribution at low scales.
  • We consider the influence of photon-initiated processes on high-mass particle production. We discuss in detail the photon PDF at relatively high parton $x$, relevant to such processes, and evaluate its uncertainties. In particular we show that, as the dominant contribution to the input photon distribution is due to coherent photon emission, at phenomenologically relevant scales the photon PDF is already well determined in this region, with the corresponding uncertainties under good control. We then demonstrate the implications of this result for the example processes of high-mass lepton and $W$ boson pair production at the LHC and FCC. While for the former process the photon-initiated contribution is expected to be small, in the latter case we find that it is potentially significant, in particular at larger masses.
  • We address the question as to whether data for J/\psi mesons produced exclusively in the forward direction at the LHC can be used in global parton analyses (based on collinear factorization) to pin down the low x gluon PDF. We show that it may be possible to overcome the problems that (i) the process is described by a skewed or Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD), (ii) it is very sensitive to the choice of factorization scale and (iii) there is bad LO, NLO,... perturbative stability to the predictions. However, we start by briefly explaining how the alternative k_T factorization approach has been used to describe the process.
  • We consider the dynamics of high energy multiparticle production and discuss how the space-time picture of inelastic interaction may reveal itself in identical particles Bose-Einstein correlations.
  • We recall that the exclusive production of high mass objects via \gamma\gamma fusion at the LHC is not strongly suppressed in comparison with inclusive \gamma\gamma fusion. Therefore it may be promising to study new objects produced by the \gamma\gamma subprocess in experiments with exclusive kinematics. We list the main advantages of exclusive experiments. We discuss the special advantage of observing $\gamma\gamma \to X \to \gamma Z$ exclusive events.
  • We argue that the secondaries produced in high energy hadron collisions are emitted by small size sources distributed over a much larger area in impact parameter space occupied by the interaction amplitude. That is, Bose-Einstein correlation of two emitted identical particles should be described by a `two-radii' parametrization ansatz. We discuss the expected energy, charged multiplicity and transverse momentum of the pair (that is, $\sqrt{s},~N_{\rm ch}, k_t$) behaviour of both the small and large size components.
  • We study the prompt production of the $\chi_c(1^+)$ and $\chi_b(1^+)$ mesons at high energies. Unlike $\chi(0^+,2^+)$ production, $\chi (1^+)$ mesons cannot be created at LO via the fusion of two on-mass-shell gluons, that is $gg\to\chi_{c,b}(1^+)$ are not allowed. However, the available experimental data show that the cross sections for $\chi_c(1^+)$ and $\chi_c(2^+)$ are comparable. We therefore investigate four other $\chi(1^+)$ production mechanisms: namely, (i) the standard NLO process $gg\to\chi_{c,b}(1^+)+g$, (ii) via gluon virtuality, (iii) via gluon reggeization and, finally, (iv) the possibility to form $\chi_{c,b}(1^+)$ by the fusion of three gluons, where one extra gluon comes from another parton cascade, as in the Double Parton Scattering processes.
  • We study exclusive vector meson photoproduction, $\gamma p \to V + p$ with $V=J/\psi$ or $\Upsilon$, at NLO in collinear factorisation, in order to examine what may be learnt about the gluon distribution at very low $x$. We examine the factorisation scale dependence of the predictions. We argue that, using knowledge of the NLO corrections, terms enhanced by a large $\ln(1/\xi)$ can be reabsorbed in the LO part by a choice of the factorisation scale. (In these exclusive processes $\xi$ takes the role of Bjorken-$x$.) Then, the scale dependence coming from the remaining NLO contributions has no $\ln(1/\xi)$ enhancements. As a result, we find that predictions for the amplitude of $\Upsilon$ production are stable to within about $\pm 15\%$. This will allow data for the exclusive process $p p \to p\Upsilon p$ at the LHC, particularly from LHCb, to be included in global parton analyses to constrain the gluon PDF down to $x\sim 10^{-5}$. Moreover, the study of exclusive $J/\psi$ photoproduction indicates that the gluon density found in the recent global PDF analyses is too small at low $x$ and low scales.
  • Bose-Einstein correlations of identical hadrons produced in high- energy pp collisions at the LHC is a good instrument to probe the size of the domain which emits these hadrons in different classes of events. This provides an additional information on the dynamics of multiparticle production. In particular this way we may measure the radius of the colour tube/string which create the secondary pions.
  • We review recent results within the Durham model of central exclusive production. We discuss the theoretical aspects of this approach and consider the phenomenological implications in a variety of processes, comparing to existing collider data and addressing the possibilities for the future.
  • We present the first calculation of exclusive double $J/\psi$ production in hadronic collisions. We analyse in detail the form of the Born-level $gg \to J/\psi J/\psi$ amplitudes within the non-relativistic quarkonium approximation and discuss the implications of this for the central exclusive production channel, within the `Durham' perturbative model. In addition we show that this direct single parton scattering contribution is expected to be strongly dominant in the exclusive case. We present predictions for the LHC and show that the expected cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the LHCb Run-I measurement of exclusive double $J/\psi$ production, with the measured invariant mass distribution described well by the theory. Motivated by this encouraging result we present predictions for observables that may be measured in LHC Run-II, and estimate the size of the expected cross sections in the $\psi(2S)$ and $\chi_{c}$ cases.