• Due to their large dynamical mass-to-light ratios, dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) in gamma-rays. We examine their detectability by present and future gamma-ray observatories. The key innovative features of our analysis are: (i) We take into account the angular size of the dSphs; while nearby objects have higher gamma ray flux, their larger angular extent can make them less attractive targets for background-dominated instruments. (ii) We derive DM profiles and the astrophysical J-factor (which parameterises the expected gamma-ray flux, independently of the choice of DM particle model) for the classical dSphs directly from photometric and kinematic data. We assume very little about the DM profile, modelling this as a smooth split-power law distribution, with and without sub-clumps. (iii) We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to marginalise over unknown parameters and determine the sensitivity of our derived J-factors to both model and measurement uncertainties. (iv) We use simulated DM profiles to demonstrate that our J-factor determinations recover the correct solution within our quoted uncertainties. Our key findings are: (i) Sub-clumps in the dSphs do not usefully boost the signal; (ii) The sensitivity of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to dSphs within 20 kpc with cored halos can be up to ~50 times worse than when estimated assuming them to be point-like. Even for the satellite-borne Fermi-LAT the sensitivity is significantly degraded on the relevant angular scales for long exposures, hence it is vital to consider the angular extent of the dSphs when selecting targets; (iii) No DM profile has been ruled out by current data, but using a prior on the inner dark matter cusp slope 0<=gamma<=1 provides J-factor estimates accurate to a factor of a few if an appropriate angular scale [abridged]
  • We present a new analysis of the relative detectability of dark matter annihilation in the Milky Way's eight classical dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. Ours is similar to previous analyses in that we use Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques to fit dark matter halo parameters to empirical velocity dispersion profiles via the spherical Jeans equation, but more general in the sense that we do not adopt priors derived from cosmological simulations. We show that even without strong constraints on the shapes of dSph dark matter density profiles (we require only that the inner profile satisfies -lim(r->0) [dlnrho/dln r] <=1), we obtain a robust and accurate constraint on the astrophysical component of a prospective dark matter annihilation signal, provided that the integration angle is approximately twice the projected half-light radius of the dSph divided by distance to the observer, alpha_int~2rh/d. Using this integration angle, which represents a compromise between maximizing prospective flux and minimizing uncertainty in the dSph's dark matter distribution, we calculate the relative detectability of the classical dSphs by ground- and space-based gamma-ray observatories.
  • As massive black holes (MBHs) grow from lower-mass seeds, it is natural to expect that a leftover population of progenitor MBHs should also exist in the present universe. Dwarf galaxies undergo a quiet merger history, and as a result, we expect that dwarfs observed in the local Universe retain some `memory' of the original seed mass distribution. Consequently, the properties of MBHs in nearby dwarf galaxies may provide clean indicators of the efficiency of MBH formation. In order to examine the properties of MBHs in dwarf galaxies, we evolve different MBH populations within a Milky Way halo from high-redshift to today. We consider two plausible MBH formation mechanisms: `massive seeds' formed via gas-dynamical instabilities and a Population III remnant seed model. `Massive seeds' have larger masses than PopIII remnants, but form in rarer hosts. We dynamically evolve all halos merging with the central system, taking into consideration how the interaction modifies the satellites, stripping their outer mass layers. We compute different properties of the MBH population hosted in these satellites. We find that for the most part MBHs retain the original mass, thus providing a clear indication of what the properties of the seeds were. We derive the black hole occupation fraction (BHOF) of the satellite population at z=0. MBHs generated as `massive seeds' have large masses that would favour their identification, but their typical BHOF is always below 40 per cent and decreases to less than per cent for observed dwarf galaxy sizes. In contrast, Population III remnants have a higher BHOF, but their masses have not grown much since formation, inhibiting their detection.