• Investigations of the origin and evolution of the Milky Way disk have long relied on chemical and kinematic identification of its components to reconstruct our Galactic past. Difficulties in determining precise stellar ages have restricted most studies to small samples, normally confined to the solar neighbourhood. Here we break this impasse with the help of asteroseismic inference and perform a chronology of the evolution of the disk throughout the age of the Galaxy. We chemically dissect the Milky Way disk population using a sample of red giant stars spanning out to 2~kpc in the solar annulus observed by the {\it Kepler} satellite, with the added dimension of asteroseismic ages. Our results reveal a clear difference in age between the low- and high-$\alpha$ populations, which also show distinct velocity dispersions in the $V$ and $W$ components. We find no tight correlation between age and metallicity nor [$\alpha$/Fe] for the high-$\alpha$ disk stars. Our results indicate that this component formed over a period of more than 2~Gyr with a wide range of [M/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe] independent of time. Our findings show that the kinematic properties of young $\alpha$-rich stars are consistent with the rest of the high-$\alpha$ population and different from the low-$\alpha$ stars of similar age, rendering support to their origin being old stars that went through a mass transfer or stellar merger event, making them appear younger, instead of migration of truly young stars formed close to the Galactic bar.
  • Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
  • One of the most difficult properties to derive for stars is their age. For cool main-sequence stars, gyrochronology relations can be used to infer stellar ages from measured rotation pe- riods and HR Diagram positions. These relations have few calibrators with known ages for old, long rotation period stars. There is a significant sample of old Kepler objects of inter- est, or KOIs, which have both measurable surface rotation periods and precise asteroseismic measurements from which ages can be accurately derived. In this work we determine the age and the rotation period of solar-like pulsating KOIs to both compare the rotation properties of stars with and without known planets and enlarge the gyrochronology calibration sample for old stars. We use Kepler photometric light curves to derive the stellar surface rotation peri- ods while ages are obtained with asteroseismology using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal in which individual mode frequencies are combined with high-resolution spectroscopic pa- rameters. We thus determine surface rotation periods and ages for 11 planet-hosting stars, all over 2 Gyr old. We find that the planet-hosting stars exhibit a rotational behaviour that is consistent with the latest age-rotation models and similar to the rotational behaviour of stars without detected planets. We conclude that these old KOIs can be used to test and calibrate gyrochronology along with stars not known to host planets.
  • We perform a quantitative analysis of the solar composition problem by using a statistical approach that allows us to combine the information provided by helioseimic and solar neutrino data in an effective way. We include in our analysis the helioseismic determinations of the surface helium abundance and of the depth of the convective envelope, the measurements of the $^7{\rm Be}$ and $^8{\rm B}$ neutrino fluxes, the sound speed profile inferred from helioseismic frequencies. We provide all the ingredients to describe how these quantities depend on the solar surface composition and to evaluate the (correlated) uncertainties in solar model predictions. We include errors sources that are not traditionally considered such as those from inversion of helioseismic data. We, then, apply the proposed approach to infer the chemical composition of the Sun. We show that the opacity profile of the Sun is well constrained by the solar observational properties. In the context of a two parameter analysis in which elements are grouped as volatiles (i.e. C, N, O and Ne) and refractories (i.e Mg, Si, S, Fe), the optimal composition is found by increasing the the abundance of volatiles by $\left( 45\pm 4\right)\%$ and that of refractories by $\left( 19\pm 3\right)\%$ with respect to the values provided by AGSS09. This corresponds to the abundances $\varepsilon_{\rm O}=8.85\pm 0.01$ and $\varepsilon_{\rm Fe}=7.52\pm0.01$. As an additional result of our analysis, we show that the observational data prefer values for the input parameters of the standard solar models (radiative opacities, gravitational settling rate, the astrophysical factors $S_{34}$ and $S_{17}$) that differ at the $\sim 1\sigma$ level from those presently adopted.
  • The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the inertia and damping of the modes. We have been able to characterize 37 oscillations modes, in particular, a few dipole modes above nu_max that exhibit nearly normal amplitudes. We have inferred a surface rotation period of around 91 days and uncovered the existence of a variation in the surface magnetic activity during the last 4 years. As expected, the internal regions of the star probed by the l = 2 and 3 modes spin 4 to 8 times faster than the surface. With our grid of standard models we are able to properly fit the observed frequencies. Our model calculation of mode inertia and damping give no explanation for the depressed dipole modes. A fast rotating core is also ruled out as a possible explanation. Finally, we do not have any observational evidence of the presence of a strong deep magnetic field inside the star.
  • We combine ground and space-based photometry of the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc to measure four independent lines of evidence for a helium gradient in the cluster, whereby stars in the cluster outskirts would have a lower initial helium abundance than stars in and near the cluster core. First and second, we show that the red giant branch bump (RGBB) stars exhibit gradients in their number counts and brightness. With increased separation from the cluster center, they become more numerous relative to the other red giant (RG) stars. They also become fainter. For our third and fourth lines of evidence, we show that the horizontal branch (HB) of the cluster becomes both fainter and redder for sightlines farther from the cluster center. These four results are respectively detected at the 2.3$\sigma$, 3.6$\sigma$, 7.7$\sigma$ and 4.1$\sigma$ levels. Each of these independent lines of evidence is found to be significant in the cluster-outskirts; closer in, the data are more compatible with uniform mixing. Our radial profile is qualitatively consistent with but quantitatively tighter than previous results based on CN absorption. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a scenario wherein a second generation of stars with modestly enhanced helium and CNO abundance formed deep within the gravitational potential of a cluster of previous generation stars having more canonical abundances.
  • We measure the red giant branch bump (RGBB) of the Galactic bulge, the most metal-rich RGBB ever detected. The RGBB luminosity functions peaks at the expected brightness, but its number density is very low relative to Galactic globular cluster calibrations, implying the Galactic bulge has a higher helium enrichment parameter {\Delta}Y/{\Delta}Z $\ge$ 4.0 for Y~0.35 rather than the standard 2.0 with Y=0.27. The RGBB is (0.71 +/- 0.02) mag fainter than the red clump (RC) in I toward the densest stellar regions imaged by the OGLE-III Galactic bulge photometric survey, (|l| $\le$ 4, 2 <~ |b| $\le$ 4). The number density of RGBB stars is (12.7 +/- 2.0)% that of RC stars. The brightness dispersion of the RGBB is significantly lower than that of the RC, a result that is difficult to explain as the luminosity of the RGBB is known to significantly vary with metallicity. Sightlines toward the Galactic bulge that have two RCs have two RGBBs with similar properties to one another, an expected outcome if the Milky Way's bulge is X-shaped. We also find preliminary evidence of the Galactic bulge asymptotic giant branch bump, at a brightness of ~1.1 mag brighter than the RC in I and with a number density ~1.5% that of the RC. Accounting for the RGBB has a small effect on the best-fit parameters of the RC, shifting its best-fit peak brightness and reducing its brightness dispersion by ~0.015 mag each.
  • We have derived Fe abundances of 16 solar-type Pleiades dwarfs by means of an equivalent width analysis of Fe I and Fe II lines in high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hobby - Eberly Telescope and High Resolution Spectrograph. Abundances derived from Fe II lines are larger than those derived from Fe I lines (herein referred to as over-ionization) for stars with Teff < 5400 K, and the discrepancy (deltaFe = [Fe II/H] - [Fe I/H]) increases dramatically with decreasing Teff, reaching over 0.8 dex for the coolest stars of our sample. The Pleiades joins the open clusters M 34, the Hyades, IC 2602, and IC 2391, and the Ursa Major moving group, demonstrating ostensible over-ionization trends. The Pleiades deltaFe abundances are correlated with Ca II infrared triplet and Halpha chromospheric emission indicators and relative differences therein. Oxygen abundances of our Pleiades sample derived from the high-excitation O I triplet have been previously shown to increase with decreasing Teff, and a comparison with the deltaFe abundances suggests that the over-excitation (larger abundances derived from high excitation lines relative to low excitation lines) and over-ionization effects that have been observed in cool open cluster and disk field main sequence (MS) dwarfs share a common origin. Star-to-star Fe I abundances have low internal scatter, but the abundances of stars with Teff < 5400 K are systematically higher compared to the warmer stars. The cool star [Fe I/H] abundances cannot be connected directly to over-excitation effects, but similarities with the deltaFe and O I triplet trends suggest the abundances are dubious. Using the [Fe I/H] abundances of five stars with Teff > 5400 K, we derive a mean Pleiades cluster metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.01 +/- 0.02.
  • We utilize high-resolution (R~60,000), high S/N (~100) spectroscopy of 17 cool Pleiades dwarfs to examine the confounding star-to-star scatter in the 6707 Li I line strengths in this young cluster. Our Pleiads, selected for their small projected rotational velocity and modest chromospheric emission, evince substantial scatter in the linestrengths of 6707 Li I feature that is absent in the 7699 K I resonance line. The Li I scatter is not correlated with that in the high-excitation 7774 O I feature, and the magnitude of the former is greater than the latter despite the larger temperature sensitivity of the O I feature. These results suggest that systematic errors in linestrength measurements due to blending, color (or color-based T_eff) errors, or line formation effects related to an overlying chromosphere are not the principal source of Li I scatter in our stars. There do exist analytic spot models that can produce the observed Li scatter without introducing scatter in the K I line strengths or the color-magnitude diagram. However, these models predict factor of >3 differences in abundances derived from the subordinate 6104 and resonance 6707 Li I features; we find no difference in the abundances determined from these two features. These analytic spot models also predict CN line strengths significantly larger than we observe in our spectra. The simplest explanation of the Li, K, CN, and photometric data is that there must be a real abundance component to the Pleiades Li dispersion. We suggest that this real abundance component is the manifestation of relic differences in erstwhile pre-main-sequence Li burning caused by effects of surface activity on stellar structure. We discuss observational predictions of these effects.
  • We present the results of a deep (15 ~< r ~< 23), 20 night survey for transiting planets in the intermediate age open cluster M37 (NGC 2099) using the Megacam wide-field mosaic CCD camera on the 6.5m MMT. We do not detect any transiting planets among the ~1450 observed cluster members. We do, however, identify a ~ 1 R_J candidate planet transiting a ~ 0.8 Msun Galactic field star with a period of 0.77 days. The source is faint (V = 19.85 mag) and has an expected velocity semi-amplitude of K ~ 220 m/s (M/M_J). We conduct Monte Carlo transit injection and recovery simulations to calculate the 95% confidence upper limit on the fraction of cluster members and field stars with planets as a function of planetary radius and orbital period. Assuming a uniform logarithmic distribution in orbital period, we find that < 1.1%, < 2.7% and < 8.3% of cluster members have 1.0 R_J planets within Extremely Hot Jupiter (EHJ, 0.4 < T < 1.0 day), Very Hot Jupiter (VHJ, 1.0 < T < 3.0 days) and Hot Jupiter (HJ, 3.0 < T < 5.0 days) period ranges respectively. For 0.5 R_J planets the limits are < 3.2%, and < 21% for EHJ and VHJ period ranges, while for 0.35 R_J planets we can only place an upper limit of < 25% on the EHJ period range. For a sample of 7814 Galactic field stars, consisting primarily of FGKM dwarfs, we place 95% upper limits of < 0.3%, < 0.8% and < 2.7% on the fraction of stars with 1.0 R_J EHJ, VHJ and HJ assuming the candidate planet is not genuine. If the candidate is genuine, the frequency of ~ 1.0 R_J planets in the EHJ period range is 0.002% < f_EHJ < 0.5% with 95% confidence. We place limits of < 1.4%, < 8.8% and < 47% for 0.5 R_J planets, and a limit of < 16% on 0.3 R_J planets in the EHJ period range. This is the first transit survey to place limits on the fraction of stars with planets as small as Neptune.
  • We compare the properties of recent samples of the lithium abundances in halo stars to one another and to the predictions of theoretical models including rotational mixing, and we examine the data for trends with metal abundance. We find from a KS test that in the absence of any correction for chemical evolution, the Ryan, Norris, & Beers (1999} sample is fully consistent with mild rotational mixing induced depletion and, therefore, with an initial lithium abundance higher than the observed value. Tests for outliers depend sensitively on the threshold for defining their presence, but we find a 10$--$45% probability that the RNB sample is drawn from the rotationally mixed models with a 0.2 dex median depletion (with lower probabilities corresponding to higher depletion factors). When chemical evolution trends (Li/H versus Fe/H) are treated in the linear plane we find that the dispersion in the RNB sample is not explained by chemical evolution; the inferred bounds on lithium depletion from rotational mixing are similar to those derived from models without chemical evolution. We find that differences in the equivalent width measurements are primarily responsible for different observational conclusions concerning the lithium dispersion in halo stars. The standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis predicted lithium abundance which corresponds to the deuterium abundance inferred from observations of high-redshift, low-metallicity QSO absorbers requires halo star lithium depletion in an amount consistent with that from our models of rotational mixing, but inconsistent with no depletion.
  • The depletion of lithium during the pre-main sequence and main sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. In the past a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (non-rotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models including rotational mixing have been suggested. Using recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low mass stars, which now permits the construction of theoretical models that reproduce the angular momentum evolution of low mass open cluster stars, along with the observed distribution of initial angular momenta inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters, we study lithium depletion in main sequence halo stars. We predict a well-defined, nearly flat (in T_eff) halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. We also examine the relative depletions of 6Li and 7Li finding that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion. Using observational data to bound the 7Li depletion in main sequence halo stars, we find a maximum depletion of 0.4 dex is set by the observed dispersion and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio, and a minimum depletion of 0.2 dex is required by both the presence of highly overdepleted halo stars and consistency with the solar and open cluster 7Li data. The cosmological implications of these bounds on the primordial abundance of 7Li are discussed. (Abridged)
  • There has been recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low mass stars (Krishnamurthi et al 1997a). Theoretical models can now be constructed which reproduce the angular momentum evolution of low mass open cluster stars and the distribution of initial conditions can be inferred from young clusters. In this poster we report on the application of these models to the problem of rotational mixing in halo stars. The distribution of initial conditions inferred from young clusters produces a well-defined halo lithium "plateau" with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. Different choices for the solar calibration produce a range of absolute depletion factors. We show that both the dispersion and the ratio of $^6$Li depletion to $^7$Li depletion increase as the absolute $^7$Li depletion increases. The measured $^6$Li in HD 84937 and the dispersion in the plateau set independent upper bounds on the $^7$Li depletion. Consistency with open clusters and the Sun, along with claims of an intrinsic dispersion in the plateau, set a lower bound. We derive a range of 0.2-0.4 dex $^7$Li depletion in halo field stars. Implications for cosmology are discussed.
  • The Yale stellar evolution code has been modified to include the combined effects of diffusion and rotational mixing on $^1$H, $^4$He and the trace elements $^3$He, $^6$Li, $^7$Li, and $^9$Be. The interaction between rotational mixing and diffusion is studied by calculating a number of calibrated solar models. The rotational mixing inhibits the diffusion in the outer parts of the models, leading to a decrease in the envelope diffusion by 25 -- 50\%. Conversely, diffusion leads to gradients in mean molecular weight which can inhibit the rotational mixing. The degree to which gradients in mean molecular weight inhibits the rotational mixing is somewhat uncertain. A comparison to the observed solar oblateness suggests that gradients in the mean molecular weight play a smaller role in inhibiting the rotational mixing previously believed. This is reinforced by the fact that the model with the standard value for the inhibiting effect of mean molecular weight on the rotational mixing depletes no Li on the main sequence. This is in clear contrast to the observations. A reduction in the inhibiting effect of mean molecular weight gradients by a factor of ten leads to noticeable main sequence Li depletion.
  • Stellar models with masses ranging from 0.5 to $1.3~M_\odot$ were constructed in order to compare to young cluster observations of Li and of rotation velocities. The amount of Li depletion in cool stars is sensitive to the amount of overshoot at the base of the surface convection zone, and the exact metallicity of the models. Even when this uncertainty is taken into account, the Li observations are a severe constraint for the models and rule out standard models, and pure diffusion models. Stellar models which include diffusion and rotational mixing in the radiative regions of stars are able to simultaneously match the Li abundances observed in the Pleiades, UMaG, Hyades, Praesepe, NGC 752 and M67. They also match the observed rotation periods in the Hyades. However, these models are unable to simultaneously explain the presence of the rapidly rotating late G and K stars in the Pleiades and the absence of rapidly rotating late F and early G stars.