• We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 mag deeper (r<20.6) than the GAMA main survey. There are 25814 galaxy redshifts for H-ATLAS sources from the GAMA main or filler surveys. GAMA DR3 is available at the survey website (www.gama-survey.org/dr3/).
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its autoz automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km/s, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter "Ef" classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g., strong gravitational lens surveys.
  • The ultraviolet-to-radio continuum spectral energy distributions are presented for all 75 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). A principal component analysis of the sample shows that most of the sample's spectral variations stem from two underlying components, one representative of a galaxy with a low infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and one representative of a galaxy with a high infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio. The influence of several parameters on the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio is studied (e.g., optical morphology, disk inclination, far-infrared color, ultraviolet spectral slope, and star formation history). Consistent with our understanding of normal star-forming galaxies, the SINGS sample of galaxies in comparison to more actively star-forming galaxies exhibits a larger dispersion in the infrared-to-ultraviolet versus ultraviolet spectral slope correlation. Early type galaxies, exhibiting low star formation rates and high optical surface brightnesses, have the most discrepant infrared-to-ultraviolet correlation. These results suggest that the star formation history may be the dominant regulator of the broadband spectral variations between galaxies. Finally, a new discovery shows that the 24 micron morphology can be a useful tool for parametrizing the global dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction in nearby galaxies. The dust emission in dwarf/irregular galaxies is clumpy and warm accompanied by low ultraviolet extinction, while in spiral galaxies there is typically a much larger diffuse component of cooler dust and average ultraviolet extinction. For galaxies with nuclear 24 micron emission, the dust temperature and ultraviolet extinction are relatively high compared to disk galaxies.
  • We derive observed Halpha and R band luminosity densities of an HI-selected sample of nearby galaxies using the SINGG sample to be l_Halpha' = (9.4 +/- 1.8)e38 h_70 erg s^-1 Mpc^-3 for Halpha and l_R' = (4.4 +/- 0.7)e37 h_70 erg s^-1 A^-1 Mpc^-3 in the R band. This R band luminosity density is approximately 70% of that found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This leads to a local star formation rate density of log(SFRD) = -1.80 +0.13/-0.07(random) +/- 0.03(systematic) + log(h_70) after applying a mean internal extinction correction of 0.82 magnitudes. The gas cycling time of this sample is found to be t_gas = 7.5 +1.3/-2.1 Gyr, and the volume-averaged equivalent width of the SINGG galaxies is EW(Halpha) = 28.8 +7.2/-4.7 A (21.2 +4.2/-3.5 A without internal dust correction). As with similar surveys, these results imply that SFRD(z) decreases drastically from z ~ 1.5 to the present. A comparison of the dynamical masses of the SINGG galaxies evaluated at their optical limits with their stellar and HI masses shows significant evidence of downsizing: the most massive galaxies have a larger fraction of their mass locked up in stars compared with HI, while the opposite is true for less massive galaxies. We show that the application of the Kennicutt star formation law to a galaxy having the median orbital time at the optical limit of this sample results in a star formation rate decay with cosmic time similar to that given by the SFRD(z) evolution. This implies that the SFRD(z) evolution is primarily due to the secular evolution of galaxies, rather than interactions or mergers. This is consistent with the morphologies predominantly seen in the SINGG sample.
  • (Abridged) We present an initial look at the far infrared-radio correlation within the star-forming disks of four nearby, nearly face-on galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 6946). Using Spitzer MIPS imaging and WSRT radio continuum data, observed as part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), we are able to probe variations in the logarithmic 24mu/22cm (q_24) and 70mu/22cm (q_70) surface brightness ratios across each disk at sub-kpc scales. We find general trends of decreasing q_24 and q_70 with declining surface brightness and with increasing radius. The residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus surface brightness is smaller than the residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus radius, on average by ~0.1 dex, indicating that the distribution of star formation sites is more important in determining the infrared/radio disk appearance than the exponential profiles of disks. We have also performed preliminary phenomenological modeling of cosmic ray electron (CRe^-) diffusion using an image-smearing technique, and find that smoothing the infrared maps improves their correlation with the radio maps. Exponential kernels tend to work better than Gaussian kernels which suggests that additional processes besides simple random-walk diffusion in three dimensions must affect the evolution of CRe^-s. The best fit smoothing kernels for the two less active star-forming galaxies (NGC 2403 and NGC 3031) have much larger scale-lengths than those of the more active star-forming galaxies (NGC 5194 and NGC 6946). This difference may be due to the relative deficit of recent CRe^- injection into the interstellar medium (ISM) for the galaxies having largely quiescent disks.
  • The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multi-wavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850um spectral energy distributions are presented using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally-integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed based on global data for normal star-forming galaxies, though significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared spectral energy distributions for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC3031 (M81), NGC5194 (M51), and NGC7331. Strong correlations exist between the local star formation rate and the infrared colors f_nu(70um)/f_nu(160um) and f_nu(24um)/f_nu(160um), suggesting that the 24 and 70um emission are useful tracers of the local star formation activity level. Preliminary evidence indicates that variations in the 24um emission, and not variations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8um, drive the variations in the f_nu(8.0um)/f_nu(24um) colors within NGC3031, NGC5194, and NGC7331. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in spectral energy distributions seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24um flux will be uncertain at the factor-of-five level (total range). The corresponding uncertainties using the redshifted 8.0um flux (e.g. observed 24um flux for a z=2 source) are factors of 10-20. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities.
  • (Abridged) Far ultraviolet to far infrared images of the nearby galaxy NGC5194, from Spitzer, GALEX, Hubble Space Telescope and ground--based data, are used to investigate local and global star formation, and the impact of dust extinction in HII-emitting knots. In the IR/UV-UV color plane, the NGC5194 HII knots show the same trend observed for normal star-forming galaxies, having a much larger dispersion than starburst galaxies. We identify the dispersion as due to the UV emission predominantly tracing the evolved, non-ionizing stellar population, up to ages 50-100 Myr. While in starbursts the UV light traces the current SFR, in NGC5194 it traces a combination of current and recent-past SFR. Unlike the UV emission, the monochromatic 24 micron luminosity is an accurate local SFR tracer for the HII knots in NGC5194; this suggests that the 24 micron emission carriers are mainly heated by the young, ionizing stars. However, preliminary results show that the ratio of the 24 micron emission to the SFR varies by a factor of a few from galaxy to galaxy. While also correlated with star formation, the 8 micron emission is not directly proportional to the number of ionizing photons. This confirms earlier suggestions that the carriers of the 8 micron emission are heated by more than one mechanism.
  • The nearby spiral galaxy NGC 7331 was spectrally mapped from 5-38um using all modules of Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. A strong new dust emission feature, presumed due to PAHs, was discovered at 17.1um. The feature's intensity is nearly half that of the ubiquitous 11.3um band. The 7-14um spectral maps revealed significant variation in the 7.7 and 11.3um PAH features between the stellar ring and nucleus. Weak [OIV] 25.9um line emission was found to be centrally concentrated in the nucleus, with an observed strength over 10% of the combined neon line flux, indicating an AGN or unusually active massive star photo-ionization. Two [SIII] lines fix the characteristic electron density in the HII regions at n_e < ~200 cm^-3. Three detected H_2 rotational lines, tracing warm molecular gas, together with the observed IR continuum, are difficult to match with standard PDR models. Either additional PDR heating or shocks are required to simultaneously match lines and continuum.