• Luminous radio sources are thought to lie in galaxy clusters or proto-clusters. The complete sample of 64 high-redshift 3C sources at $1<z<2.5$ has been mapped with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRAC $3.6\mu$m and $4.5\mu$m 5-$\sigma$ detection limit of $4\mu$Jy (22.4 AB mag) allows us to search for the brightest candidate cluster member galaxies associated with the 3C sources. To remove the contamination of foreground stars and galaxies along the lines of sight toward the 3C sources we apply color cuts: removed sources satisfy either the IRAC1/2 cut $[3.6] - [4.5] < -0.3$ or the Pan-STARRS/IRAC cut $i - [4.5] < 0.5$ if detected by Pan-STARRS. For both selection methods, about half of the 3C radio sources show significant overdensities ($>3\sigma$) within 30" ($\sim$250 kpc) projected distance from the radio source compared to the surrounding galaxy densities measured in the $50''-120''$ annulus. The Pan-STARRS/IRAC cut reveals higher average overdensities than the IRAC1/2 cut and also a decline of overdensities at $z>1.4$. To infer the nature of the cluster members, we rerun the analysis using a stronger IRAC1/2 cut $[3.6] - [4.5] < -0.1$ which removes $1<z<1.4$ passive ellipticals but not star-forming galaxies. For the strong cut, the overdensities, on average, completely disappear at $1<z<1.4$. We therefore suggest that the 4.5$\mu$m detected cluster member galaxies are mainly passive ellipticals.
  • The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • We report the orbital distribution of the Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the High Ecliptic Latitude (HiLat) extension of the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), conducted from June 2006 to July 2009. The HiLat component was designed to address one of the shortcomings of ecliptic surveys (like CFEPS), their lack of sensitivity to high-inclination objects. We searched 701~deg$^2$ of sky ranging from 12$^\circ$ to 85$^\circ$ ecliptic latitude and discovered \lKBO TNOs, with inclinations between 15$^\circ$ to 104$^\circ$. This survey places a very strong constraint on the inclination distribution of the hot component of the classical Kuiper Belt, ruling out any possibility of a large intrinsic fraction of highly inclined orbits. Using the parameterization of \citet{2001AJ....121.2804B}, the HiLat sample combined with CFEPS imposes a width $14^\circ \le \sigma \le 15.5^\circ$, with a best match for $\sigma = 14.5^\circ$. HiLat discovered the first retrograde TNO, 2008~KV$_{42}$, with an almost polar orbit with inclination 104$^\circ$, and (418993), a scattering object with perihelion in the region of Saturn's influence, with $a \sim 400$~AU and $i = 68^\circ$.
  • [abridged] We quantify the evolution of the stellar mass functions of star-forming and quiescent galaxies as a function of morphology from $z\sim 3$ to the present. Our sample consists of ~50,000 galaxies in the CANDELS fields ($\sim880$ $arcmin^2$), which we divide into four main morphological types, i.e. pure bulge dominated systems, pure spiral disk dominated, intermediate 2-component bulge+disk systems and irregular disturbed galaxies. Our main results are: Star-formation: At $z\sim 2$, 80\% of the stellar mass density of star-forming galaxies is in irregular systems. However, by $z\sim 0.5$, irregular objects only dominate at stellar masses below $10^9M\odot$. A majority of the star-forming irregulars present at $z\sim 2$ undergo a gradual transformation from disturbed to normal spiral disk morphologies by $z\sim 1$ without significant interruption to their star-formation. Rejuvenation after a quenching event does not seem to be common except perhaps for the most massive objects. Quenching: We confirm that galaxies reaching a stellar mass of $M_*\sim10^{10.8}M_\odot$ ($M^*$) tend to quench. Also, quenching implies the presence of a bulge: the abundance of massive red disks is negligible at all redshifts over 2~dex in stellar mass. However the dominant quenching mechanism evolves. At $z>2$, the SMF of quiescent galaxies above $M^*$ is dominated by compact spheroids. Quenching at this early epoch destroys the disk and produces a compact remnant unless the star-forming progenitors at even higher redshifts are significantly more dense. At $1<z<2$, the majority of newly quenched galaxies are disks with a significant central bulge. This suggests that mass-quenching at this epoch starts from the inner parts and preserves the disk. At $z<1$, the high mass end of the passive SMF is globally in place and the evolution mostly happens at stellar masses below $10^{10}M_\odot$.
  • To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\leq z \leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\it HST}, {\it Spitzer}, {\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses, IR luminosities, and star formation rates (SFRs). The SED fits of six SPT sources show that the intrinsic stellar masses span a range more than one order of magnitude with a median value $\sim$ 5 $\times 10^{10}M_{\Sun}$. The intrinsic IR luminosities range from 4$\times 10^{12}L_{\Sun}$ to 4$\times 10^{13}L_{\Sun}$. They all have prodigious intrinsic star formation rates of 510 to 4800 $M_{\Sun} {\rm yr}^{-1}$. Compared to the star-forming main sequence (MS), these six DSFGs have specific SFRs that all lie above the MS, including two galaxies that are a factor of 10 higher than the MS. Our results suggest that we are witnessing the ongoing strong starburst events which may be driven by major mergers.
  • The Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Deep Near-Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS; PI G. Fazio) is a Cycle 8 Exploration Program designed to detect galaxies at very high redshifts (z > 5). To mitigate the effects of cosmic variance and also to take advantage of deep coextensive coverage in multiple bands by the Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CANDELS, S-CANDELS was carried out within five widely separated extragalactic fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the HST Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. S-CANDELS builds upon the existing coverage of these fields from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) by increasing the integration time from 12 hours to a total of 50 hours but within a smaller area, 0.16 square degrees. The additional depth significantly increases the survey completeness at faint magnitudes. This paper describes the S-CANDELS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. We present IRAC dual-band 3.6+4.5 micron catalogs reaching to a depth of 26.5 AB mag. Deep IRAC counts for the roughly 135,000 galaxies detected by S-CANDELS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. The increase in depth beyond earlier Spitzer/IRAC surveys does not reveal a significant additional contribution from discrete sources to the diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). Thus it remains true that only roughly half of the estimated CIB flux from COBE/DIRBE is resolved.
  • We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at $z > 1.3$ selected from the 94 deg$^{2}$ Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates in SSDF adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Bo\"otes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three $1.4 < z \leq 1.75$ X-ray detected clusters in the Bo\"otes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE and XMM-Newton. This rich dataset will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density $n_c = (0.7^{+6.3}_{-0.6}) \times 10^{-7} h^{3} \mathrm{Mpc}^{-3}$ and a spatial clustering correlation scale length $r_0 = (32 \pm 7) h^{-1} \rm{Mpc}$. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, $M_{{\rm min}}$, we derive that at $z=1.5$ these clusters reside in halos larger than $M_{{\rm min}} = 1.5^{+0.9}_{-0.7} \times 10^{14} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$. (abridged)
  • Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (1<z<2), low-frequency selected (and so unbiased in orientation) 3CRR radio sources are reported. The sample includes 21 quasars (= broad line radio galaxies) and 17 narrow line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with matched 178 MHz radio luminosity (log L_R ~ 44-45). The quasars have high radio core-fraction, high X-ray luminosities (log L_X ~ 45-46) and soft X-ray hardness ratios (HR ~ -0.5) indicating low obscuration. The NLRGs have lower core-fraction, lower apparent X-ray luminosities (log L_X ~ 43-45) and mostly hard X-ray hardness ratios (HR>0) indicating obscuration (log N_H ~ 22-24 cm^-2). These properties and the correlation between obscuration and radio core-fraction are consistent with orientation-dependent obscuration as in Unification models. About half the NLRGs have soft X-ray hardness ratios and/or high [OIII] emission line to X-ray luminosity ratio suggesting obscuration by Compton thick (CT) material so that scattered nuclear or extended X-ray emission dominates (as in NGC1068). The ratios of unobscured to Compton-thin (10^{22}< N_H(int) < 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^-2) to CT (N_H(int) > 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^-2) is 2.5:1.4:1 in this high luminosity, radio-selected sample. The obscured fraction is 0.5, higher than is typically reported for AGN at comparable luminosities from multi-wavelength surveys (0.1-0.3). Assuming random nuclear orientation, the unobscured half-opening angle of the disk/wind/torus structure is ~ 60deg and the obscuring material covers 30deg of which ~ 12deg is Compton thick. The multi-wavelength properties reveal that many NLRGs have intrinsic absorption 10-1000x higher than indicated by their X-ray hardness ratios, and their true L_X values are ~10--100x larger than the hardness-ratio absorption corrections would indicate.
  • We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to ~ 1 deg using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields, with depths of ~12 hr/pixel over 3 epochs, are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 mic. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of AB mag ~ 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier-transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 mic power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to > 10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to < 1 deg. The low shot noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model (LCDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.
  • The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10 meter telescope operating at mm wavelengths. It has recently completed a three-band survey covering 2500 sq. degrees. One of the survey's main goals is to detect galaxy clusters using Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and use these clusters for a variety of cosmological and astrophysical studies such as the dark energy equation of state, the primordial non-gaussianity and the evolution of galaxy populations. Since 2005, we have been engaged in a comprehensive optical and near-infrared followup program (at wavelengths between 0.4 and 5 {\mu}m) to image high-significance SPT clusters, to measure their photometric redshifts, and to estimate the contamination rate of the candidate lists. These clusters are then used for various cosmological and astrophysical studies.
  • Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z =1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, Gamma = 1.66 +/- 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally-detected Fe Kalpha emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about half of which is associated with the radio emission from this source. The southern emission is co-spatial with the radio lobe and peaks at the position of the double radio hotspot. Modeling this hotspot including Spitzer upper limits rules out synchrotron emission from a single power-law population of electrons, favoring inverse-Compton emission with a field of ~11nT, roughly a third of the equipartition value. The northern emission is concentrated close to the location of a 40 deg. bend where the radio jet is presumed to encounter external material. It can be explained by inverse Compton emission involving Cosmic Microwave Background photons with a field of ~3nT, roughly a factor of nine below the equipartition value. The remaining, more diffuse X-ray emission is harder (HR=-0.09 +/- 0.22). With only 22.8+/-5.6 counts, the spectral form cannot be constrained. Assuming thermal emission with a temperature of 4 keV yields an estimate for the luminosity of 1.8E44 erg/s, consistent with the luminosity-temperature relation of lower-redshift clusters. However deeper Chandra X-ray observations are required to delineate the spatial distribution, and better constrain the spectrum of the diffuse emission to verify that we have detected X-ray emission from a high-redshift cluster.
  • We present the J-band luminosity function of 1838 mid-infrared and X-ray selected AGNs in the redshift range 0<z<5.85. These luminosity functions are constructed by combining the deep multi-wavelength broad-band observations from the UV to the mid-IR of the NDWFS Bootes field with the X-ray observations of the XBootes survey and the spectroscopic observations of the same field by AGES. Our sample is primarily composed of IRAC-selected AGNs, targeted using modifications of the Stern et al.(2005) criteria, complemented by MIPS 24 microns and X-ray selected AGNs to alleviate the biases of IRAC mid-IR selection against z~4.5 quasars and AGNs faint with respect to their hosts. This sample provides an accurate link between low and high redshift AGN luminosity functions and does not suffer from the usual incompleteness of optical samples at z~3. We find that the space density of the brightest quasars strongly decreases from z=3 to z=0, while the space density of faint quasars is at least flat, and possibly increasing, over the same redshift range. At z>3 we observe a decrease in the space density of quasars of all brightnesses. We model the luminosity function by a double power-law and find that its evolution cannot be described by either pure luminosity or pure density evolution, but must be a combination of both. Our best-fit model has bright and faint power-law indices consistent with the low redshift measurements based on the 2QZ and 2SLAQ surveys and it generally agrees with the number of bright quasars predicted by other LFs at all redshifts. If we construct the QSO luminosity function using only the IRAC-selected AGNs, we find that the biases inherent to this selection method significantly modify the behavior of phi*(z) only for z<1 and have no significant impact upon the characteristic magnitude M*_J(z).
  • Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained rest frame 9-16mu spectra of 11 quasars and 9 radio galaxies from the 3CRR catalog at redshifts 1.0<z<1.4. This complete flux-limited 178MHz-selected sample is unbiased with respect to orientation and therefore suited to study orientation-dependent effects in the most powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). The mean radio galaxy spectrum shows a clear silicate absorption feature (tau_9.7mu = 1.1) whereas the mean quasar spectrum shows silicates in emission. The mean radio galaxy spectrum matches a dust-absorbed mean quasar spectrum in both shape and overall flux level. The data for individual objects conform to these results. The trend of the silicate depth to increase with decreasing core fraction of the radio source further supports that for this sample, orientation is the main driver for the difference between radio galaxies and quasars, as predicted by AGN unification. However, comparing our high-z sample with lower redshift 3CRR objects reveals that the absorption of the high-z radio galaxy MIR continuum is lower than expected from a scaled up version of lower luminosity sources, and we discuss some effects that may explain these trends.
  • Differential K-band luminosity functions (LFs) are presented for a complete sample of 1613 nearby bright galaxies segregated by visible morphology. The LF for late-type spirals follows a power law that rises towards low luminosities whereas the LFs for ellipticals, lenticulars and bulge-dominated spirals are peaked and decline toward both higher and lower luminosities. Each morphological type (E, S0, S0/a-Sab, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd) contributes approximately equally to the overall K-band luminosity density of galaxies in the local universe. Type averaged bulge/disk ratios are used to subtract the disk component leading to the prediction that the K-band LF for bulges is bimodal with ellipticals dominating the high luminosity peak, comprising 60% of the bulge luminosity density in the local universe with the remaining 40% contributed by lenticulars and the bulges of spirals. Overall, bulges contribute 30% of the galaxy luminosity density at K in the local universe with spiral disks making up the remainder. If bulge luminosities indicate central black hole masses, then our results predict that the black hole mass function is also bimodal.
  • Differential 2.2um (K-band) luminosity functions are presented for a complete sample of 1570 nearby Vgsr < 3000 km/s, where Vgsr is the velocity measured with respect to the Galactic standard of rest), bright (K < 10 mag), galaxies segregated by visible morphology. The K-band luminosity function for late-type spirals follows a power law that rises towards low luminosities whereas the K-band luminosity functions for ellipticals, lenticulars and bulge-dominated spirals are peaked with a fall off at both high and low luminosities. However, each morphological type (E, S0, S0/a-Sab, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd) contributes approximately equally to the overall K-band luminosity density in the local universe, and by inference, the stellar mass density as well.
  • We combine Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared (MIR) and Chandra X-ray observations of the dominant galaxies NGC6872 and NGC6876 in the Pavo group with archival optical and HI data to study interaction-induced star formation. In spiral galaxy NGC6872, 8.0 and 5.8 micron nonstellar emission having colors consistent with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is concentrated in clumps in three regions: in a 5 kpc radius outer ring about the center of the spiral galaxy, in a bridge of emission connecting NGC6872's northern spiral arm to IC4970, and along the full extent of NGC6872's tidal arms. PAH emission is correlated with young star clusters and dense HI regions. We find no strong differences in the MIR colors of star-forming regions in the spiral galaxy NGC6872 as a function of position relative to the tidally interacting companion galaxy IC4970. We find 11 very luminous X-ray sources (>~ (0.5 - 5) x 10^{39} ergs/s) clustered to the southwest in NGC6872, near bright star-forming regions. In NGC6872's tidal features, young star clusters form at the boundaries of diffuse X-ray gas, suggesting that stars form as gas stripped by the interactions cools. The nucleus of NGC6872 is a weak X-ray point source (0.5-8 keV luminosity of 8.5 x 10^{39} ergs/s), but there is little evidence in the inner 1 kpc of NGC6872 for PAH emission from recent star formation or nuclear activity. However, a 4 kpc `stream', leading from the outer ring of NGC6872 to the nucleus, may signal transport of interstellar matter into NGC6872's nuclear region. Nonstellar emission, consistent with PAH emission, is also found in the central region of elliptical galaxy NGC6877, companion to dominant Pavo group elliptical NGC6876. However, in the central region of NGC6876, the dust emission is more likely due to silicate emission from old AGB stars.
  • High-resolution submm imaging of the HzRG, 4C60.07, at z=3.8, has revealed two dusty components. Spitzer imaging shows that one of these components (B) is coincident with an extremely red AGN, offset by ~4" (~30 kpc) from the HzRG core. The other submm component (A) - resolved by our beam and devoid of emission at 3.6-8.0um - lies between B and the HzRG core. Since the HzRG was discovered via its young, steep-spectrum lobes and their creation was likely triggered by the interaction, we argue that we are witnessing an early-stage merger, prior to its eventual equilibrium state. The interaction is between the host galaxy of an actively-fueled BH, and a gas-rich starburst/AGN (B) marked by the compact submm component and coincident with broad CO emission. `A' is a plume of cold, dusty gas, associated with a narrow (~150 km/s) CO feature, and may represent a short-lived tidal structure. It has been claimed that HzRGs and SMGs differ only in the activity of their AGNs, but such complex submm morphologies are seen only rarely amongst SMGs. Our study has important implications: where a galaxy's gas is not aligned with its central BH, CO may be an unreliable probe of dynamical mass, affecting work on the co-assembly of BHs and spheroids. Our data support the picture wherein close binary AGN are induced by mergers. They also raise the possibility that some supposedly jet-induced starbursts may have formed co-evally with (yet independently of) the radio jets, both triggered by the same interaction. We note that the HzRG host would have gone unnoticed without its jets/companion, so there may be many other unseen BHs at high redshift, lost in the sea of ~5 x 10^8 similarly bright IRAC sources - sufficiently massive to drive a >10^27-W radio source, yet practically invisible unless actively fueled (abridged).
  • Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained 3.6--24 micron photometry of 38 radio galaxies and 24 quasars from the 3CR catalog at redshift 1<z<2.5. This 178 MHz-selected sample is unbiased with respect to orientation and therefore suited to study orientation-dependent effects in the most powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). Quasar and radio galaxy subsamples matched in isotropic radio luminosity are compared. The quasars all have similar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), nearly constant in nu F_nu through the rest 1.6-10 micron range, consistent with a centrally heated dust distribution which outshines the host galaxy contribution. The radio galaxy SEDs show larger dispersion, but the mean radio galaxy SED declines from rest 1.6 to 3 micron and then rises from 3 to 8 micron. The radio galaxies are on average a factor 3-10 less luminous in this spectral range than the quasars. These characteristics are consistent with composite emission from a heavily reddened AGN plus starlight from the host galaxy. The mid-infrared colors and radio to mid-infrared spectral slopes of individual galaxies are also consistent with this picture. Individual galaxies show different amounts of extinction and host galaxy starlight, consistent with the orientation-dependent unified scheme.
  • Using three newly identified galaxy clusters at z~1 (photometric redshift) we measure the evolution of the galaxies within clusters from high redshift to the present day by studying the growth of the red cluster sequence. The clusters are located in the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Dark Field, an extremely deep mid-infrared survey near the north ecliptic pole with photometry in 18 total bands from X-ray through far-IR. Two of the candidate clusters are additionally detected as extended emission in matching Chandra data in the survey area allowing us to measure their masses to be M_{500}= 6.2 \pm 1.0 \times 10^{13} and 3.6 \pm 1.1 \times 10^{13} solar masses. For all three clusters we create a composite color magnitude diagram in rest-frame B-K using our deep HST and Spitzer imaging. By comparing the fraction of low luminosity member galaxies on the composite red sequence with the corresponding population in local clusters at z=0.1 taken from the COSMOS survey, we examine the effect of a galaxy's mass on its evolution. We find a deficit of faint galaxies on the red sequence in our z~1 clusters which implies that more massive galaxies have evolved in clusters faster than less massive galaxies, and that the less massive galaxies are still forming stars in clusters such that they have not yet settled onto the red sequence.
  • We explore the stellar population of M31 in a Spitzer Space Telescope survey utilizing IRAC and MIPS observations. Red supergiants are the brightest objects seen in the infrared; they are a prominent evolutionary phase. Due to their circumstellar envelopes, many of these radiate the bulk of their luminosity at IRAC wavelengths and do not stand out in the near infrared or optically. Going fainter, we see large numbers of luminous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, many of which are known long period variables. Relative to M33, the AGB carbon star population of M31 appears sparse, but this needs to be spectroscopically confirmed.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • We present photometric analysis of deep mid-infrared observations obtained by Spitzer/IRAC covering the fields Q1422+2309, Q2233+1341, DSF2237a,b, HDFN, SSA22a,b and B20902+34, giving the number counts and the depths for each field. In a sample of 751 LBGs lying in those fields, 443, 448, 137 and 152 are identified at 3.6microns, 4.5microns, 5.8microns, 8.0microns IRAC bands respectively, expanding their spectral energy distribution to rest-near-infrared and revealing that LBGs display a variety of colours. Their rest-near-infrared properties are rather inhomogeneous, ranging from those that are bright in IRAC bands and exhibit [R]-[3.6] > 1.5 colours to those that are faint or not detected at all in IRAC bands with [R]-[3.6] < 1.5 colours and these two groups of LBGs are investigated. We compare the mid-IR colours of the LBGs with the colours of star-forming galaxies and we find that LBGs have colours consistent with star-foming galaxies at z~3. The properties of the LBGs detected in the 8microns IRAC band (rest frame K-band) are examined separately, showing that they exhibit redder [R]-[3.6] colours than the rest of the population and that IRAC 8microns band can be used as a diagnostic tool, to separate AGN dominated objects from normal star-forming galaxies at z~3
  • We present results from Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared observations of the interacting galaxy pair NGC6872/IC4970 in the Pavo galaxy group and show that the smaller companion galaxy IC4970 hosts a highly obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity of the nucleus is variable, increasing by a factor 2.9 to 1.7 x 10^{42} erg/s (bright state) on ~100 ks timescales. The X-ray spectrum of the is heavily absorbed (N_H = 3 x 10^{23} cm^{-2}) for power law models with Gamma = 1.5-2.0 and shows a clear 6.4 keV Fe Kalpha line with equivalent width of 144-195 eV. Limits on the diffuse emission in IC4970 from Chandra X-ray data suggest that the available power from Bondi accretion of hot interstellar gas may be an order of magnitude too small to power the AGN. Spitzer images show that 8 micron nonstellar emission is concentrated in the central 1 kpc of IC4970, consistent with high obscuration in this region. The mid-infrared colors of the nucleus are consistent with those expected for a highly obscured AGN. Taken together these data suggest that the nucleus of IC4970 is a Seyfert 2, triggered and fueled by cold material supplied to the central supermassive black hole as a result of the off-axis collision of IC4970 with the cold-gas rich spiral galaxy NGC6872.
  • Mid-infrared observations of the Andromeda galaxy, M31, obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, are presented. The image mosaics cover areas of approximate 3.7deg x 1.6deg and include the satellite galaxies M32 and NGC 205. The appearance of M31 varies dramatically in the different mid-infrared bands, from the smooth bulge and disk of the old stellar population seen at 3.6um to the well-known '10 kpc ring' dominating the 8um image. The similarity of the 3.6um and optical isophotes and nearly constant optical-mid-infrared color over the inner 400 arcsec confirms that there is no significant extinction at optical wavelengths in M31's bulge. The nuclear colors indicate the presence of dust but not an infrared-bright nucleus. The integrated 8um non-stellar luminosity implies a star formation rate of 0.4 Msun/yr, consistent with other indicators that show M31 to be a quiescent galaxy.
  • The unusual morphology of the Andromeda Spiral (Messier 31, the closest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way) has long been an enigma. Although regarded for decades as showing little evidence of a violent history, M~31 has a well-known outer ring of star formation at a radius of 10 kpc whose center is offset from the galaxy nucleus. In addition, the outer galaxy disk is warped as seen at both optical and radio wavelengths. The halo contains numerous loops and ripples. Here we report the discovery, based on analysis of previously-obtained data, of a second, inner dust ring with projected dimensions 1.5 by 1 kpc and offset by ~0.5kpc from the center of the galaxy. The two rings appear to be density waves propagating in the disk. Numerical simulations offer a completely new interpretation for the morphology of M31: both rings result from a companion galaxy plunging head-on through the center of the disk of M31. The most likely interloper is M32. Head-on collisions between galaxies are rare, but it appears nonetheless that one took place 210 million years ago in our Local Group of galaxies.