• We explore constraints on the joint photometric and morphological evolution of typical low redshift galaxies as they move from the blue cloud through the green valley and onto the red sequence. We select GAMA survey galaxies with $10.25<{\rm log}(M_*/M_\odot)<10.75$ and $z<0.2$ classified according to their intrinsic $u^*-r^*$ colour. From single component S\'ersic fits, we find that the stellar mass-sensitive $K-$band profiles of red and green galaxy populations are very similar, while $g-$band profiles indicate more disk-like morphologies for the green galaxies: apparent (optical) morphological differences arise primarily from radial mass-to-light ratio variations. Two-component fits show that most green galaxies have significant bulge and disk components and that the blue to red evolution is driven by colour change in the disk. Together, these strongly suggest that galaxies evolve from blue to red through secular disk fading and that a strong bulge is present prior to any decline in star formation. The relative abundance of the green population implies a typical timescale for traversing the green valley $\sim 1-2$~Gyr and is independent of environment, unlike that of the red and blue populations. While environment likely plays a r\^ole in triggering the passage across the green valley, it appears to have little effect on time taken. These results are consistent with a green valley population dominated by (early type) disk galaxies that are insufficiently supplied with gas to maintain previous levels of disk star formation, eventually attaining passive colours. No single event is needed quench their star formation.
  • We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 mag deeper (r<20.6) than the GAMA main survey. There are 25814 galaxy redshifts for H-ATLAS sources from the GAMA main or filler surveys. GAMA DR3 is available at the survey website (www.gama-survey.org/dr3/).
  • Measurement of the evolution of both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-formation in galaxies underpins our understanding of galaxy evolution over cosmic time. Radio continuum observations can provide key information on these two processes, in particular via the mechanical feedback produced by radio jets in AGN, and via an unbiased dust-independent measurement of star-formation rates. In this paper we determine radio luminosity functions at 325 MHz for a sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies by matching a 138 deg sq. radio survey conducted with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), with optical imaging and redshifts from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We find that the radio luminosity function at 325 MHz for star-forming galaxies closely follows that measured at 1.4 GHz. By fitting the AGN radio luminosity function out to $z = 0.5$ as a double power law, and parametrizing the evolution as ${\Phi} \propto (1 + z)^{k}$ , we find evolution parameters of $k = 0.92 \pm 0.95$ assuming pure density evolution and $k = 2.13 \pm 1.96$ assuming pure luminosity evolution. We find that the Low Excitation Radio Galaxies are the dominant population in space density at lower luminosities. Comparing our 325 MHz observations with radio continuum imaging at 1.4 GHz, we determine separate radio luminosity functions for steep and flat-spectrum AGN, and show that the beamed population of flat-spectrum sources in our sample can be shifted in number density and luminosity to coincide with the unbeamed population of steep-spectrum sources, as is expected in the orientation based unification of AGN.
  • We analyse new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z=1.62 cluster, Cl0218.3-0510, which lies in the UKIDSS/UDS field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities >1e12 Lo and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit Cycle-1 ALMA submillimeter continuum imaging which covers one of these sources to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalised sense) than clusters at z~0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z=1.6, M(H)~-23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present-day which are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies which were already passive at z~1.6 (M(H)~-20.5 and M(H)~-21.5 respectively at z~0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z=1.6 and that in Cl0218.3-0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.
  • We investigate the multi-wavelength properties of a sample of 450-\mu m selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). A total of 69 sources were identified above 4\sigma\ in deep SCUBA-2 450-\mu m observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 sq. arcmin to a typical depth of \sigma 450=1.5 mJy. Reliable cross identification are found for 58 sources (84 per cent) in Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data. The photometric redshift distribution (dN/dz) of 450\mu m-selected sources is presented, showing a broad peak in the redshift range 1<z<3, and a median of z=1.4. Combining the SCUBA-2 photometry with Herschel SPIRE data from HerMES, the submm spectral energy distribution (SED) is examined via the use of modified blackbody fits, yielding aggregate values for the IR luminosity, dust temperature and emissivity of <LIR>=10^12 +/- 0.8 L_sol, <T_D>=42 +/- 11 K and <\beta_D>=1.6 +/- 0.5, respectively. The relationship between these SED parameters and the physical properties of galaxies is investigated, revealing correlations between T_D and LIR and between \beta_D and both stellar mass and effective radius. The connection between star formation rate and stellar mass is explored, with 24 per cent of 450 \mu m sources found to be ``star-bursts'', i.e. displaying anomalously high specific SFRs. However, both the number density and observed properties of these ``star-burst'' galaxies are found consistent with the population of normal star-forming galaxies.
  • (Abridged) Distant galaxy clusters provide important tests of the growth of large scale structure in addition to highlighting the process of galaxy evolution in a consistently defined environment at large look back time. We present a sample of 22 distant (z>0.8) galaxy clusters and cluster candidates selected from the 9 deg2 footprint of the overlapping X-ray Multi Mirror (XMM) Large Scale Structure (LSS), CFHTLS Wide and Spitzer SWIRE surveys. Clusters are selected as extended X-ray sources with an accompanying overdensity of galaxies displaying optical to mid-infrared photometry consistent with z>0.8. Nine clusters have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 0.8<z<1.2, four of which are presented here for the first time. A further 11 candidate clusters have between 8 and 10 band photometric redshifts in the interval 0.8<z<2.2, while the remaining two candidates do not have information in sufficient wavebands to generate a reliable photometric redshift. All of the candidate clusters reported in this paper are presented for the first time. Those confirmed and candidate clusters with available near infrared photometry display evidence for a red sequence galaxy population, determined either individually or via a stacking analysis, whose colour is consistent with the expectation of an old, coeval stellar population observed at the cluster redshift. We further note that the sample displays a large range of red fraction values indicating that the clusters may be at different stages of red sequence assembly. We compare the observed X-ray emission to the flux expected from a suite of model clusters and find that the sample displays an effective mass limit M200 ~ 1e14 Msolar with all clusters displaying masses consistent with M200 < 5e14 Msolar. This XMM distant cluster study represents a complete sample of X-ray selected z>0.8 clusters.
  • Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies are generally thought to be the young counterparts of classical extended radio sources and live in massive ellipticals. GPS sources are vital for studying the early evolution of radio-loud AGN, the trigger of their nuclear activity, and the importance of feedback in galaxy evolution. We study the Parkes half-Jansky sample of GPS radio galaxies of which now all host galaxies have been identified and 80% has their redshifts determined (0.122 < z < 1.539). Analysis of the absolute magnitudes of the GPS host galaxies show that at z > 1 they are on average a magnitude fainter than classical 3C radio galaxies. This suggests that the AGN in young radio galaxies have not yet much influenced the overall properties of the host galaxy. However their restframe UV luminosities indicate that there is a low level of excess as compared to passive evolution models.
  • We present details of the discovery of XLSSJ022303.0-043622, a z=1.2 cluster of galaxies. This cluster was identified from its X-ray properties and selected as a z>1 candidate from its optical/near-IR characteristics in the XMM Large-Scale Structure Survey (XMM-LSS). It is the most distant system discovered in the survey to date. We present ground-based optical and near IR observations of the system carried out as part of the XMM-LSS survey. The cluster has a bolometric X-ray luminosity of 1.1 +/- 0.7 x 10^44 erg/s, fainter than most other known z>1 X-ray selected clusters. In the optical it has a remarkably compact core, with at least a dozen galaxies inside a 125 kpc radius circle centred on the X-ray position. Most of the galaxies within the core, and those spectroscopically confirmed to be cluster members, have stellar masses similar to those of massive cluster galaxies at low redshift. They have colours comparable to those of galaxies in other z>1 clusters, consistent with showing little sign of strong ongoing star formation. The bulk of the star formation within the galaxies appears to have ceased at least 1.5 Gyr before the observed epoch. Our results are consistent with massive cluster galaxies forming at z>1 and passively evolving thereafter. We also show that the system is straightforwardly identified in Spitzer/IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron data obtained by the SWIRE survey emphasising the power and utility of joint XMM and Spitzer searches for the most distant clusters.
  • We report observations of ionized and warm molecular gas in the extended regions of the central galaxies in several cooling flow clusters. These show that both gas phases are present in these clusters to large radii. We trace both Pa alpha and H2 lines to radii in excess of 20 kpc. The surface brightness profiles of the two phases trace each other closely. Apart from very close to the central AGN, line ratios in and between the phases vary only slowly with position. The kinematics of the phases are indistinguishable and away from the influence of the central AGN both the mean and dispersion in velocity are low (<= 100 km/s) ruling out kinematic support of the molecular gas. All of the above indicates that the mechanisms for heating the molecular gas and ionizing the HII regions are highly coupled. The highest surface brightness emission within a few kpc of the central AGN is distinct, both kinematically and thermally from that at larger radii. The relative strengths of the Pa alpha to the H2 lines indicates a source of UV excitation rich in EUV relative to FUV photons, e.g. a black body with a temperature >= 10^5 K.
  • We present a deep H-band image of the field of a candidate z=10 galaxy magnified by the foreground (z=0.25) cluster A1835. The image was obtained with NIRI on Gemini North to better constrain the photometry and investigate the morphology of the source. The image is approximately one magnitude deeper and has better spatial resolution (seeing was 0.4-0.5 arcsec) than the existing H-band image obtained with ISAAC on the VLT by Pello' et al. 2004. The object is not detected in our new data. Given the published photometry (H(AB)=25.0), we would have expected it to have been detected at more than ~7 sigma in a 1.4 arcsec diameter aperture. We obtain a limit of H(AB)>26.0 (3 sigma) for the object. A major part of the evidence that this object is at z=10 was the presence of a strong continuum break between the J and H band, attributed to absorption of all continuum shortward of 1216 Ang in the rest-frame of the object. Our H-band non-detection substantially reduces the magnitude of any break and therefore weakens the case that this object is at z=10. Without a clear continuum break, the identification of an emission line at 1.33745um as Ly-alpha at z~10 is less likely. We show that the width and flux of this line are consistent with an alternative emission line such as [OIII]5007 from an intermediate redshift HII/dwarf galaxy.
  • We present an overview of the occurrence and properties of atomic gas associated with compact radio sources at redshifts up to z=0.85. Searches for HI 21cm absorption were made with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at UHF-high frequencies (725-1200 MHz). Detections were obtained for 19 of the 57 sources with usable spectra (33%). We have found a large range in line depths, from tau=0.16 to tau<=0.001. There is a substantial variety of line profiles, including Gaussians of less than 10km/s, to more typically 150km/s, as well as irregular and multi-peaked absorption profiles, sometimes spanning several hundred km/s. Assuming uniform coverage of the entire radio source, we obtain column depths of atomic gas between 1e19 and 3.3e21(Tsp/100K)(1/f)cm^(-2). There is evidence for significant gas motions, but in contrast to earlier results at low redshift, there are many sources in which the HI velocity is substantially negative (up to v=-1420km/s) with respect to the optical redshift, suggesting that in these sources the atomic gas, rather than falling into the centre, may be be flowing out, interacting with the jets, or rotating around the nucleus.
  • We have determined the central velocity dispersion and surface brightness profiles for a sample of powerful radio galaxies in the redshift range 0.06<z<0.31, which were selected on the basis of their young radio source. The optical hosts follow the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies, showing that young radio sources reside in normal ellipticals, as do other types of radio galaxies. As young radio sources are relatively straightforward to select and the contributions of the AGN light to the optical spectra are minimal, these objects can readily be used to study the evolution of the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies out to z=1, independently of optical selection effects. The black hole masses of the objects in our sample have been determined using the tight empirical relation of M_bh with central velocity dispersion, and for literature samples of classical radio galaxies and optically selected ellipticals. Only the optically selected in-active galaxies are found to exhibit a correlation between M_bh and radio luminosity. In contrast, the radio powers of the AGN in the samples do not correlate with M_bh at all, with objects at a given black hole mass ranging over 7 orders of magnitude in radio power. We have been able to tie in the population of powerful radio sources with its parent population of in-active elliptical galaxies: the local black hole mass function has been determined, which was combined with the fraction of radio-loud black holes as function of M_bh, as determined from the optically selected galaxy sample, to derive the local volume-density of radio galaxies and the distribution of their black hole masses. These are shown to be consistent with the local radio luminosity function and the distribution of black hole masses in the radio selected samples [ABBREVIATED]
  • This paper describes the selection of a new southern/equatorial sample of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies, and subsequent optical CCD imaging and spectroscopic observations using the ESO 3.6m telescope. The sample consists of 49 sources with -40<\delta<+15 degrees, |b|>20 degrees, and S(2.7GHz)>0.5 Jy, selected from the Parkes PKSCAT90 survey. About 80% of the sources are optically identified, and about half of the identifications have available redshifts. The R-band Hubble diagram and evolution of the host galaxies of GPS sources are reviewed.
  • We have taken K-band spectra covering 7 cooling flow clusters. The spectra show many of the 1-0S transitions of molecular Hydrogen, as well as some of the higher vibrational transitions, and some lines of ionized Hydrogen. The line ratios allow us to conclude that the rotational states of the first excited vibrational state are in approximate LTE, so that densities above 10^5/ cm^3 are likely, but there is evidence that the higher vibrational states are not in LTE. The lack of pressure balance between the molecular gas and the ionized components emphasizes the need for dynamic models of the gas. The ratios of the ionized to molecular lines are relatively constant but lower than from starburst regions, indicating that alternative heating mechanisms are necessary.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources drawn from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS). Redshifts have been determined for 19 (40%) of the objects. The optical spectra of the GPS sources identified with low redshift galaxies show deep stellar absorption features. This confirms previous suggestions that their optical light is not significantly contaminated by AGN-related emission, but is dominated by a population of old (>9 Gyr) and metal-rich (>0.2 [Fe/H]) stars, justifying the use of these (probably) young radio sources as probes of galaxy evolution. The optical spectra of GPS sources identified with quasars are indistinguishable from those of flat spectrum quasars, and clearly different from the spectra of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) quasars. The redshift distribution of the GPS quasars in our radio-faint sample is comparable to that of the bright samples presented in the literature, peaking at z ~ 2-3. It is unlikely that a significant population of low redshift GPS quasars is missed due to selection effects in our sample. We therefore claim that there is a genuine difference between the redshift distributions of GPS galaxies and quasars, which, because it is present in both the radio-faint and bright samples, can not be due to a redshift-luminosity degeneracy. It is therefore unlikely that the GPS quasars and galaxies are unified by orientation, unless the quasar opening angle is a strong function of redshift. We suggest that the GPS quasars and galaxies are unrelated populations and just happen to have identical observed radio-spectral properties, and hypothesise that GPS quasars are a sub-class of flat spectrum quasars.
  • GPS sources are the objects of choice to study the initial evolution of extragalactic radio sources, since it is most likely that they are the young counterparts of large scale radio sources. Correlations found between their peak frequency, peak flux density and angular size provide strong evidence that synchrotron self absorption is the cause of the spectral turnovers, and indicate that young radio sources evolve in a self-similar way. The difference in redshift distribution between young and old radio sources must be due to a difference in slope of their luminosity functions, and we argue that this slope is strongly affected by the luminosity evolution of the individual sources. A luminosity evolution scenario is proposed in which GPS sources increase in luminosity and large scale radio sources decrease in luminosity with time. It is shown that such a scenario agrees with the local luminosity function of GPS galaxies.
  • A sample of 47 faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources selected from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS, Rengelink et al. 1997), has been imaged in the optical and near infrared, resulting in an identification fraction of 87%. The R-I and R-K colours of the faint optical counterparts are as expected for passively evolving elliptical galaxies, assuming that they follow the R band Hubble diagram as determined for radio-bright GPS galaxies. We have found evidence that the radio spectral properties of the GPS quasars are different from those of GPS galaxies: The observed distribution of radio spectral peak frequencies for GPS sources optically identified with bright stellar objects (presumably quasars) is shifted compared with GPS sources identified with faint or extended optical objects (presumably galaxies), in the sense that a GPS quasar is likely to have a higher peak frequency than a GPS galaxy. This means that the true peak frequency distribution is different for the GPS galaxies and quasars, because the sample selection effects are independent of optical identification. The correlation between peak frequency and redshift as has been suggested for bright sources has not been found in this sample; no correlation exists between R magnitude (and therefore redshift) and peak frequency for the GPS galaxies. We therefore believe that the claimed correlation is actually caused by the dependence of the peak frequency on optical host, because the GPS galaxies are in general at lower redshifts than the quasars. The difference in the peak frequency distributions of the GPS galaxies and quasars is further evidence against the hypothesis that they form a single class of object.
  • A third possible explanation for the X-ray emission from the z=2.156 radio galaxy 1138-262 is thermal emission from a very dense, sub-cluster `halo', perhaps associated with the (forming) cD galaxy on a scale < 100 kpc. For instance, increasing the gas density from 0.01 cm^{-3} to 0.1 cm^{-3} would decrease the required hot gas mass by the same factor, and could possibly alleviate constraints on cosmological structure formation models. The pressure in this gas would be very high (10^{-9} dynes cm^{-2}), comparable to the pressure in the optical line emitting nebulosity and to the minimum pressure in the radio source, and the cooling time would be short (< fewx10^{8} years). Circumstantial evidence for such very dense, hot gas enveloping some high z radio sources has been reviewed by Fabian et al. (1986). Fabian (1991) suggests that in some cases the `inferred pressures are close to the maximum that can be obtained by gas cooling in a potential well of a galaxy' (ie. the cooling time = gravitational free-fall time), and he designates such systems as `maximal cooling flows', with implied cooling flow rates up to 2000 M_solar year^{-1}. High resolution X-ray imaging with AXAF should be able to test whether 1138-262 has a normal cluster atmosphere, a `maximal cooling flow', or an unusually X-ray loud AGN.
  • We present X-ray observations of the narrow line radio galaxy 1138-262 at z = 2.156 with the High Resolution Imager (HRI) on ROSAT. Observations at other wave-bands, and in particular extremely high values of Faraday rotation of the polarized radio emission, suggest that the 1138-262 radio source is in a dense environment, perhaps a hot, cluster-type atmosphere. We detect X-ray emission from the vicinity of 1138-262, and we discuss possible origins for this emission. The X-ray, optical, and radio data all favor thermal emission from a hot cluster atmosphere as the mechanism responsible for the X-rays, although we cannot rule out a contribution from the active nucleus. If this interpretation is correct, then 1138-262 becomes the most distant, by far, of known X-ray emitting clusters. The X-ray luminosity for 1138-262 is 6.7+/-1.3 x 10**44 ergs/sec for emitted energies between 2 keV and 10 keV.
  • We present the discovery and detailed observations of the radio galaxy 1243+036 (=4C 03.24) at a redshift of $z=3.57$. The most spectacular feature of 1243+036 is the presence of a Ly$\alpha$ halo of luminosity $\sim10^{44.5}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ which extends over$\sim20''$ (135 kpc). The narrow band imaging and the high resolution spectroscopy show that the Ly$\alpha$ gas has three distinct components: (i) gas with a high velocity dispersion (1550 km s$^{-1}$ FWHM) located inside the radio structure, (ii) enhanced Ly$\alpha$ emission blue shifted by 1100 km s$^{-1}$ at the location of the strong bend in the radio jet and (iii) Ly$\alpha$ emission extending out well beyond the radio lobes. This emission has a low velocity dispersion (250 km s$^{-1}$ FWHM) and a velocity gradient of 450 km s$^{-1}$ over the extent of the emission, indicative of large scale rotation. On the basis of these obserserations various mechanisms for the origin and kinematics of the Ly$\alpha$ halo are discussed.