• Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • We have developed a method for detecting clusters in large imaging surveys, based on the detection of structures in galaxy density maps made in slices of photometric redshifts. This method was first applied to the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) Deep 1 field by Mazure et al. (2007), then to all the Deep and Wide CFHTLS fields available in the T0004 data release by Adami et al. (2010). The validity of the cluster detection rate was estimated by applying the same procedure to galaxies from the Millennium simulation. Here we analyse with the same method the full CFHTLS Wide survey, based on the T0006 data release. In a total area of 154 deg2, we have detected 4061 candidate clusters at 3sigma or above (6802 at 2sigma and above), in the redshift range 0.1<=z<=1.15, with estimated mean masses between 1.3 10^14 and 12.6 10^14 M_solar. This catalogue of candidate clusters will be available online via VizieR. We compare our detections with those made in various CFHTLS analyses with other methods. By stacking a subsample of clusters, we show that this subsample has typical cluster characteristics (colour-magnitude relation, galaxy luminosity function). We also confirm that the cluster-cluster correlation function is comparable to that obtained for other cluster surveys and analyze large scale filamentary galaxy distributions. We have increased the number of known optical high redshift cluster candidates by a large factor, an important step towards obtaining reliable cluster counts to measure cosmological parameters. The clusters that we detect behave as expected for a sample of clusters fed by filaments at the intersection of which they are located.
  • In order to enlarge publicly available optical cluster catalogs, in particular at high redshift, we have performed a systematic search for clusters of galaxies in the CFHTLS. We used the Le Phare photometric redshifts for the galaxies detected with magnitude limits of i'=25 and 23 for the Deep and Wide fields respectively. We then constructed galaxy density maps in photometric redshift bins of 0.1 based on an adaptive kernel technique and detected structures with SExtractor. In order to assess the validity of our cluster detection rates, we applied a similar procedure to galaxies in Millennium simulations. We measured the correlation function of our cluster candidates. We analyzed large scale properties and substructures by applying a minimal spanning tree algorithm both to our data and to the Millennium simulations. We have detected 1200 candidate clusters with various masses (minimal masses between 1.0 10$^{13}$ and 5.5 10$^{13}$ and mean masses between 1.3 10$^{14}$ and 12.6 10$^{14}$ M$_\odot$), thus notably increasing the number of known high redshift cluster candidates. We found a correlation function for these objects comparable to that obtained for high redshift cluster surveys. We also show that the CFHTLS deep survey is able to trace the large scale structure of the universe up to z$\geq$1. Our detections are fully consistent with those made in various CFHTLS analyses with other methods. We now need accurate mass determinations of these structures to constrain cosmological parameters.
  • The cosmic time around the z~1 redshift range appears crucial in the cluster and galaxy evolution, since it is probably the epoch of the first mature galaxy clusters. Our knowledge of the properties of the galaxy populations in these clusters is limited because only a handful of z~1 clusters are presently known. In this framework, we report the discovery of a z~0.87 cluster and study its properties at various wavelengths. We gathered X-ray and optical data (imaging and spectroscopy), and near and far infrared data (imaging) in order to confirm the cluster nature of our candidate, to determine its dynamical state, and to give insight on its galaxy population evolution. Our candidate structure appears to be a massive z~0.87 dynamically young cluster with an atypically high X-ray temperature as compared to its X-ray luminosity. It exhibits a significant percentage ~90% of galaxies that are also detected in the 24micron band. The cluster RXJ1257.2+4738 appears to be still in the process of collapsing. Its relatively high temperature is probably the consequence of significant energy input into the intracluster medium besides the regular gravitational infall contribution. A significant part of its galaxies are red objects that are probably dusty with on-going star formation.
  • Environmental effects have an important influence on cluster galaxies, but studies at very faint magnitudes (R>21) are almost exclusively based on imaging. We present here a very deep spectroscopic survey of galaxies on the line of sight to Coma, based on redshifts obtained with VLT/VIMOS for 715 galaxies in the unprecedented magnitude range 21<R<23 (absolute magnitude -14 to -12). We confirm the substructures previously identified in Coma by Adami et al. (2005a), and identify three new ones. We detect many groups behind Coma: a large structure at z~0.5, the SDSS Great Wall, and a large and very young structure at z~0.054. These structures account for the mass maps derived from a recent weak lensing analysis by Gavazzi et al. (2009). The orbits of dwarf galaxies are probably anisotropic and radial, and could originate from field galaxies radially falling into the cluster. Spectral characteristics of Coma dwarf galaxies show that red or absorption line galaxies have larger stellar masses and are older than blue or emission line galaxies. R<22 galaxies show less prominent absorption lines than R>22 galaxies. This trend is less clear for field galaxies, suggesting that part of the faint Coma galaxies could have been recently injected from the field following the NGC 4911 group infall. We present a list of five Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxy candidates. We also globally confirm spectroscopically our previous results on the galaxy luminosity functions and find that dwarf galaxies follow a red sequence similar to that drawn by bright galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are very abundant in Coma, and are partly field galaxies that have fallen onto the cluster along filaments.
  • Using archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data on 35 galaxy clusters, we measured average temperature and metallicity profiles for clusters based separated by temperature, cooling time, and redshift. Our results show no evidence for significant changes in the metallicity or temperature profiles with redshift once these selection effects are taken into account.
  • We have then searched for preferential orientations of faint galaxies in the Coma cluster (down I_Vega~-11.5). By applying a deconvolution method to deep u* and I band images of the Coma cluster, we were able to recover orientations down to faint magnitudes. No preferential orientations are found in more than 95% of the cluster, and the brighter the galaxies, the fewer preferential orientations. The minor axes of late type galaxies are radially oriented along a northeast -southwest direction and are oriented north-south in the western X-ray sub- structures. For early type galaxies, in the western regions showing significant preferential orientations, galaxy major axes are oriented perpendicularly to the north-south direction. In the eastern significant region and close to NGC 4889, galaxy major axes also point toward the 2 cluster dominant galaxies. In the southern significant regions, galaxy planes are tangential with respect to the clustercentric direction, except close to (alpha=194.8, delta=27.65) where the orientation is close to -15deg. Part of the orientations of the minor axes of late type galaxies and of the major axes of early type galaxies can be explained by a tidal torque model applied to cosmological filaments and local merging directions. Another part (close to NGC4889) can be accounted for by collimated infalls. For early type galaxies, the (alpha=194.8, delta=27.65) region shows orientations that probably result from processes involving induced star formation.
  • We investigate the Coma cluster galaxy luminosity function (GLF) at faint magnitudes, in particular in the u* band by applying photometric redshift techniques applied to deep u*, B, V, R, I images covering a region of ~1deg2 (R 24). Global and local GLFs in the B, V, R and I bands obtained with photometric redshift selection are consistent with our previous results based on a statistical background subtraction. In the area covered only by the u* image, the GLF was also derived after applying a statistical background subtraction. The GLF in the u* band shows an increase of the faint end slope towards the outer regions of the cluster (from alpha~1 in the cluster center to alpha~2 in the cluster periphery). This could be explained assuming a short burst of star formation in these galaxies when entering the cluster. The analysis of the multicolor type spatial distribution reveals that late type galaxies are distributed in clumps in the cluster outskirts, where X-ray substructures are also detected and where the GLF in the u* band is steeper.
  • We report on our search for distant clusters of galaxies based on optical and X-ray follow up observations of X-ray candidates from the SHARC survey. Based on the assumption that the absence of bright optical or radio counterparts to possibly extended X-ray sources could be distant clusters. We have obtained deep optical images and redshifts for several of these objects and analyzed archive XMM-Newton or Chandra data where applicable. In our list of candidate clusters, two are probably galaxy structures at redshifts of z$\sim$0.51 and 0.28. Seven other structures are possibly galaxy clusters between z$\sim$0.3 and 1. Three sources are identified with QSOs and are thus likely to be X-ray point sources, and six more also probably fall in this category. One X-ray source is spurious or variable. For 17 other sources, the data are too sparse at this time to put forward any hypothesis on their nature. We also serendipitously detected a cluster at z=0.53 and another galaxy concentration which is probably a structure with a redshift in the [0.15-0.6] range. We discuss these results within the context of future space missions to demonstrate the necessity of a wide field of view telescope optimized for the 0.5-2 keV range.
  • This is a report of Chandra, XMM-Newton, HST and ARC observations of an extended X-ray source at z = 0.59. The apparent member galaxies range from spiral to elliptical and are all relatively red (i'-Ks about 3). We interpret this object to be a fossil group based on the difference between the brightness of the first and second brightest cluster members in the i'-band, and because the rest-frame bolometric X-ray luminosity is about 9.2x10^43 h70^-2 erg s^-1. This makes Cl 1205+44 the highest redshift fossil group yet reported. The system also contains a central double-lobed radio galaxy which appears to be growing via the accretion of smaller galaxies. We discuss the formation and evolution of fossil groups in light of the high redshift of Cl 1205+44.
  • In this paper, we present an analysis of the dynamics and segregation of galaxies in rich clusters from z~0.32 to z~0.48 taken from the CFHT Optical PDCS (COP) survey and from the CNOC survey (Carlberg et al. 1997). Our results from the COP survey are based upon the recent observational work of Adami et al. (2000) and Holden et al. (2000) and use new spectroscopic and photometric data on six clusters selected from the Palomar Distant Cluster Survey (PDCS; Postman et al. 1996). We have compared the COP and CNOC samples to the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS: z~0.07). Our sample shows that the z<0.4 clusters have the same velocity dispersion versus magnitude, morphological type and radius relationships as nearby Abell clusters. The z~0.48 clusters exhibit, however, departures from these relations. Furthermore, there appears to be a higher fraction of late-type (or bluer, e.g. Butcher and Oemler, 1984) galaxies in the distant clusters compared to the nearby ones. The classical scenario in which massive galaxies virialize before they evolve from late into early type explain our observations. In such a scenario, the clusters of our sample began to form before a redshift of ~0.8 and the late-type galaxy population had a continuous infall into the clusters.
  • This paper presents and gives the COP (COP: CFHT Optical PDCS; CFHT: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope; PDCS: Palomar Distant Cluster Survey) survey data. We describe our photometric and spectroscopic observations with the MOS multi-slit spectrograph at the CFH telescope. A comparison of the photometry from the PDCS (Postman et al. 1996) catalogs and from the new images we have obtained at the CFH telescope shows that the different magnitude systems can be cross-calibrated. After identification between the PDCS catalogues and our new images, we built catalogues with redshift, coordinates and V, I and Rmagnitudes. We have classified the galaxies along the lines of sight into field and structure galaxies using a gap technique (Katgert et al. 1996). In total we have observed 18 significant structures along the 10 lines of sight.
  • Our previous study of the faint end (R$\leq$21.5) of the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) was based on spectroscopic data in a small region near the Coma cluster center. In this previous study Adami et al. (1998) suggested, with moderate statistical significance, that the number of galaxies actually belonging to the cluster was much smaller than expected. This led us to increase our spectroscopic sample. Here, we have improved the statistical significance of the results of the Coma GLF faint end study (R$\leq$22.5) by using a sample of 85 redshifts. This includes both new spectroscopic data and a literature compilation. The relatively small number of faint galaxies belonging to Coma that was suggested by Adami et al. (1998) and Secker et al. (1998) has been confirmed with these new observations. We also confirm that the color-magnitude relation is not well suited for finding the galaxies inside the Coma cluster core, close to the center at magnitudes fainter than R$\sim$19. We show that there is an enhancement in the Coma line of sight of field galaxies compared to classical field counts. This can be explained by the contribution of groups and of a distant $z\sim 0.5$ cluster along the line of sight. The result is that the Coma GLF appears to turn-over or at least to become flat for the faint galaxies. We suggest that this is due to environmental effects.
  • We have performed simulations of the effectiveness of the Serendipitous High-redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster (SHARC) survey for various model universes. We find, in agreement with work based on a preliminary set of simulations no statistically significant evolution of the luminosity function out to z = 0.8.
  • We present the results of a search for low surface brightness galaxies (hereafter LSBs) in the Coma cluster. Bernstein et al. report on deep CCD observations in R of a 7.5 by 7.5 arcminute region in the core of the Coma cluster, and we extend this work by finding and measuring 36 LSBs within this field. We report both R and Bj results. The average magnitude based on the best fit exponential to the images is 22.5 (R) and the typical exponential scale is 1.3 arcseconds. The range of exponential scales is 0.4 to 1.2 kpc (distance modulus 34.89), and the range of central surface brightnesses is 24 to 27.4 R magnitudes per square arcsecond. Many of these objects are similar in terms of scale length and central surface brightness to those found by others in nearby clusters such as Fornax (Bothun, Impey and Malin), as well as in the low luminosity end of the dwarfs cataloged in the review by Ferguson and Binggeli. We find no evidence for a dependence of color on central surface brightness or on distance from the D galaxies or the X-ray center of Coma. We also find that these LSBs make a small contribution to the overall mass of the cluster. We discuss these results in terms of possible scenarios of LSB formation and evolution.