• We consider the $(\ell_p,\ell_r)$-Grothendieck problem, which seeks to maximize the bilinear form $y^T A x$ for an input matrix $A$ over vectors $x,y$ with $\|x\|_p=\|y\|_r=1$. The problem is equivalent to computing the $p \to r^*$ operator norm of $A$. The case $p=r=\infty$ corresponds to the classical Grothendieck problem. Our main result is an algorithm for arbitrary $p,r \ge 2$ with approximation ratio $(1+\epsilon_0)/(\sinh^{-1}(1)\cdot \gamma_{p^*} \,\gamma_{r^*})$ for some fixed $\epsilon_0 \le 0.00863$. Comparing this with Krivine's approximation ratio of $(\pi/2)/\sinh^{-1}(1)$ for the original Grothendieck problem, our guarantee is off from the best known hardness factor of $(\gamma_{p^*} \gamma_{r^*})^{-1}$ for the problem by a factor similar to Krivine's defect. Our approximation follows by bounding the value of the natural vector relaxation for the problem which is convex when $p,r \ge 2$. We give a generalization of random hyperplane rounding and relate the performance of this rounding to certain hypergeometric functions, which prescribe necessary transformations to the vector solution before the rounding is applied. Unlike Krivine's Rounding where the relevant hypergeometric function was $\arcsin$, we have to study a family of hypergeometric functions. The bulk of our technical work then involves methods from complex analysis to gain detailed information about the Taylor series coefficients of the inverses of these hypergeometric functions, which then dictate our approximation factor. Our result also implies improved bounds for "factorization through $\ell_{2}^{\,n}$" of operators from $\ell_{p}^{\,n}$ to $\ell_{q}^{\,m}$ (when $p\geq 2 \geq q$)--- such bounds are of significant interest in functional analysis and our work provides modest supplementary evidence for an intriguing parallel between factorizability, and constant-factor approximability.
  • We study the problem of computing the $p\rightarrow q$ norm of a matrix $A \in R^{m \times n}$, defined as \[ \|A\|_{p\rightarrow q} ~:=~ \max_{x \,\in\, R^n \setminus \{0\}} \frac{\|Ax\|_q}{\|x\|_p} \] This problem generalizes the spectral norm of a matrix ($p=q=2$) and the Grothendieck problem ($p=\infty$, $q=1$), and has been widely studied in various regimes. When $p \geq q$, the problem exhibits a dichotomy: constant factor approximation algorithms are known if $2 \in [q,p]$, and the problem is hard to approximate within almost polynomial factors when $2 \notin [q,p]$. The regime when $p < q$, known as \emph{hypercontractive norms}, is particularly significant for various applications but much less well understood. The case with $p = 2$ and $q > 2$ was studied by [Barak et al, STOC'12] who gave sub-exponential algorithms for a promise version of the problem (which captures small-set expansion) and also proved hardness of approximation results based on the Exponential Time Hypothesis. However, no NP-hardness of approximation is known for these problems for any $p < q$. We study the hardness of approximating matrix norms in both the above cases and prove the following results: - We show that for any $1< p < q < \infty$ with $2 \notin [p,q]$, $\|A\|_{p\rightarrow q}$ is hard to approximate within $2^{O(\log^{1-\epsilon}\!n)}$ assuming $NP \not\subseteq BPTIME(2^{\log^{O(1)}\!n})$. This suggests that, similar to the case of $p \geq q$, the hypercontractive setting may be qualitatively different when $2$ does not lie between $p$ and $q$. - For all $p \geq q$ with $2 \in [q,p]$, we show $\|A\|_{p\rightarrow q}$ is hard to approximate within any factor than $1/(\gamma_{p^*} \cdot \gamma_q)$, where for any $r$, $\gamma_r$ denotes the $r^{th}$ norm of a gaussian, and $p^*$ is the dual norm of $p$.
  • We consider the following basic problem: given an $n$-variate degree-$d$ homogeneous polynomial $f$ with real coefficients, compute a unit vector $x \in \mathbb{R}^n$ that maximizes $|f(x)|$. Besides its fundamental nature, this problem arises in diverse contexts ranging from tensor and operator norms to graph expansion to quantum information theory. The homogeneous degree $2$ case is efficiently solvable as it corresponds to computing the spectral norm of an associated matrix, but the higher degree case is NP-hard. We give approximation algorithms for this problem that offer a trade-off between the approximation ratio and running time: in $n^{O(q)}$ time, we get an approximation within factor $O_d((n/q)^{d/2-1})$ for arbitrary polynomials, $O_d((n/q)^{d/4-1/2})$ for polynomials with non-negative coefficients, and $O_d(\sqrt{m/q})$ for sparse polynomials with $m$ monomials. The approximation guarantees are with respect to the optimum of the level-$q$ sum-of-squares (SoS) SDP relaxation of the problem. Known polynomial time algorithms for this problem rely on "decoupling lemmas." Such tools are not capable of offering a trade-off like our results as they blow up the number of variables by a factor equal to the degree. We develop new decoupling tools that are more efficient in the number of variables at the expense of less structure in the output polynomials. This enables us to harness the benefits of higher level SoS relaxations. We complement our algorithmic results with some polynomially large integrality gaps, albeit for a slightly weaker (but still very natural) relaxation. Toward this, we give a method to lift a level-$4$ solution matrix $M$ to a higher level solution, under a mild technical condition on $M$.
  • We study the approximability of constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) by linear programming (LP) relaxations. We show that for every CSP, the approximation obtained by a basic LP relaxation, is no weaker than the approximation obtained using relaxations given by $\Omega\left(\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}\right)$ levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy on instances of size $n$. It was proved by Chan et al. [FOCS 2013] that any polynomial size LP extended formulation is no stronger than relaxations obtained by a super-constant levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy.. Combining this with our result also implies that any polynomial size LP extended formulation is no stronger than the basic LP. Using our techniques, we also simplify and strengthen the result by Khot et al. [STOC 2014] on (strong) approximation resistance for LPs. They provided a necessary and sufficient condition under which $\Omega(\log \log n)$ levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy cannot achieve an approximation better than a random assignment. We simplify their proof and strengthen the bound to $\Omega\left(\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}\right)$ levels.
  • We give an arithmetic version of the recent proof of the triangle removal lemma by Fox [Fox11], for the group $\mathbb{F}_2^n$. A triangle in $\mathbb{F}_2^n$ is a triple $(x,y,z)$ such that $x+y+z = 0$. The triangle removal lemma for $\mathbb{F}_2^n$ states that for every $\epsilon > 0$ there is a $\delta > 0$, such that if a subset $A$ of $\mathbb{F}_2^n$ requires the removal of at least $\epsilon \cdot 2^n$ elements to make it triangle-free, then it must contain at least $\delta \cdot 2^{2n}$ triangles. This problem was first studied by Green [Gre05] who proved a lower bound on $\delta$ using an arithmetic regularity lemma. Regularity based lower bounds for triangle removal in graphs were recently improved by Fox and we give a direct proof of an analogous improvement for triangle removal in $\mathbb{F}_2^n$. The improved lower bound was already known to follow (for triangle-removal in all groups), using Fox's removal lemma for directed cycles and a reduction by Kr\'{a}l, Serra and Vena [KSV09] (see [Fox11,CF13]). The purpose of this note is to provide a direct Fourier-analytic proof for the group $\mathbb{F}_2^n.$
  • In analogy with the regularity lemma of Szemer\'edi, regularity lemmas for polynomials shown by Green and Tao (Contrib. Discrete Math. 2009) and by Kaufman and Lovett (FOCS 2008) modify a given collection of polynomials \calF = {P_1,...,P_m} to a new collection \calF' so that the polynomials in \calF' are "pseudorandom". These lemmas have various applications, such as (special cases) of Reed-Muller testing and worst-case to average-case reductions for polynomials. However, the transformation from \calF to \calF' is not algorithmic for either regularity lemma. We define new notions of regularity for polynomials, which are analogous to the above, but which allow for an efficient algorithm to compute the pseudorandom collection \calF'. In particular, when the field is of high characteristic, in polynomial time, we can refine \calF into \calF' where every nonzero linear combination of polynomials in \calF' has desirably small Gowers norm. Using the algorithmic regularity lemmas, we show that if a polynomial P of degree d is within (normalized) Hamming distance 1-1/|F| -\eps of some unknown polynomial of degree k over a prime field F (for k < d < |F|), then there is an efficient algorithm for finding a degree-k polynomial Q, which is within distance 1-1/|F| -\eta of P, for some \eta depending on \eps. This can be thought of as decoding the Reed-Muller code of order k beyond the list decoding radius (finding one close codeword), when the received word P itself is a polynomial of degree d (with k < d < |F|). We also obtain an algorithmic version of the worst-case to average-case reductions by Kaufman and Lovett. They show that if a polynomial of degree d can be weakly approximated by a polynomial of lower degree, then it can be computed exactly using a collection of polynomials of degree at most d-1. We give an efficient (randomized) algorithm to find this collection.
  • A predicate f:{-1,1}^k -> {0,1} with \rho(f) = \frac{|f^{-1}(1)|}{2^k} is called {\it approximation resistant} if given a near-satisfiable instance of CSP(f), it is computationally hard to find an assignment that satisfies at least \rho(f)+\Omega(1) fraction of the constraints. We present a complete characterization of approximation resistant predicates under the Unique Games Conjecture. We also present characterizations in the {\it mixed} linear and semi-definite programming hierarchy and the Sherali-Adams linear programming hierarchy. In the former case, the characterization coincides with the one based on UGC. Each of the two characterizations is in terms of existence of a probability measure with certain symmetry properties on a natural convex polytope associated with the predicate.
  • The k-fold Cartesian product of a graph G is defined as a graph on k-tuples of vertices, where two tuples are connected if they form an edge in one of the positions and are equal in the rest. Starting with G as a single edge gives G^k as a k-dimensional hypercube. We study the distributions of edges crossed by a cut in G^k across the copies of G in different positions. This is a generalization of the notion of influences for cuts on the hypercube. We show the analogues of results of Kahn, Kalai, and Linial (KKL Theorem [KahnKL88]) and that of Friedgut (Friedgut's Junta theorem [Friedgut98]), for the setting of Cartesian products of arbitrary graphs. Our proofs extend the arguments of Rossignol [Rossignol06] and of Falik and Samorodnitsky [FalikS07], to the case of arbitrary Cartesian products. We also extend the work on studying isoperimetric constants for these graphs [HoudreT96, ChungT98] to the value of semidefinite relaxations for edge-expansion. We connect the optimal values of the relaxations for computing expansion, given by various semidefinite hierarchies, for G and G^k.
  • We give new combinatorial proofs of known almost-periodicity results for sumsets of sets with small doubling in the spirit of Croot and Sisask, whose almost-periodicity lemma has had far-reaching implications in additive combinatorics. We provide an alternative (and L^p-norm free) point of view, which allows for proofs to easily be converted to probabilistic algorithms that decide membership in almost-periodic sumsets of dense subsets of F_2^n. As an application, we give a new algorithmic version of the quasipolynomial Bogolyubov-Ruzsa lemma recently proved by Sanders. Together with the results by the last two authors, this implies an algorithmic version of the quadratic Goldreich-Levin theorem in which the number of terms in the quadratic Fourier decomposition of a given function is quasipolynomial in the error parameter, compared with an exponential dependence previously proved by the authors. It also improves the running time of the algorithm to have quasipolynomial dependence instead of an exponential one. We also give an application to the problem of finding large subspaces in sumsets of dense sets. Green showed that the sumset of a dense subset of F_2^n contains a large subspace. Using Fourier analytic methods, Sanders proved that such a subspace must have dimension bounded below by a constant times the density times n. We provide an alternative (and L^p norm-free) proof of a comparable bound, which is analogous to a recent result of Croot, Laba and Sisask in the integers.
  • Decomposition theorems in classical Fourier analysis enable us to express a bounded function in terms of few linear phases with large Fourier coefficients plus a part that is pseudorandom with respect to linear phases. The Goldreich-Levin algorithm can be viewed as an algorithmic analogue of such a decomposition as it gives a way to efficiently find the linear phases associated with large Fourier coefficients. In the study of "quadratic Fourier analysis", higher-degree analogues of such decompositions have been developed in which the pseudorandomness property is stronger but the structured part correspondingly weaker. For example, it has previously been shown that it is possible to express a bounded function as a sum of a few quadratic phases plus a part that is small in the $U^3$ norm, defined by Gowers for the purpose of counting arithmetic progressions of length 4. We give a polynomial time algorithm for computing such a decomposition. A key part of the algorithm is a local self-correction procedure for Reed-Muller codes of order 2 (over $\F_2^n$) for a function at distance $1/2-\epsilon$ from a codeword. Given a function $f:\F_2^n \to \{-1,1\}$ at fractional Hamming distance $1/2-\epsilon$ from a quadratic phase (which is a codeword of Reed-Muller code of order 2), we give an algorithm that runs in time polynomial in $n$ and finds a codeword at distance at most $1/2-\eta$ for $\eta = \eta(\epsilon)$. This is an algorithmic analogue of Samorodnitsky's result, which gave a tester for the above problem. To our knowledge, it represents the first instance of a correction procedure for any class of codes, beyond the list-decoding radius. In the process, we give algorithmic versions of results from additive combinatorics used in Samorodnitsky's proof and a refined version of the inverse theorem for the Gowers $U^3$ norm over $\F_2^n$.
  • The subspace approximation problem Subspace($k$,$p$) asks for a $k$-dimensional linear subspace that fits a given set of points optimally, where the error for fitting is a generalization of the least squares fit and uses the $\ell_{p}$ norm instead. Most of the previous work on subspace approximation has focused on small or constant $k$ and $p$, using coresets and sampling techniques from computational geometry. In this paper, extending another line of work based on convex relaxation and rounding, we give a polynomial time algorithm, \emph{for any $k$ and any $p \geq 2$}, with the approximation guarantee roughly $\gamma_{p} \sqrt{2 - \frac{1}{n-k}}$, where $\gamma_{p}$ is the $p$-th moment of a standard normal random variable N(0,1). We show that the convex relaxation we use has an integrality gap (or "rank gap") of $\gamma_{p} (1 - \epsilon)$, for any constant $\epsilon > 0$. Finally, we show that assuming the Unique Games Conjecture, the subspace approximation problem is hard to approximate within a factor better than $\gamma_{p} (1 - \epsilon)$, for any constant $\epsilon > 0$.
  • The Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis (Raghavendra, Steurer, STOC 2010) is a natural hardness assumption concerning the problem of approximating the edge expansion of small sets in graphs. This hardness assumption is closely connected to the Unique Games Conjecture (Khot, STOC 2002). In particular, the Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis implies the Unique Games Conjecture (Raghavendra, Steurer, STOC 2010). Our main result is that the Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis is in fact equivalent to a variant of the Unique Games Conjecture. More precisely, the hypothesis is equivalent to the Unique Games Conjecture restricted to instance with a fairly mild condition on the expansion of small sets. Alongside, we obtain the first strong hardness of approximation results for the Balanced Separator and Minimum Linear Arrangement problems. Before, no such hardness was known for these problems even assuming the Unique Games Conjecture. These results not only establish the Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis as a natural unifying hypothesis that implies the Unique Games Conjecture, all its consequences and, in addition, hardness results for other problems like Balanced Separator and Minimum Linear Arrangement, but our results also show that the Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis problem lies at the combinatorial heart of the Unique Games Conjecture. The key technical ingredient is a new way of exploiting the structure of the Unique Games instances obtained from the Small-Set Expansion Hypothesis via (Raghavendra, Steurer, 2010). This additional structure allows us to modify standard reductions in a way that essentially destroys their local-gadget nature. Using this modification, we can argue about the expansion in the graphs produced by the reduction without relying on expansion properties of the underlying Unique Games instance (which would be impossible for a local-gadget reduction).
  • In this paper we will be concerned with a class of packing and covering problems which includes Vertex Cover and Independent Set. Typically, one can write an LP relaxation and then round the solution. In this paper, we explain why the simple LP-based rounding algorithm for the \\VC problem is optimal assuming the UGC. Complementing Raghavendra's result, our result generalizes to a class of strict, covering/packing type CSPs.
  • Green, Tao and Ziegler prove ``Dense Model Theorems'' of the following form: if R is a (possibly very sparse) pseudorandom subset of set X, and D is a dense subset of R, then D may be modeled by a set M whose density inside X is approximately the same as the density of D in R. More generally, they show that a function that is majorized by a pseudorandom measure can be written as a sum of a bounded function having the same expectation plus a function that is ``indistinguishable from zero.'' This theorem plays a key role in the proof of the Green-Tao Theorem that the primes contain arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions. In this note, we present a new proof of the Green-Tao-Ziegler Dense Model Theorem, which was discovered independently by ourselves and Gowers. We refer to our full paper for variants of the result with connections and applications to computational complexity theory, and to Gowers' paper for applications of the proof technique to ``decomposition, ``structure,'' and ``transference'' theorems in arithmetic and extremal combinatorics (as well as a broader survey of such theorems).