• In this paper we study the problem of learning a shallow artificial neural network that best fits a training data set. We study this problem in the over-parameterized regime where the number of observations are fewer than the number of parameters in the model. We show that with quadratic activations the optimization landscape of training such shallow neural networks has certain favorable characteristics that allow globally optimal models to be found efficiently using a variety of local search heuristics. This result holds for an arbitrary training data of input/output pairs. For differentiable activation functions we also show that gradient descent, when suitably initialized, converges at a linear rate to a globally optimal model. This result focuses on a realizable model where the inputs are chosen i.i.d. from a Gaussian distribution and the labels are generated according to planted weight coefficients.
  • Dealing with the shear size and complexity of today's massive data sets requires computational platforms that can analyze data in a parallelized and distributed fashion. A major bottleneck that arises in such modern distributed computing environments is that some of the worker nodes may run slow. These nodes a.k.a.~stragglers can significantly slow down computation as the slowest node may dictate the overall computational time. A recent computational framework, called encoded optimization, creates redundancy in the data to mitigate the effect of stragglers. In this paper we develop novel mathematical understanding for this framework demonstrating its effectiveness in much broader settings than was previously understood. We also analyze the convergence behavior of iterative encoded optimization algorithms, allowing us to characterize fundamental trade-offs between convergence rate, size of data set, accuracy, computational load (or data redundancy), and straggler toleration in this framework.
  • Fourier ptychographic microscopy enables gigapixel-scale imaging, with both large field-of-view and high resolution. Using a set of low-resolution images that are recorded under varying illumination angles, the goal is to computationally reconstruct high-resolution phase and amplitude images. To increase temporal resolution, one may use multiplexed measurements where the sample is illuminated simultaneously from a subset of the angles. In this paper, we develop an algorithm for Fourier ptychographic microscopy with such multiplexed illumination. Specifically, we consider gradient descent type updates and propose an analytical step size that ensures the convergence of the iterates to a stationary point. Furthermore, we propose an accelerated version of our algorithm (with the same step size) which significantly improves the convergence speed. We demonstrate that the practical performance of our algorithm is identical to the case where the step size is manually tuned. Finally, we apply our parameter-free approach to real data and validate its applicability.
  • In this paper, we study the problem of maximizing continuous submodular functions that naturally arise in many learning applications such as those involving utility functions in active learning and sensing, matrix approximations and network inference. Despite the apparent lack of convexity in such functions, we prove that stochastic projected gradient methods can provide strong approximation guarantees for maximizing continuous submodular functions with convex constraints. More specifically, we prove that for monotone continuous DR-submodular functions, all fixed points of projected gradient ascent provide a factor $1/2$ approximation to the global maxima. We also study stochastic gradient and mirror methods and show that after $\mathcal{O}(1/\epsilon^2)$ iterations these methods reach solutions which achieve in expectation objective values exceeding $(\frac{\text{OPT}}{2}-\epsilon)$. An immediate application of our results is to maximize submodular functions that are defined stochastically, i.e. the submodular function is defined as an expectation over a family of submodular functions with an unknown distribution. We will show how stochastic gradient methods are naturally well-suited for this setting, leading to a factor $1/2$ approximation when the function is monotone. In particular, it allows us to approximately maximize discrete, monotone submodular optimization problems via projected gradient descent on a continuous relaxation, directly connecting the discrete and continuous domains. Finally, experiments on real data demonstrate that our projected gradient methods consistently achieve the best utility compared to other continuous baselines while remaining competitive in terms of computational effort.
  • In this paper we study the problem of learning Rectified Linear Units (ReLUs) which are functions of the form $max(0,<w,x>)$ with $w$ denoting the weight vector. We study this problem in the high-dimensional regime where the number of observations are fewer than the dimension of the weight vector. We assume that the weight vector belongs to some closed set (convex or nonconvex) which captures known side-information about its structure. We focus on the realizable model where the inputs are chosen i.i.d.~from a Gaussian distribution and the labels are generated according to a planted weight vector. We show that projected gradient descent, when initialization at 0, converges at a linear rate to the planted model with a number of samples that is optimal up to numerical constants. Our results on the dynamics of convergence of these very shallow neural nets may provide some insights towards understanding the dynamics of deeper architectures.
  • This paper concerns the problem of recovering an unknown but structured signal $x \in R^n$ from $m$ quadratic measurements of the form $y_r=|<a_r,x>|^2$ for $r=1,2,...,m$. We focus on the under-determined setting where the number of measurements is significantly smaller than the dimension of the signal ($m<<n$). We formulate the recovery problem as a nonconvex optimization problem where prior structural information about the signal is enforced through constrains on the optimization variables. We prove that projected gradient descent, when initialized in a neighborhood of the desired signal, converges to the unknown signal at a linear rate. These results hold for any constraint set (convex or nonconvex) providing convergence guarantees to the global optimum even when the objective function and constraint set is nonconvex. Furthermore, these results hold with a number of measurements that is only a constant factor away from the minimal number of measurements required to uniquely identify the unknown signal. Our results provide the first provably tractable algorithm for this data-poor regime, breaking local sample complexity barriers that have emerged in recent literature. In a companion paper we demonstrate favorable properties for the optimization problem that may enable similar results to continue to hold more globally (over the entire ambient space). Collectively these two papers utilize and develop powerful tools for uniform convergence of empirical processes that may have broader implications for rigorous understanding of constrained nonconvex optimization heuristics. The mathematical results in this paper also pave the way for a new generation of data-driven phase-less imaging systems that can utilize prior information to significantly reduce acquisition time and enhance image reconstruction, enabling nano-scale imaging at unprecedented speeds and resolutions.
  • In this paper we study the problem of recovering a structured but unknown parameter ${\bf{\theta}}^*$ from $n$ nonlinear observations of the form $y_i=f(\langle {\bf{x}}_i,{\bf{\theta}}^*\rangle)$ for $i=1,2,\ldots,n$. We develop a framework for characterizing time-data tradeoffs for a variety of parameter estimation algorithms when the nonlinear function $f$ is unknown. This framework includes many popular heuristics such as projected/proximal gradient descent and stochastic schemes. For example, we show that a projected gradient descent scheme converges at a linear rate to a reliable solution with a near minimal number of samples. We provide a sharp characterization of the convergence rate of such algorithms as a function of sample size, amount of a-prior knowledge available about the parameter and a measure of the nonlinearity of the function $f$. These results provide a precise understanding of the various tradeoffs involved between statistical and computational resources as well as a-prior side information available for such nonlinear parameter estimation problems.
  • Line spectral estimation is the problem of recovering the frequencies and amplitudes of a mixture of a few sinusoids from equispaced samples. However, in a variety of signal processing problems arising in imaging, radar, and localization we do not have access directly to such equispaced samples. Rather we only observe a severely undersampled version of these observations through linear measurements. This paper is about such generalized line spectral estimation problems. We reformulate these problems as sparse signal recovery problems over a continuously indexed dictionary which can be solved via a convex program. We prove that the frequencies and amplitudes of the components of the mixture can be recovered perfectly from a near-minimal number of observations via this convex program. This result holds provided the frequencies are sufficiently separated, and the linear measurements obey natural conditions that are satisfied in a variety of applications.
  • High-dimensional data often lie in low-dimensional subspaces corresponding to different classes they belong to. Finding sparse representations of data points in a dictionary built using the collection of data helps to uncover low-dimensional subspaces and address problems such as clustering, classification, subset selection and more. In this paper, we address the problem of recovering sparse representations for noisy data points in a dictionary whose columns correspond to corrupted data lying close to a union of subspaces. We consider a constrained $\ell_1$-minimization and study conditions under which the solution of the proposed optimization satisfies the approximate subspace-sparse recovery condition. More specifically, we show that each noisy data point, perturbed from a subspace by a noise of the magnitude of $\varepsilon$, will be reconstructed using data points from the same subspace with a small error of the order of $O(\varepsilon)$ and that the coefficients corresponding to data points in other subspaces will be sufficiently small, \ie, of the order of $O(\varepsilon)$. We do not impose any randomness assumption on the arrangement of subspaces or distribution of data points in each subspace. Our framework is based on a novel generalization of the null-space property to the setting where data lie in multiple subspaces, the number of data points in each subspace exceeds the dimension of the subspace, and all data points are corrupted by noise. Moreover, assuming a random distribution for data points, we further show that coefficients from the desired support not only reconstruct a given point with high accuracy, but also have sufficiently large values, \ie, of the order of $O(1)$.
  • In this paper we study the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix from linear measurements. Our algorithm, which we call Procrustes Flow, starts from an initial estimate obtained by a thresholding scheme followed by gradient descent on a non-convex objective. We show that as long as the measurements obey a standard restricted isometry property, our algorithm converges to the unknown matrix at a geometric rate. In the case of Gaussian measurements, such convergence occurs for a $n_1 \times n_2$ matrix of rank $r$ when the number of measurements exceeds a constant times $(n_1+n_2)r$.
  • In this paper we characterize sharp time-data tradeoffs for optimization problems used for solving linear inverse problems. We focus on the minimization of a least-squares objective subject to a constraint defined as the sub-level set of a penalty function. We present a unified convergence analysis of the gradient projection algorithm applied to such problems. We sharply characterize the convergence rate associated with a wide variety of random measurement ensembles in terms of the number of measurements and structural complexity of the signal with respect to the chosen penalty function. The results apply to both convex and nonconvex constraints, demonstrating that a linear convergence rate is attainable even though the least squares objective is not strongly convex in these settings. When specialized to Gaussian measurements our results show that such linear convergence occurs when the number of measurements is merely 4 times the minimal number required to recover the desired signal at all (a.k.a. the phase transition). We also achieve a slower but geometric rate of convergence precisely above the phase transition point. Extensive numerical results suggest that the derived rates exactly match the empirical performance.
  • Fourier ptychography is a new computational microscopy technique that provides gigapixel-scale intensity and phase images with both wide field-of-view and high resolution. By capturing a stack of low-resolution images under different illumination angles, a nonlinear inverse algorithm can be used to computationally reconstruct the high-resolution complex field. Here, we compare and classify multiple proposed inverse algorithms in terms of experimental robustness. We find that the main sources of error are noise, aberrations and mis-calibration (i.e. model mis-match). Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that the choice of cost function plays a critical role, with amplitude-based cost functions performing better than intensity-based ones. The reason for this is that Fourier ptychography datasets consist of images from both brightfield and darkfield illumination, representing a large range of measured intensities. Both noise (e.g. Poisson noise) and model mis-match errors are shown to scale with intensity. Hence, algorithms that use an appropriate cost function will be more tolerant to both noise and model mis-match. Given these insights, we propose a global Newton's method algorithm which is robust and computationally efficient. Finally, we discuss the impact of procedures for algorithmic correction of aberrations and mis-calibration.
  • We study the problem of recovering the phase from magnitude measurements; specifically, we wish to reconstruct a complex-valued signal x of C^n about which we have phaseless samples of the form y_r = |< a_r,x >|^2, r = 1,2,...,m (knowledge of the phase of these samples would yield a linear system). This paper develops a non-convex formulation of the phase retrieval problem as well as a concrete solution algorithm. In a nutshell, this algorithm starts with a careful initialization obtained by means of a spectral method, and then refines this initial estimate by iteratively applying novel update rules, which have low computational complexity, much like in a gradient descent scheme. The main contribution is that this algorithm is shown to rigorously allow the exact retrieval of phase information from a nearly minimal number of random measurements. Indeed, the sequence of successive iterates provably converges to the solution at a geometric rate so that the proposed scheme is efficient both in terms of computational and data resources. In theory, a variation on this scheme leads to a near-linear time algorithm for a physically realizable model based on coded diffraction patterns. We illustrate the effectiveness of our methods with various experiments on image data. Underlying our analysis are insights for the analysis of non-convex optimization schemes that may have implications for computational problems beyond phase retrieval.
  • In this paper we show that for the purposes of dimensionality reduction certain class of structured random matrices behave similarly to random Gaussian matrices. This class includes several matrices for which matrix-vector multiply can be computed in log-linear time, providing efficient dimensionality reduction of general sets. In particular, we show that using such matrices any set from high dimensions can be embedded into lower dimensions with near optimal distortion. We obtain our results by connecting dimensionality reduction of any set to dimensionality reduction of sparse vectors via a chaining argument.
  • In this paper we study the identification of a time-varying linear system from its response to a known input signal. More specifically, we consider systems whose response to the input signal is given by a weighted superposition of delayed and Doppler shifted versions of the input. This problem arises in a multitude of applications such as wireless communications and radar imaging. Due to practical constraints, the input signal has finite bandwidth B, and the received signal is observed over a finite time interval of length T only. This gives rise to a delay and Doppler resolution of 1/B and 1/T. We show that this resolution limit can be overcome, i.e., we can exactly recover the continuous delay-Doppler pairs and the corresponding attenuation factors, by solving a convex optimization problem. This result holds provided that the distance between the delay-Doppler pairs is at least 2.37/B in time or 2.37/T in frequency. Furthermore, this result allows the total number of delay-Doppler pairs to be linear up to a log-factor in BT, the dimensionality of the response of the system, and thereby the limit for identifiability. Stated differently, we show that we can estimate the time-frequency components of a signal that is S-sparse in the continuous dictionary of time-frequency shifts of a random window function, from a number of measurements, that is linear up to a log-factor in S.
  • Subspace clustering refers to the task of finding a multi-subspace representation that best fits a collection of points taken from a high-dimensional space. This paper introduces an algorithm inspired by sparse subspace clustering (SSC) [In IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR (2009) 2790-2797] to cluster noisy data, and develops some novel theory demonstrating its correctness. In particular, the theory uses ideas from geometric functional analysis to show that the algorithm can accurately recover the underlying subspaces under minimal requirements on their orientation, and on the number of samples per subspace. Synthetic as well as real data experiments complement our theoretical study, illustrating our approach and demonstrating its effectiveness.
  • This paper considers the question of recovering the phase of an object from intensity-only measurements, a problem which naturally appears in X-ray crystallography and related disciplines. We study a physically realistic setup where one can modulate the signal of interest and then collect the intensity of its diffraction pattern, each modulation thereby producing a sort of coded diffraction pattern. We show that PhaseLift, a recent convex programming technique, recovers the phase information exactly from a number of random modulations, which is polylogarithmic in the number of unknowns. Numerical experiments with noiseless and noisy data complement our theoretical analysis and illustrate our approach.
  • This paper considers the problem of clustering a collection of unlabeled data points assumed to lie near a union of lower-dimensional planes. As is common in computer vision or unsupervised learning applications, we do not know in advance how many subspaces there are nor do we have any information about their dimensions. We develop a novel geometric analysis of an algorithm named sparse subspace clustering (SSC) [In IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2009. CVPR 2009 (2009) 2790-2797. IEEE], which significantly broadens the range of problems where it is provably effective. For instance, we show that SSC can recover multiple subspaces, each of dimension comparable to the ambient dimension. We also prove that SSC can correctly cluster data points even when the subspaces of interest intersect. Further, we develop an extension of SSC that succeeds when the data set is corrupted with possibly overwhelmingly many outliers. Underlying our analysis are clear geometric insights, which may bear on other sparse recovery problems. A numerical study complements our theoretical analysis and demonstrates the effectiveness of these methods.
  • Discussion of "Latent variable graphical model selection via convex optimization" by Venkat Chandrasekaran, Pablo A. Parrilo and Alan S. Willsky [arXiv:1008.1290].
  • Wireless OFDM channels can be approximated by a time varying filter with sparse time domain taps. Recent achievements in sparse signal processing such as compressed sensing have facilitated the use of sparsity in estimation, which improves the performance significantly. The problem of these sparse-based methods is the need for a stable transformation matrix which is not fulfilled in the current transmission setups. To assist the analog filtering at the receiver, the transmitter leaves some of the subcarriers at both edges of the bandwidth unused which results in an ill-conditioned DFT submatrix. To overcome this difficulty we propose Adaptive Thresholding for Sparse Signal Detection (ATSSD). Simulation results confirm that the proposed method works well in time-invariant and specially time-varying channels where other methods may not work as well.
  • In this paper we introduce a new class of codes for over-loaded synchronous wireless CDMA systems which increases the number of users for a fixed number of chips without introducing any errors. In addition these codes support active user detection. We derive an upper bound on the number of users with a fixed spreading factor. Also we propose an ML decoder for a subclass of these codes that is computationally implementable. Although for our simulations we consider a scenario that is worse than what occurs in practice, simulation results indicate that this coding/decoding scheme is robust against additive noise. As an example, for 64 chips and 88 users we propose a coding/decoding scheme that can obtain an arbitrary small probability of error which is computationally feasible and can detect active users. Furthermore, we prove that for this to be possible the number of users cannot be beyond 230.