• We investigated the magnitude-phase relation of (162173) 1999 JU3, a target asteroid for the JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample return mission. We initially employed the international Astronomical Union's H-G formalism but found that it fits less well using a single set of parameters. To improve the inadequate fit, we employed two photometric functions, the Shevchenko and Hapke functions. With the Shevchenko function, we found that the magnitude-phase relation exhibits linear behavior in a wide phase angle range (alpha = 5-75 deg) and shows weak nonlinear opposition brightening at alpha< 5 deg, providing a more reliable absolute magnitude of Hv = 19.25 +- 0.03. The phase slope (0.039 +- 0.001 mag/deg) and opposition effect amplitude (parameterized by the ratio of intensity at alpha=0.3 deg to that at alpha=5 deg, I(0.3)/I(5)=1.31+-0.05) are consistent with those of typical C-type asteroids. We also attempted to determine the parameters for the Hapke model, which are applicable for constructing the surface reflectance map with the Hayabusa 2 onboard cameras. Although we could not constrain the full set of Hapke parameters, we obtained possible values, w=0.041, g=-0.38, B0=1.43, and h=0.050, assuming a surface roughness parameter theta=20 deg. By combining our photometric study with a thermal model of the asteroid (Mueller et al. in preparation), we obtained a geometric albedo of pv = 0.047 +- 0.003, phase integral q = 0.32 +- 0.03, and Bond albedo AB = 0.014 +- 0.002, which are commensurate with the values for common C-type asteroids.
  • We present lightcurve observations and multiband photometry for 107P/Wilson-Harrington using five small- and medium-sized telescopes. The lightcurve has shown a periodicity of 0.2979 day (7.15 hour) and 0.0993 day (2.38 hour), which has a commensurability of 3:1. The physical properties of the lightcurve indicate two models: (1) 107P/Wilson-Harrington is a tumbling object with a sidereal rotation period of 0.2979 day and a precession period of 0.0993 day. The shape has a long axis mode (LAM) of L1:L2:L3 = 1.0:1.0:1.6. The direction of the total rotational angular momentum is around {\lambda} = 310{\deg}, {\beta} = -10{\deg}, or {\lambda} = 132{\deg}, {\beta} = -17{\deg}. The nutation angle is approximately constant at 65{\deg}. (2) 107P/Wilson-Harrington is not a tumbler. The sidereal rotation period is 0.2979 day. The shape is nearly spherical but slightly hexagonal with a short axis mode (SAM) of L1:L2:L3 = 1.5:1.5:1.0. The pole orientation is around {\lambda} = 330{\deg}, {\beta} = -27{\deg}. In addition, the model includes the possibility of binary hosting. For both models, the sense of rotation is retrograde. Furthermore, multiband photometry indicates that the taxonomy class of 107P/Wilson-Harrington is C-type. No clear rotational color variations are confirmed on the surface.
  • The quasi-Hilda comets (QHCs), being in unstable 3:2 Jovian mean motion resonance, are considered a major cause of temporary satellite capture (TSC) by Jupiter. Though the QHCs may be escaped Hilda asteroids, their origin and nature have not yet been studied in sufficient detail. Of particular interest are long TSCs/orbiters. Orbiters -- in which at least one full revolution about the planet is completed -- are rare astronomical events; only four have been known to occur in the last several decades. Every case has been associated with a QHC: 82P/Gehrels 3; 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett; P/1996 R2 (Lagerkvist); and the possibly QHC-derived D/1993 F2 (Shoemaker-Levy 9, SL9). We focus on long TSC/orbiter events involving QHCs and Jupiter. Thus we survey the known QHCs, searching for further long TSCs/orbiters over the past century. First, we confirmed the long TSC/orbiter events of 82P, 111P, and 1996 R2 in order to test our method against previous work, applying a general N-body Newtonian code. We then used the same procedure to survey the remaining known QHCs and search for long TSC/orbiter events. We newly identified another long TSC/orbiter: 147P/Kushida-Muramatsu from 1949 May 14 (+97days/-106 days)--1961 July 15. Our result is verified by integrations of 243 cloned orbits which take account of the present orbital uncertainty of this comet. This is the third long TSC and the fifth orbiter to be found, thus long TSC/orbiter events involving Jupiter have occurred once per decade. Two full revolutions about Jupiter were completed and the capture duration was 12.17 (+0.29/-0.27) years; both these numbers rank 147P as third among long TSC/orbiter events, behind SL9 and 111P. This study also confirms the importance of the QHC region as a dynamical route into and out of Jovian TSC, via the Hill's sphere.