• We present near-IR spectroscopy of 22 luminous low-ionization broad absorption line quasars (LoBAL QSOs) at redshift 1.3<z<2.5, with 12 objects at z~1.5 and 10 at z~2.3. The spectra cover the rest-frame H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ line regions, allowing us to obtain robust black hole mass estimates based on the broad H$\alpha$ line. We use these data, augmented by a lower redshift sample from the SDSS, to test the proposed youth scenario for LoBALs, which suggests LoBALs to constitute an early short lived evolutionary stage of quasar activity, by probing for any difference in their masses, Eddington ratios or rest-frame optical spectroscopic properties compared to normal quasars. In addition we construct the UV to mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SED) for the LoBAL sample and a matched non-BAL quasar sample. We do not find any statistically significant difference between LoBAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs in their black hole mass or Eddington ratio distributions. The mean UV to mid-IR SED of the LoBAL QSOs is consistent with non-BAL QSOs, apart from their stronger reddening. At z>1 there is no clear difference in their optical emission line properties. We do not see particularly weak [OIII] nor strong FeII emission. The LoBAL QSOs do not show a stronger prevalence of ionized gas outflows as traced by the [OIII] line, compared to normal QSOs of similar luminosity. We conclude that the optical-MIR properties of LoBAL QSOs are consistent with the general quasar population and do not support them to constitute a special phase of AGN evolution.
  • We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the redshift range 1.0<z<2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/FMOS near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find that a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z~2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the "AGN cosmic downsizing" phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the co-moving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, it might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes that luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less massive black holes with efficient accretion.
  • We present an analysis of broad emission lines observed in moderate-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs), typical of those found in X-ray surveys of deep fields, with the aim to test the validity of single-epoch virial black hole mass estimates. We have acquired near-infrared (NIR) spectra of AGNs up to z ~ 1.8 in the COSMOS and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey, with the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope. These low-resolution NIR spectra provide a significant detection of the broad Halpha line that has been shown to be a reliable probe of black hole mass at low redshift. Our sample has existing optical spectroscopy which provides a detection of MgII, a broad emission line typically used for black hole mass estimation at z > 1. We carry out a spectral-line fitting procedure using both Halpha and MgII to determine the virial velocity of gas in the broad line region, the monochromatic continuum luminosity at 3000 A, and the total Halpha line luminosity. With a sample of 43 AGNs spanning a range of two decades in luminosity (i.e., L ~ 10^44-46 ergs/s), we find a tight correlation between the continuum and line luminosity with a distribution characterized by <log(L_3000/L_Halpha)> = 1.52 and a dispersion sigma = 0.16. There is also a close one-to-one relationship between the FWHM of Halpha and of MgII up to 10000 km/s with a dispersion of 0.14 in the distribution of the logarithm of their ratios. Both of these then lead to there being very good agreement between Halpha- and MgII-based masses over a wide range in black hole mass (i.e., M_BH ~ 10^7-9 M_sun). We do find a small offset in MgII-based masses, relative to those based on Halpha, of +0.17 dex and a dispersion sigma = 0.32. In general, these results demonstrate that local scaling relations, using MgII or Halpha, are applicable for AGN at moderate luminosities and up to z ~ 2.
  • We present results from a study to determine whether relations, established in the local Universe, between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies are in place at higher redshifts. We establish a well-constructed sample of 18 X-ray-selected, broad-line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South - Survey with 0.5 < z < 1.2. This redshift range is chosen to ensure that HST imaging is available with at least two filters that bracket the 4000 Angstrom break thus providing reliable stellar mass estimates of the host galaxy by accounting for both young and old stellar populations. We compute single-epoch, virial black hole masses from optical spectra using the broad MgII emission line. For essentially all galaxies in our sample, their total stellar mass content agrees remarkably well, given their BH masses, with local relations of inactive galaxies and active SMBHs. We further decompose the total stellar mass into bulge and disk components separately with full knowledge of the HST point-spread-function. We find that ~80% of the sample is consistent with the local M_BH - M_Bulge relation even with 72% of the host galaxies showing the presence of a disk. In particular, bulge dominated hosts are more aligned with the local relation than those with prominent disks. We further discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are capable building up the stellar mass of the bulge from an extended disk of stars over the subsequent eight Gyrs.