• Inference over tails is performed by applying only the results of extreme value theory. Whilst such theory is well defined and flexible enough in the univariate case, multivariate inferential methods often require the imposition of arbitrary constraints not fully justifed by the underlying theory. In contrast, our approach uses only the constraints imposed by theory. We build on previous, theoretically justified work for marginal exceedances over a high, unknown threshold, by combining it with flexible, semiparametric copulae specifications to investigate extreme dependence. Whilst giving probabilistic judgements about the extreme regime of all marginal variables, our approach formally uses the full dataset and allows for a variety of patterns of dependence, be them extremal or not. A new probabilistic criterion quantifying the possibility that the data exhibits asymptotic independence is introduced and its robustness empirically studied. Estimation of functions of interest in extreme value analyses is performed via MCMC algorithms. Attention is also devoted to the prediction of new extreme observations. Our approach is evaluated through a series of simulations, applied to real data sets and assessed against competing approaches. Evidence demonstrates that the bulk of the data does not bias and improves the inferential process for the extremal dependence.
  • Current decision support systems address domains that are heterogeneous in nature and becoming progressively larger. Such systems often require the input of expert judgement about a variety of different fields and an intensive computational power to produce the scores necessary to rank the available policies. Recently, integrating decision support systems have been introduced to enable a formal Bayesian multi-agent decision analysis to be distributed and consequently efficient. In such systems, where different panels of experts oversee disjoint but correlated vectors of variables, each expert group needs to deliver only certain summaries of the variables under their jurisdiction to properly derive an overall score for the available policies. Here we present an algebraic approach that makes this methodology feasible for a wide range of modelling contexts and that enables us to identify the summaries needed for such a combination of judgements. We are also able to demonstrate that coherence, in a sense we formalize here, is still guaranteed when panels only share a partial specification of their model with other panel members. We illustrate this algebraic approach by applying it to a specific class of Bayesian networks and demonstrate how we can use it to derive closed form formulae for the computations of the joint moments of variables that determine the score of different policies.
  • Influence diagrams provide a compact graphical representation of decision problems. Several algorithms for the quick computation of their associated expected utilities are available in the literature. However, often they rely on a full quantification of both probabilistic uncertainties and utility values. For problems where all random variables and decision spaces are finite and discrete, here we develop a symbolic way to calculate the expected utilities of influence diagrams that does not require a full numerical representation. Within this approach expected utilities correspond to families of polynomials. After characterizing their polynomial structure, we develop an efficient symbolic algorithm for the propagation of expected utilities through the diagram and provide an implementation of this algorithm using a computer algebra system. We then characterize many of the standard manipulations of influence diagrams as transformations of polynomials. We also generalize the decision analytic framework of these diagrams by defining asymmetries as operations over the expected utility polynomials.
  • A variety of statistical graphical models have been defined to represent the conditional independences underlying a random vector of interest. Similarly, many different graphs embedding various types of preferential independences, as for example conditional utility independence and generalized additive independence, have more recently started to appear. In this paper we define a new graphical model, called a directed expected utility network, whose edges depict both probabilistic and utility conditional independences. These embed a very flexible class of utility models, much larger than those usually conceived in standard influence diagrams. Our graphical representation, and various transformations of the original graph into a tree structure, are then used to guide fast routines for the computation of a decision problem's expected utilities. We show that our routines generalize those usually utilized in standard influence diagrams' evaluations under much more restrictive conditions. We then proceed with the construction of a directed expected utility network to support decision makers in the domain of household food security.
  • Sensitivity methods for the analysis of the outputs of discrete Bayesian networks have been extensively studied and implemented in different software packages. These methods usually focus on the study of sensitivity functions and on the impact of a parameter change to the Chan-Darwiche distance. Although not fully recognized, the majority of these results heavily rely on the multilinear structure of atomic probabilities in terms of the conditional probability parameters associated with this type of network. By defining a statistical model through the polynomial expression of its associated defining conditional probabilities, we develop a unifying approach to sensitivity methods applicable to a large suite of models including extensions of Bayesian networks, for instance context-specific and dynamic ones, and chain event graphs. By then focusing on models whose defining polynomial is multilinear, our algebraic approach enables us to prove that the Chan-Darwiche distance is minimized for a certain class of multi-parameter contemporaneous variations when parameters are proportionally covaried.
  • A subjective expected utility policy making centre, managing complex, dynamic systems, needs to draw on the expertise of a variety of disparate panels of experts and integrate this information coherently. To achieve this, diverse supporting probabilistic models need to be networked together, the output of one model providing the input to the next. In this paper we provide a technology for designing an integrating decision support system and to enable the centre to explore and compare the efficiency of different candidate policies. We develop a formal statistical methodology to underpin this tool. In particular, we derive sufficient conditions that ensure inference remains coherent before and after relevant evidence is accommodated into the system. The methodology is illustrated throughout using examples drawn from two decision support systems: one designed for nuclear emergency crisis management and the other to support policy makers in addressing the complex challenges of food poverty in the UK.