• We conducted a survey of seven magnetic O and eleven B-type stars with masses above $8M_{\odot}$ using the Very Large Array in the 1cm, 3cm and 13cm bands. The survey resulted in a detection of two O and two B-type stars. While the detected O-type stars - HD 37742 and HD 47129 - are in binary systems, the detected B-type stars, HD 156424 and ALS 9522, are not known to be in binaries. All four stars were detected at 3cm, whereas three were detected at 1cm and only one star was detected at 13cm. The detected B-type stars are significantly more radio luminous than the non-detected ones, which is not the case for O-type stars. The non-detections at 13cm are interpreted as due to thermal free-free absorption. Mass-loss rates were estimated using 3cm flux densities and were compared with theoretical mass-loss rates, which assume free-free emission. For HD 37742, the two values of the mass-loss rates were in good agreement, possibly suggesting that the radio emission for this star is mainly thermal. For the other three stars, the estimated mass-loss rates from radio observations were much higher than those expected from theory, suggesting either a possible contribution from non- thermal emission from the magnetic star or thermal or non-thermal emission due to interacting winds of the binary system, especially for HD 47129. All the detected stars are predicted to host centrifugal magnetospheres except HD 37742, which is likely to host a dynamical magnetosphere. This suggests that non-thermal radio emission is favoured in stars with centrifugal magnetospheres.
  • We present results from the first attempts to derive various physical characteristics of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a based on a multi-wavelength view of its observational properties. This is done on the basis of new optical and near-infrared spectral observations and on data from various archives in the optical, radio and X-rays. The optical spectrum of WR 48a is acceptably well represented by a sum of two spectra: of a WR star of the WC8 type and of a WR star of the WN8h type. The strength of the interstellar absorption features in the optical spectra of WR 48a and the near-by stars D2-3 and D2-7 (both members of the open cluster Danks 2) indicates that WR 48a is located at a distance of ~4 kpc from us. WR 48a is very likely a thermal radio source and for such a case and smooth (no clumps) wind its radio emission suggests a relatively high mass-loss rate of this dusty WR star (dM/dt = a few x 10^(-4) solar masses per year). Long timescale (years) variability of WR 48a is established in the optical, radio and X-rays. Colliding stellar winds likely play a very important role in the physics of this object. However, some LBV-like (luminous blue variable) activity could not be excluded as well.
  • We present results of a Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR48a. These are the first high-resolution spectra of this object in X-rays. Blue-shifted centroids of the spectral lines of about -360 km/s and line widths of 1000 - 1500 km/s (FWHM) were deduced from the analysis of the line profiles of strong emission lines. The forbidden line of Si XIII is strong and not suppressed, indicating that the rarefied 10-30 MK plasma forms far from strong sources of far-UV emission, most likely in a wind collision zone. Global spectral modeling showed that the X-ray spectrum of WR48a suffered higher absorption in the October 2012 Chandra observation compared to a previous January 2008 XMM-Newton observation. The emission measure of the hot plasma in WR48a decreased by a factor ~ 3 over the same period of time. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the analysis of the available X-ray data is that of colliding stellar winds in a wide binary system with an elliptical orbit. We propose that the unseen secondary star in the system is another WR star or perhaps a luminous blue variable.
  • We have compiled a list of 36 O+O and 89 Wolf-Rayet binary candidates in the Milky Way and Magellanic clouds detected with the Chandra, XMM-Newton and ROSAT satellites to probe the connection between their X-ray properties and their system characteristics. Of the WR binaries with published parameters, all but two have kT > 0.9 keV. The most X-ray luminous WR binaries are typically very long period systems. The WR binaries show a nearly four-order of magnitude spread in X-ray luminosity, even among among systems with very similar WR primaries. Among the O+O binaries, short-period systems generally have soft X-ray spectra and longer period systems show harder X-ray spectra, again with a large spread in LX/Lbol.
  • We report on a sequence of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the TW Hydrae brown dwarf (BD) 2MASSW J1139511-315921 (2M1139). In the combined 31 ks ACIS-S exposure, 2M1139 is detected at the 3-sigma confidence level. We find an X-ray luminosity of L_X = 1.4^(+2.7)_(-1.0) x 10^26 ergs s^-1 or log(L_X/L_bol) = -4.8 +/- 0.3. This object is similar to another TW Hydrae BD member, CD-33 7795B (TWA 5B): both have H-alpha emission, both show no signatures of accretion, and both have comparable ages and spectral types. TWA 5B was previously detected in X-rays with a luminosity of L_X = 4 x 10^27 ergs s^-1 or log(L_X/L_bol) = -3.4, an order of magnitude more luminous in X-rays than 2M1139. We find that the discrepancy between the X-ray luminosity of 2M1139 and TWA 5B is consistent with the spread in X-ray luminosity in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) for BDs of similar spectral types. Though rotation may play a role in the X-ray activity of ultracool dwarfs like 2M1139 and TWA 5B, the discrepancy cannot be explained by rotation alone. We also examine two X-ray bright objects in the FOV of our Chandra observations and find one to be of spectral type K0IV and identify it as a possible RS Canum Venaticorum (RS CVn), and another X-ray bright object whose light-curve clearly shows the decay phase of an X-ray flare.
  • We have developed lists of likely B3--A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of Eta Car, an appropriate V and B-V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B-V) =0.55 mag +/- 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 Msun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results, and probe new parameter space of low mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 Msun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the Initial Mass Function.
  • The Chandra Carina Complex contains 200 known O- and B type stars. The Chandra survey detected 68 of the 70 O stars and 61 of 127 known B0-B3 stars. We have assembled a publicly available optical/X-ray database to identify OB stars that depart from the canonical Lx/Lbol relation, or whose average X-ray temperatures exceed 1 keV. Among the single O stars with high kT we identify two candidate magnetically confined wind shock sources: Tr16-22, O8.5 V, and LS 1865, O8.5 V((f)). The O4 III(fc) star HD 93250 exhibits strong, hard, variable X-rays, suggesting it may be a massive binary with a period of >30 days. The visual O2 If* binary HD 93129A shows soft 0.6 keV and hard 1.9 keV emission components, suggesting embedded wind shocks close to the O2 If* Aa primary, and colliding wind shocks between Aa and Ab. Of the 11 known O-type spectroscopic binaries, the long orbital-period systems HD 93343, HD 93403 and QZ Car have higher shock temperatures than short-period systems such as HD 93205 and FO 15. Although the X-rays from most B stars may be produced in the coronae of unseen, low-mass pre-main-sequence companions, a dozen B stars with high Lx cannot be explained by a distribution of unseen companions. One of these, SS73 24 in the Treasure Chest cluster, is a new candidate Herbig Be star.
  • We present a 1.42 square degree mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.
  • We report the results of a new survey of massive, OB stars throughout the Carina Nebula using the X-ray point source catalog provided by the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) in conjunction with infrared (IR) photometry from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and the Spitzer Space Telescope Vela--Carina survey. Mid-IR photometry is relatively unaffected by extinction, hence it provides strong constraints on the luminosities of OB stars, assuming that their association with the Carina Nebula, and hence their distance, is confirmed. We fit model stellar atmospheres to the optical (UBV) and IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 182 OB stars with known spectral types and measure the bolometric luminosity and extinction for each star. We find that the extinction law measured toward the OB stars has two components: Av=1--1.5 mag produced by foreground dust with a ratio of total-to-selective absorption Rv=3.1 plus a contribution from local dust with Rv>4.0 in the Carina molecular clouds that increases as Av increases. Using X-ray emission as a strong indicator of association with Carina, we identify 94 candidate OB stars with Lbol\geq10^4 Lsun by fitting their IR SEDs. If the candidate OB stars are eventually confirmed by follow-up spectroscopic observations, the number of cataloged OB stars in the Carina Nebula will increase by ~50%. Correcting for incompleteness due to OB stars falling below the Lbol cutoff or the CCCP detection limit, these results potentially double the size of the young massive stellar population.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • We present XMM-Newton observations of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a. This is the first detection of this object in X-rays. The XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are heavily absorbed and the presence of numerous strong emission lines indicates a thermal origin of the WR 48a X-ray emission, with dominant temperature components at kT_cool approx. 1 keV and kT_hot approx. 3~keV, the hotter component dominating the observed flux. No significant X-ray variability was detected on time scales < 1 day. Although the distance to WR 48a is uncertain, if it is physically associated with the open clusters Danks 1 and 2 at d ~ 4 kpc, then the resultant X-ray luminosity L_X ~ 10^(35) ergs/s makes it the most X-ray luminous Wolf-Rayet star in the Galaxy detected so far, after the black-hole candidate Cyg X-3. We assume the following scenarios as the most likely explanation for the X-ray properties of WR 48a: (1) colliding stellar winds in a wide WR+O binary system, or in a hierarchical triple system with non-degenerate stellar components; (2) accretion shocks from the WR 48a wind onto a close companion (possibly a neutron star). More specific information about WR48a and its wind properties will be needed to distinguish between the above possibilities.
  • We present a method for computing the net transmission of X-rays emitted by shock-heated plasma distributed throughout a partially optically thick stellar wind from a massive star. We find the transmission by an exact integration of the formal solution, assuming that the emitting plasma and absorbing plasma are mixed at a constant mass ratio above some minimum radius, below which there is assumed to be no emission. This model is more realistic than either the slab absorption associated with a corona at the base of the wind or the exospheric approximation that assumes that all observed X-rays are emitted without attenuation from above the radius of optical depth unity. Our model is implemented in XSPEC as a pre-calculated table that can be coupled to a user-defined table of the wavelength dependent wind opacity. We provide a default wind opacity model that is more representative of real wind opacities than the commonly used neutral interstellar medium (ISM) tabulation. Preliminary modeling of \textit{Chandra} grating data indicates that the X-ray hardness trend of OB stars with spectral subtype can largely be understood as a wind absorption effect.
  • A review of star formation in the Rho Ophiuchi molecular complex is presented, with particular emphasis on studies of the main cloud, L1688, since 1991. Recent photometric and parallax measurements of stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB association suggest a distance for the cloud between 120 and 140 parsecs. Star formation is ongoing in the dense cores of L1688 with a median age for young stellar objects of 0.3 Myr. The surface population appears to have a median age of 2-5 Myr and merges with low mass stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup. Making use of the most recent X-ray and infrared photometric surveys and spectroscopic surveys of L1688, we compile a list of over 300 association members with counterparts in the 2MASS catalog. Membership criteria, such as lithium absorption, X-ray emission, and infrared excess, cover the full range of evolutionary states for young stellar objects. Spectral energy distributions are classified for many association members using infrared photometry obtained from the Spitzer Space Telescope.
  • We present and analyze the first high-resolution X-ray images ever obtained of the Eagle Nebula star-forming region. On 2001 July 30 the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained a 78 ks image of the Eagle Nebula (M 16) that includes the core of the young galactic cluster NGC 6611 and the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas in M 16 known as the Pillars of Creation. We find a total of 1101 X-ray sources in the 17'x17' ACIS-I field of view. Most of the X-ray sources are low mass pre-main-sequence or high-mass main-sequence stars in this young cluster. A handful of hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in high-resolution near-infrared images recently obtained with the VLT (McCaughrean & Andersen 2002). In this paper, we focus on the 40 X-ray sources in and around Pillars 1-4 at the heart of the Eagle Nebula. None of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester et al. (1996) in HST WFPC2 images of M 16, implying that either the EGGs do not contain protostars or that the protostars have not yet become X-ray active. Eight X-ray counts are coincident with the Herbig-Haro object HH216, implying log L_X~30.0.
  • We report on four Chandra grating observations of the oblique magnetic rotator theta^1 Ori C (O5.5 V) covering a wide range of viewing angles with respect to the star's 1060 G dipole magnetic field. We employ line-width and centroid analyses to study the dynamics of the X-ray emitting plasma in the circumstellar environment, as well as line-ratio diagnostics to constrain the spatial location, and global spectral modeling to constrain the temperature distribution and abundances of the very hot plasma. We investigate these diagnostics as a function of viewing angle and analyze them in conjunction with new MHD simulations of the magnetically channeled wind shock mechanism on theta^1 Ori C. This model fits all the data surprisingly well, predicting the temperature, luminosity, and occultation of the X-ray emitting plasma with rotation phase.
  • We discuss three different observational diagnostics related to disks around hot stars: absorption line determinations of rotational velocities of Be stars; polarization diagnostics of circumstellar disks; and X-ray line diagnostics of one specific magnetized hot star, $\theta^1$ Ori C. Some common themes that emerge from these studies include (a) the benefits of having a specific physical model as a framework for interpreting diagnostic data; (b) the importance of combining several different types of observational diagnostics of the same objects; and (c) that while there is often the need to reinterpret traditional diagnostics in light of new theoretical advances, there are many new and powerful diagnostics that are, or will soon be, available for the study of disks around hot stars.
  • A 96-ks Chandra X-ray observation of rho Ophiuchus cloud core A detected 87 sources, of which 60 were identified with counterparts at other wavelengths. The X-ray detections include 12 of 14 known classical T Tauri stars in the field, 15 of 17 known weak-lined TTS, and 4 of 15 brown dwarf candidates. The X-ray detections are characterized by hard, heavily absorbed emission. The mean photon energy of a typical source is 3 keV, and more than half of the detections are variable. Prominent X-ray flares were detected in the unusual close binary system Oph S1, the X-ray bright WTTS DoAr 21, and the brown dwarf candidate GY 31. Time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the DoAr~21 flare clearly reveals a sequence of secondary flares during the decay phase which may have reheated the plasma. We find that the X-ray luminosity distributions and spectral hardnesses of CTTS and WTTS are similar. We also conclude that the X-ray emission of detected brown-dwarf candidates is less luminous than T Tauri stars, but spectroscopically similar. Simultaneous multifrequency VLA observations detected 31 radio sources at 6 cm, of which ten were also detected by Chandra. We report new radio detections of the optically invisible IR source WLY 2-11 and the faint H-alpha emission line star Elias 24. We confirm circular polarization in Oph S1 and report a new detection of circular polarization in DoAr 21. We find no evidence that X-ray and radio luminosities are correlated in the small sample of TTS detected simultaneously with Chandra and the VLA. We describe a new non-parametric method for estimating X-ray spectral properties from unbinned photon event.
  • We present the analysis of a 38.4 ks and a 23.6 ks observation of the core of the Pleiades open cluster. The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory detected 99 X-ray sources in a 17'X17' region, including 18 of 23 Pleiades members. Five candidate Pleiades members have also been detected, confirming their cluster membership. Fifty-seven sources have no optical or near-infrared counterparts to limiting magnitudes V=22.5 and J=14.5. The unidentified X-ray sources are probably background AGN and not stars. The Chandra field of view contains seven intermediate mass cluster members. Five of these, HII 980 (B6 + G), HII 956 (A7 + F6), HII 1284 (A9 + K), HII 1338 (F3 + F6), and HII 1122 (F4 + K), are detected in this study. All but HII 1284 have high X-ray luminosity and soft X-ray spectra. HII 1284 has X-ray properties comparable to non-flaring K-type stars. Since all five stars are visual or spectroscopic binaries with X-ray properties similar to F-G stars, the late-type binary companions are probably producing the observed coronal X-ray emission. Strengthening this conclusion is the nondetection by Chandra of two A stars, HII 1362 (A7, no known companion) and HII 1375 (A0 + A SB) with X-ray luminosity upper limits 27-54 times smaller than HII 980 and HII 956, the B6-A7 stars with cooler companions. Despite the low number statistics, the Chandra data appear to confirm the expectation that late-B and A stars are not strong intrinsic X-ray sources. The ACIS spectra and hardness ratios suggest a gradual increase in coronal temperature with decreasing mass from F4 to K. M stars appear to have somewhat cooler coronae than active K stars.
  • High-resolution X-ray spectra of high-mass stars and low-mass T-Tauri stars obtained during the first year of the Chandra mission are providing important clues about the mechanisms which produce X-rays on very young stars. For zeta Puppis (O4 If) and zeta Ori (O9.5 I), the broad, blue-shifted line profiles, line ratios, and derived temperature distribution suggest that the X-rays are produced throughout the wind via instability-driven wind shocks. For some less luminous OB stars, like theta^1 Ori C (O7 V) and tau Sco (B0 V), the line profiles are symmetric and narrower. The presence of time-variable emission and very high-temperature lines in theta^1 Ori C and tau Sco suggest that magnetically confined wind shocks may be at work. The grating spectrum of the classical T-Tauri star TW Hya is remarkable because the forbidden-line emission of He-like Ne IX and O VII is very weak, implying that the X-ray emitting region is very dense, n = 6E+12 cgs, or that the X-rays are produced very close to the ultraviolet hotspot at the base of an accretion funnel. ACIS light curves and spectra of flares and low-mass and high-mass young stellar objects in Orion and rho Ophiuchus further suggest that extreme magnetic activity is a general property of many very young stars.
  • We present Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer spectroscopy and photometry of the nearby F8 V star HD 35850 (HR 1817). The EUVE spectra reveal 28 emission lines from Fe IX and Fe XV to Fe XXIV. The Fe XXI 102, 129 A ratio yields an upper limit for the coronal electron density, log n < 11.6 per cc. The EUVE SW spectrum shows a small but clearly detectable continuum. The line-to-continuum ratio indicates approximately solar Fe abundances, 0.8 < Z < 1.6. The resulting emission-measure distribution is characterized by two temperature components at log T of 6.8 and 7.4. The EUVE spectra have been compared with non-simultaneous ASCA SIS spectra of HD 35850. The SIS spectrum shows the same temperature distribution as the EUVE DEM analysis. However, the SIS spectral firs suggest sub-solar abundances, 0.34 < Z < 0.81. Although some of the discrepancy may be the result of incomplete X-ray line lists, we cannot explain the disagreement between the EUVE line-to-continuum ratio and the ASCA-derived Fe abundance. Given its youth (t ~ 100 Myr), its rapid rotation (v sin i ~ 50 km/s), and its high X-ray activity (Lx ~ 1.5E+30 ergs/s), HD 35850 may represent an activity extremum for single, main-sequence F-type stars. The variability and EM distribution can be reconstructed using the continuous flaring model of Guedel provided that the flare distribution has a power-law index of 1.8. Similar results obtained for other young solar analogs suggest that continuous flaring is a viable coronal heating mechanism on rapidly rotating, late-type, main-sequence stars.
  • We report the discovery of large-amplitude, periodic X-ray emission from the O7 V star theta^1 Orionis C, the central star of the Orion Nebula. Ten ROSAT HRI snapshots of the Trapezium cluster taken over the course of 21 days show that the count rate of theta^1 Ori C varies from 0.26 to 0.41 counts/s with a clear 15-day period. The soft X-ray variations have the same phase and period as H-alpha and He II 4686 variations reported by Stahl et al., and are in anti-phase with the C IV and Si IV ultraviolet absorption features. We consider five mechanisms which might explain the amplitude, phase, and periodicity of the X-ray variations: (1) colliding-wind emission with an unseen binary companion, (2) coronal emission from an unseen late-type pre-main--sequence star, (3) periodic density fluctuations, (4) absorption of magnetospheric X-rays in a corotating wind, and (5) magnetosphere eclipses. The ROSAT data rule out the first three scenarios, but cannot rule out either of the latter two which require the presence of an extended magnetosphere, consistent with the suggestion of Stahl et al. that theta^1 Ori C is an oblique magnetic rotator. As such, theta^1 Ori C may be the best example of a high-mass analog to the chemically peculiar, magnetic Bp stars.