• Understanding how bulges grow in galaxies is critical step towards unveiling the link between galaxy morphology and star-formation. To do so, it is necessary to decompose large sample of galaxies at different epochs into their main components (bulges and disks). This is particularly challenging, especially at high redshifts, where galaxies are poorly resolved. This work presents a catalog of bulge-disk decompositions of the surface brightness profiles of ~17.600 H-band selected galaxies in the CANDELS fields (F160W<23, 0<z<2) in 4 to 7 filters covering a spectral range of 430-1600nm. This is the largest available catalog of this kind up to z = 2. By using a novel approach based on deep-learning to select the best model to fit, we manage to control systematics arising from wrong model selection and obtain less contaminated samples than previous works. We show that the derived structural properties are within $\sim10-20\%$ of random uncertainties. We then fit stellar population models to the decomposed SEDs (Spectral Energy Distribution) of bulges and disks and derive stellar masses (and stellar mass bulge-to-total ratios) as well as rest-frame colors (U,V,J) for bulges and disks separately. All data products are publicly released with this paper and through the web page https://lerma.obspm.fr/huertas/form_CANDELS and will be used for scientific analysis in forthcoming works.
  • Large scale imaging surveys will increase the number of galaxy-scale strong lensing candidates by maybe three orders of magnitudes beyond the number known today. Finding these rare objects will require picking them out of at least tens of millions of images and deriving scientific results from them will require quantifying the efficiency and bias of any search method. To achieve these objectives automated methods must be developed. Because gravitational lenses are rare objects reducing false positives will be particularly important. We present a description and results of an open gravitational lens finding challenge. Participants were asked to classify 100,000 candidate objects as to whether they were gravitational lenses or not with the goal of developing better automated methods for finding lenses in large data sets. A variety of methods were used including visual inspection, arc and ring finders, support vector machines (SVM) and convolutional neural networks (CNN). We find that many of the methods will be easily fast enough to analyse the anticipated data flow. In test data, several methods are able to identify upwards of half the lenses after applying some thresholds on the lens characteristics such as lensed image brightness, size or contrast with the lens galaxy without making a single false-positive identification. This is significantly better than direct inspection by humans was able to do. (abridged)
  • We analyze the properties of a multiply-imaged Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitter at z=5.75 identified through SHARDS Frontier Fields intermediate-band imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) cluster Abell 370. The source, A370-L57, has low intrinsic luminosity (M_UV~-16.5), steep UV spectral index (\beta=-2.4+/-0.1), and extreme rest-frame equivalent width of Lya (EW(Lya)=420+180-120 \AA). Two different gravitational lens models predict high magnification (\mu~10--16) for the two detected counter-images, separated by 7", while a predicted third counter-image (\mu~3--4) is undetected. We find differences of ~50% in magnification between the two lens models, quantifying our current systematic uncertainties. Integral field spectroscopy of A370-L57 with MUSE shows a narrow (FWHM=204+/-10 km/s) and asymmetric Lya profile with an integrated luminosity L(Lya)~10^42 erg/s. The morphology in the HST bands comprises a compact clump (r_e<100 pc) that dominates the Lya and continuum emission and several fainter clumps at projected distances <1 kpc that coincide with an extension of the Lya emission in the SHARDS F823W17 and MUSE observations. The latter could be part of the same galaxy or an interacting companion. We find no evidence of contribution from AGN to the Lya emission. Fitting of the spectral energy distribution with stellar population models favors a very young (t<10 Myr), low mass (M*~10^6.5 Msun), and metal poor (Z<4x10^-3) stellar population. Its modest star formation rate (SFR~1.0 Msun/yr) implies high specific SFR (sSFR~2.5x10^-7 yr^-1) and SFR density (Sigma_SFR ~ 7-35 Msun/yr/kpc^2). The properties of A370-L57 make it a good representative of the population of galaxies responsible for cosmic reionization.
  • We build a background cluster candidate catalog from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, using our detection algorithm RedGOLD. The NGVS covers 104$deg^2$ of the Virgo cluster in the $u^*,g,r,i,z$-bandpasses to a depth of $ g \sim 25.7$~mag (5$\sigma$). Part of the survey was not covered or has shallow observations in the $r$--band. We build two cluster catalogs: one using all bandpasses, for the fields with deep $r$--band observations ($\sim 20 \ deg^2$), and the other using four bandpasses ($u^*,g,i,z$) for the entire NGVS area. Based on our previous CFHT-LS W1 studies, we estimate that both of our catalogs are $\sim100\%$($\sim70\%$) complete and $\sim80\%$ pure, at $z\le 0.6$($z\lesssim1$), for galaxy clusters with masses of $M\gtrsim10^{14}\ M_{\odot}$. We show that when using four bandpasses, though the photometric redshift accuracy is lower, RedGOLD detects massive galaxy clusters up to $z\sim 1$ with completeness and purity similar to the five-band case. This is achieved when taking into account the bias in the richness estimation, which is $\sim40\%$ lower at $0.5\le z<0.6$ and $\sim20\%$ higher at $0.6<z< 0.8$, with respect to the five-band case. RedGOLD recovers all the X-ray clusters in the area with mass $M_{500} > 1.4 \times 10^{14} \rm M_{\odot}$ and $0.08<z<0.5$. Because of our different cluster richness limits and the NGVS depth, our catalogs reach to lower masses than the published redMaPPer cluster catalog over the area, and we recover $\sim 90-100\%$ of its detections.
  • We set out to quantify the number density of quiescent massive compact galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We determine structural parameters based on i-band imaging using the CFHT equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 (CS82) survey (~170 sq. degrees) taking advantage of an exquisite median seeing of ~0.6''. We select compact massive (M > 5x10^10 M_sun) galaxies within the redshift range of 0.2<z<0.6. The large volume sampled allows to decrease the effect of cosmic variance that has hampered the calculation of the number density for this enigmatic population in many previous studies. We undertake an exhaustive analysis in an effort to untangle the various findings inherent to the diverse definition of compactness present in the literature. We find that the absolute number of compact galaxies is very dependent on the adopted definition and can change up to a factor of >10. We systematically measure a factor of ~5 more compacts at the same redshift than what was previously reported on smaller fields with HST imaging, which are more affected by cosmic variance. This means that the decrease in number density from z ~ 1.5 to z ~ 0.2 might be only of a factor of ~2-5, significantly smaller than what previously reported. This supports progenitor bias as the main contributor to the size evolution. This milder decrease is roughly compatible with the predictions from recent numerical simulations. Only the most extreme compact galaxies, with Reff < 1.5x( M/10^11 M_sun)^0.75 and M > 10^10.7 M_sun, appear to drop in number by a factor of ~20 and hence likely experience a noticeable size evolution.
  • In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at intermediate redshifts (z~1). We combine the ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric data from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS) with deep UV-to-FIR observations in the GOODS-N field. Exploiting two of the 25 SHARDS medium-band filters, F687W17 and F823W17, we select [OII] emission line galaxies at z~0.84 and z~1.23 and characterize their physical properties. Their rest-frame equivalent widths (EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII])), line fluxes, luminosities, star formation rates (SFRs) and dust attenuation properties are investigated. The evolution of the EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII]) closely follows the SFR density evolution of the universe, with a trend of EW$_{\mathrm{rf}}$([OII])$\propto$(1+z)$^3$ up to redshift z~1, followed by a possible flattening. The SF properties of the galaxies selected on the basis of their [OII] emission are compared with complementary samples of SFGs selected by their MIR and FIR emission, and also with a general mass-selected sample of galaxies at the same redshifts. We demonstrate observationally that the UVJ diagram (or, similarly, a cut in the specific SFR) is only partially able to distinguish the quiescent galaxies from the SFGs. The SFR-M$_*$ relation is investigated for the different samples, yelding a logarithmic slope ~1, in good agreement with previous results. The dust attenuations derived from different SFR indicators (UV(1600), UV(2800), [OII], IR) are compared and show clear trends with respect to both the stellar mass and total SFR, with more massive and highly star-forming galaxies being affected by stronger dust attenuation.
  • We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with $0.2<z<1.2$ selected in the 2.78 $deg^2$ ALHAMBRA Survey. The high precision of our photometric redshifts, close to $1\%$, and the wide spread of the seven ALHAMBRA pointings ensure that this catalogue has better mass sensitivity and is less affected by cosmic variance than comparable samples. The detection has been carried out with the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF), whose performance has been checked in ALHAMBRA-like light-cone mock catalogues. Great care has been taken to ensure that the observable properties of the mocks photometry accurately correspond to those of real catalogues. From our simulations, we expect to detect galaxy clusters and groups with both $70\%$ completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of $M_h\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$ for $z<0.85$. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with $\sim0.6\%$ precision for $z<1$. We also expect to measure cluster masses with $\sigma_{M_h|M^*_{CL}}\sim0.25-0.35\, dex$ precision down to $\sim3\times10^{13}\rm M_{\odot}$, masses which are $50\%$ smaller than those reached by similar work. We have compared these detections with previous optical, spectroscopic and X-rays work, finding an excellent agreement with the rates reported from the simulations. We have also explored the overall properties of these detections such as the presence of a colour-magnitude relation, the evolution of the photometric blue fraction and the clustering of these sources in the different ALHAMBRA fields. Despite the small numbers, we observe tentative evidence that, for a fixed stellar mass, the environment is playing a crucial role at lower redshifts (z$<$0.5).
  • [abridged] We quantify the morphological evolution of z~0 massive galaxies ($M*/M_\odot\sim10^{11}$) from z~3 in the 5 CANDELS fields. The progenitors are selected using abundance matching techniques to account for the mass growth. The morphologies strongly evolve from z~3. At z<1, the population matches the massive end of the Hubble sequence, with 30% of spheroids, 50% of galaxies with equally dominant disk and bulge components and 20% of disks. At z~2-3 there is a majority of irregular systems (~60-70%) with still 30% of spheroids. We then analyze the SFRs, gas fractions and structural properties for the different morphologies independently. Our results suggest two distinct channels for the growth of bulges in massive galaxies. Around 30-40% were already bulges at z~2.5, with low average SFRs and gas-fractions (10-15%), high Sersic indices (n>3-4) and small effective radii ($R_e$~1 kpc) pointing towards an early formation through gas-rich mergers or VDI. Between z~ 2.5 and z~0, they rapidly increase their size by a factor of ~4-5, become all passive but their global morphology remains unaltered. The structural evolution is independent of the gas fractions, suggesting that it is driven by ex-situ events. The remaining 60% experience a gradual morphological transformation, from clumpy disks to more regular bulge+disks systems, essentially happening at z>1. It results in the growth of a significant bulge component (n~3) for 2/3 of the systems possibly through the migration of clumps while the remaining 1/3 keeps a rather small bulge (n~1.5-2). The transition phase between disturbed and relaxed systems and the emergence of the bulge is correlated with a decrease of the star formation activity and the gas fractions. The growth of the effective radii scales roughly with $H(z)^{-1}$ and it is therefore consistent with the expected growth of disks in galaxy haloes.
  • We present the discovery of two galaxy overdensities in the Hubble Space Telescope UDF: a proto-cluster, HUDFJ0332.4-2746.6 at $z = 1.84 \pm 0.01$, and a group, HUDFJ0332.5-2747.3 at $z =1.90 \pm 0.01$. Assuming viralization, the velocity dispersion of HUDFJ0332.4-2746.6 implies a mass of $M_{200}= (2.2 \pm 1.8) \times 10^{14} M_{\odot}$, consistent with the lack of extended X-ray emission. Neither overdensity shows evidence of a red sequence. About $50\%$ of their members show interactions and/or disturbed morphologies, which are signatures of merger remnants or disk instability. Most of their ETGs have blue colors and show recent star-formation. These observations reveal for the first time large fractions of spectroscopically confirmed star-forming blue ETGs in proto-clusters at $z\approx 2$. These star-forming ETGs are most likely among the progenitors of the quiescent population in clusters at more recent epochs. Their mass-size relation is consistent with that of passive ETGs in clusters at $z\sim0.7-1.5$. If these galaxies are the progenitors of cluster ETGs at these lower redshifts, their size would evolve according to a similar mass-size relation. It is noteworthy that quiescent ETGs in clusters at $z=1.8-2$ also do not show any significant size evolution over this redshift range, contrary to field ETGs. The ETG fraction is $\lesssim 50\%$, compared to the typical quiescent ETG fraction of $\approx 80\%$ in cluster cores at $z< 1$. The fraction, masses, and colors of the newly discovered ETGs imply that other cluster ETGs will be formed/accreted at a later time.
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain debated. Several recent works support a relation in the local Universe steeper than previously thought. Based on the comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z~1, for stellar masses Mstar>2e11 Msun. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of \beta>0.35-0.70, instead of the usual \beta~0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent BOSS clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (< 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for Mstar>3e11 Msun, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z~1.
  • The early--type galaxy (ETG) mass--size relation has been largely studied to understand how these galaxies have assembled their mass. One key observational result of the last years is that massive galaxies increased their size by a factor of a few at fixed stellar mass from $z\sim2$. Hierarchical models favor minor mergers as a plausible driver of this size growth. Some of these models, predict a significant environmental dependence in the sense that galaxies residing in more massive halos tend to be larger than galaxies in lower mass halos, at fixed stellar mass and redshift. At present, observational results of this environmental dependence have been contradictory. In this paper we revisit this issue in the local Universe, by investigating how the sizes of massive ETGs depend on large-scale environment using an updated and accurate sample of ETGs in different environments - field, group, clusters - from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Our analysis does not show any significant environmental dependence of the sizes of central and satellites ETGs at fixed stellar mass at $z\sim0$. The size-mass relation of early-type galaxies at $z\sim0$ seems to be universal, i.e., independent of the mass of the host halo and of the position of the galaxy in that halo (central or satellite). The result is robust to different galaxy selections based on star formation, morphology or central density. In fact, considering our observational errors and the size of the sample, any size ratio larger than $30-40%$ between massive galaxies ($log(M_*/M_\odot)>11$) living in clusters and in the field can be ruled out at $3\sigma$ level.
  • [abridged] We study the dependence of the galaxy size evolution on morphology, stellar mass and large scale environment for a sample of 298 group and 384 field quiescent early-type galaxies from the COSMOS survey, selected from z~1 to the present, and with masses $log(M/M_\odot)>10.5$. The galaxy size growth depends on galaxy mass and early-type galaxy morphology, e.g., elliptical galaxies evolve differently than lenticular galaxies. At the low mass end -$10.5<Log(M/M_\odot)<11$, ellipticals do not show strong size growth from $z\sim1$ to the present (10% to 30% depending on the morphological classification). On the other end, massive ellipticals -log(M/M_\odot)>11.2$- approximately doubled their size. Interestingly, lenticular galaxies display different behavior: they appear more compact on average and they do show a size growth of \sim60% since z=1 independent of stellar mass. We compare our results with state-of-the art semi-analytic models. While major and minor mergers can account for most of the galaxy size growth, we find that with present data and the theoretical uncertainties in the modeling we cannot state clear evidence favoring either merger or mass loss via quasar and/or stellar winds as the primary mechanism driving the evolution. The galaxy mass--size relation and the size growth do not depend on environment in the halo mass range explored in this work (field to group mass $log(M_h/M_\odot)<14$), i.e., group and field galaxies follow the same trends, which is at variance with predictions from current hierarchical models that show a clear dependence of size growth on halo mass for massive ellipticals -$log(M_*/M_\odot)>11.2$.
  • We confirm the detection of 3 groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z~1.3, and give their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies as compared to the central clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453, selecting 89 galaxies in the clusters and 74 galaxies in the groups. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30% -40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g. based on Sersic index). In luminosity selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of Sa galaxies. The ETG fractions never rise above ~50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in clusters at z~1. However, ETG plus Sa fractions are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z~1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as Sas might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples, the ETG fraction show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations occur at lower masses and densities. The ETG mass-size relation shows evolution towards smaller sizes at higher redshift in both clusters and groups, while the late-type mass-size relation matches that observed locally. The group ETG red sequence shows lower zero points and larger scatters than in clusters, both expected to be an indication of a younger galaxy population. The estimated age difference is small when compared to the difference in age at different galaxy masses.
  • We present an automated morphological classification in 4 types (E,S0,Sab,Scd) of ~700.000 galaxies from the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic sample based on support vector machines. The main new property of the classification is that we associate to each galaxy a probability of being in the four morphological classes instead of assigning a single class. The classification is therefore better adapted to nature where we expect a continuos transition between different morphological types. The algorithm is trained with a visual classification and then compared to several independent visual classifications including the Galaxy Zoo first release catalog. We find a very good correlation between the automated classification and classical visual ones. The compiled catalog is intended for use in different applications and can be downloaded at http://gepicom04.obspm.fr/sdss_morphology/Morphology_2010.html and soon from the CasJobs database.