• The direct measurement of the top quark-Higgs coupling is one of the important questions in understanding the Higgs boson. The coupling can be obtained through measurement of the top quark pair-associated Higgs boson production cross-section. Of the multiple challenges arising in this cross-section measurement, we investigate the reconstruction of the partons originating from the hard scattering process using the measured jets in simulated ttH events. The task corresponds to an assignment challenge of m objects (jets) to n other objects (partons), where m>=n. We compare several methods with emphasis on a concept based on deep learning techniques which yields the best results with more than 50% of correct jet-parton assignments.
  • The Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) project defines a toolbox for accessing software via the web. It is based on latest web technologies and provides a powerful extension mechanism that enables to interface a wide range of applications. Beyond basic applications such as a code editor, a file browser, or a terminal, it meets the demands of sophisticated experiment-specific use cases that focus on physics data analyses and typically require a high degree of interactivity. As an example, we developed a data inspector that is capable of browsing interactively through event content of several data formats, e.g., "MiniAOD" which is utilized by the CMS collaboration. The VISPA extension mechanism can also be used to embed external web-based applications that benefit from dynamic allocation of user-defined computing resources via SSH. For example, by wrapping the "JSROOT" project, ROOT files located on any remote machine can be inspected directly through a VISPA server instance. We introduced domains that combine groups of users and role-based permissions. Thereby, tailored projects are enabled, e.g. for teaching where access to student's homework is restricted to a team of tutors, or for experiment-specific data that may only be accessible for members of the collaboration. We present the extension mechanism including corresponding applications and give an outlook onto the new permission system.
  • In high-energy particle physics, workflow management systems are primarily used as tailored solutions in dedicated areas such as Monte Carlo production. However, physicists performing data analyses are usually required to steer their individual workflows manually which is time-consuming and often leads to undocumented relations between particular workloads. We present a generic analysis design pattern that copes with the sophisticated demands of end-to-end HEP analyses and provides a make-like execution system. It is based on the open-source pipelining package Luigi which was developed at Spotify and enables the definition of arbitrary workloads, so-called Tasks, and the dependencies between them in a lightweight and scalable structure. Further features are multi-user support, automated dependency resolution and error handling, central scheduling, and status visualization in the web. In addition to already built-in features for remote jobs and file systems like Hadoop and HDFS, we added support for WLCG infrastructure such as LSF and CREAM job submission, as well as remote file access through the Grid File Access Library. Furthermore, we implemented automated resubmission functionality, software sandboxing, and a command line interface with auto-completion for a convenient working environment. For the implementation of a $t\bar{t}H$ cross section measurement, we created a generic Python interface that provides programmatic access to all external information such as datasets, physics processes, statistical models, and additional files and values. In summary, the setup enables the execution of the entire analysis in a parallelized and distributed fashion with a single command.
  • Bachelor physics lectures on particle physics and astrophysics were complemented by exercises related to data analysis and data interpretation at the RWTH Aachen University recently. The students performed these exercises using the internet platform VISPA, which provides a development environment for physics data analyses. We describe the platform and its application within the physics course, and present the results of a student survey. The students acceptance of the learning project was positive. The level of acceptance was related to their individual preference for learning with a computer. Furthermore, students with good programming skills favor working individually, while students who attribute themselves having low programming abilities favor working in teams. The students appreciated approaching actual research through the data analysis tasks.