• Future Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys aim at observing galaxy clustering over a wide range of redshift and galaxy populations at great precision, reaching tenths of a percent, in order to detect any deviation of dark energy from the $\LCDM$ model. We utilize a set of paired quasi-\Nb\, FastPM simulations that were designed to mitigate the sample variance effect on the BAO feature and evaluated the BAO systematics as precisely as $\sim 0.01\%$. We report anisotropic BAO scale shifts before and after density field reconstruction in the presence of redshift-space distortions over a wide range of redshift, galaxy/halo biases, and shot noise levels. We test different reconstruction schemes and different smoothing filter scales, and introduce physically-motivated BAO fitting models. For the first time, we derive a Galilean-invariant infrared resummed model for halos in real and redshift space. We test these models from the perspective of robust BAO measurements and non-BAO information such as growth rate and nonlinear bias. We find that pre-reconstruction BAO scale has moderate fitting-model dependence at the level of $0.1\%-0.2\%$ for matter while the dependence is substantially reduced to less than $0.07\%$ for halos. We find that post-reconstruction BAO shifts are generally reduced to below $0.1\%$ in the presence of galaxy/halo bias and show much smaller fitting model dependence. Different reconstruction conventions can potentially make a much larger difference on the line-of-sight BAO scale, upto $0.3\%$. Meanwhile, the precision (error) of the BAO measurements is quite consistent regardless of the choice of the fitting model or reconstruction convention.
  • As a major source of cosmological information, galaxy clustering is susceptible to long-wavelength density and tidal fluctuations. These long modes modulate the growth and expansion rate of local structures, shifting them in both amplitude and scale. These effects are often named the growth and dilation effects, respectively. In particular the dilation shifts the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak and breaks the assumption of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test. This cannot be removed with reconstruction techniques because the effect originates from long modes outside the survey. In redshift space, the long modes generate a large-scale radial peculiar velocity that affects the redshift-space distortion (RSD) signal. We compute the redshift-space response functions of the galaxy power spectrum to long density and tidal modes at leading order in perturbation theory, including both the growth and dilation terms. We validate these response functions against measurements from simulated galaxy mock catalogs. As one application, long density and tidal modes beyond the scale of a survey correlate various observables leading to an excess error known as the super-sample covariance, and thus weaken their constraining power. We quantify the super-sample effect on BAO, AP, and RSD measurements, and study its impact on current and future surveys.
  • Motivated by recent developments in perturbative calculations of the nonlinear evolution of large-scale structure, we present an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the initial conditions in a given volume starting from the dark matter distribution in real space. In our algorithm, objects are first moved back iteratively along estimated potential gradients, with a progressively reduced smoothing scale, until a nearly uniform catalog is obtained. The linear initial density is then estimated as the divergence of the cumulative displacement, with an optional second-order correction. This algorithm should undo nonlinear effects up to one-loop order, including the higher-order infrared resummation piece. We test the method using dark matter simulations in real space. At redshift $z=0$, we find that after eight iterations the reconstructed density is more than $95\%$ correlated with the initial density at $k\le 0.35\; h\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$. The reconstruction also reduces the power in the difference between reconstructed and initial fields by more than 2 orders of magnitude at $k\le 0.2\; h\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, and it extends the range of scales where the full broadband shape of the power spectrum matches linear theory by a factor of 2-3. As a specific application, we consider measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale that can be improved by reducing the degradation effects of large-scale flows. In our idealized dark matter simulations, the method improves the BAO signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 2.7 at $z=0$ and by a factor of 2.5 at $z=0.6$, improving standard BAO reconstruction by $70\%$ at $z=0$ and $30\%$ at $z=0.6$, and matching the optimal BAO signal and signal-to-noise ratio of the linear density in the same volume. For BAO, the iterative nature of the reconstruction is the most important aspect.
  • We study the matter bispectrum of large-scale structure by comparing the predictions of different perturbative and phenomenological models with the full three-dimensional bispectrum from $N$-body simulations estimated using modal methods. We show that among the perturbative approaches, effective field theory succeeds in extending the range of validity furthest on intermediate scales, at the cost of free additional parameters. By studying the halo model, we show that although it is satisfactory in the deeply non-linear regime, it predicts a deficit of power on intermediate scales, worsening at redshifts $z>0$. By comparison with the $N$-body bispectrum on those scales, we show that there is a significant squeezed component underestimated in the halo model. On the basis of these results, we propose a new three-shape model, based on the tree-level, squeezed and constant bispectrum shapes we identified in the halo model; after calibration this fits the simulations on all scales and redshifts of interest. We extend this model further to primordial non-Gaussianity of the local and equilateral types by showing that the same shapes can be used to describe the additional non-Gaussian component in the matter bispectrum. This method provides a HALOFIT-like prototype of the bispectrum that could be used to describe and test parameter dependencies and should be relevant for the bispectrum of weak gravitational lensing and wider applications.
  • CMB and lensing reconstruction power spectra are powerful probes of cosmology. However they are correlated, since the CMB power spectra are lensed and the lensing reconstruction is constructed using CMB multipoles. We perform a full analysis of the auto- and cross-covariances, including polarization power spectra and minimum variance lensing estimators, and compare with simulations of idealized future CMB-S4 observations. Covariances sourced by fluctuations in the unlensed CMB and instrumental noise can largely be removed by using a realization-dependent subtraction of lensing reconstruction noise, leaving a relatively simple covariance model that is dominated by lensing-induced terms and well described by a small number of principal components. The correlations between the CMB and lensing power spectra will be detectable at the level of $\sim 5\sigma$ for a CMB-S4 mission, and neglecting those could underestimate some parameter error bars by several tens of percent. However we found that the inclusion of external priors or data sets to estimate parameter error bars can make the impact of the correlations almost negligible.
  • Modeling the large-scale structure of the universe on nonlinear scales has the potential to substantially increase the science return of upcoming surveys by increasing the number of modes available for model comparisons. One way to achieve this is to model nonlinear scales perturbatively. Unfortunately, this involves high-dimensional loop integrals that are cumbersome to evaluate. Trying to simplify this, we show how two-loop (next-to-next-to-leading order) corrections to the density power spectrum can be reduced to low-dimensional, radial integrals. Many of those can be evaluated with a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform, which is significantly faster than the five-dimensional Monte-Carlo integrals that are needed otherwise. The general idea of this FFT-PT method is to switch between Fourier and position space to avoid convolutions and integrate over orientations, leaving only radial integrals. This reformulation is independent of the underlying shape of the initial linear density power spectrum and should easily accommodate features such as those from baryonic acoustic oscillations. We also discuss how to account for halo bias and redshift space distortions.
  • Forming a three dimensional view of the Universe is a long-standing goal of astronomical observations, and one that becomes increasingly difficult at high redshift. In this paper we discuss how tomography of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at $z\simeq 2.5$ can be used to estimate the redshifts of massive galaxies in a large volume of the Universe based on spectra of galaxies in their background. Our method is based on the fact that hierarchical structure formation leads to a strong dependence of the halo density on large-scale environment. A map of the latter can thus be used to refine our knowledge of the redshifts of halos and the galaxies and AGN which they host. We show that tomographic maps of the IGM at a resolution of $2.5\,h^{-1}$Mpc can determine the redshifts of more than 90 per cent of massive galaxies with redshift uncertainty $\Delta z/(1+z)=0.01$. Higher resolution maps allow such redshift estimation for lower mass galaxies and halos.
  • Given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in $k/k_{\rm NL}$, where $k$ is the wavenumber of interest and $k_{\rm NL}$ is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to $1\%$ level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to $k\simeq 0.3 h\,$Mpc$^{-1}$ and $k\simeq 0.6 h\,$Mpc$^{-1}$ at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which $k_{\rm NL}$ is smaller than in the previously considered cases ($\sigma_8=0.9$), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with $N$-body simulations up to $k\simeq 0.25 h\,$Mpc$^{-1}$, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest $k$'s of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to $k\simeq 0.25 h\,$Mpc$^{-1}$, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum $k$, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.
  • The usual fluid equations describing the large-scale evolution of mass density in the universe can be written as local in the density, velocity divergence, and velocity potential fields. As a result, the perturbative expansion in small density fluctuations, usually written in terms of convolutions in Fourier space, can be written as a series of products of these fields evaluated at the same location in configuration space. Based on this, we establish a new method to numerically evaluate the 1-loop power spectrum (i.e., Fourier transform of the 2-point correlation function) with one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms. This is exact and a few orders of magnitude faster than previously used numerical approaches. Numerical results of the new method are in excellent agreement with the standard quadrature integration method. This fast model evaluation can in principle be extended to higher loop order where existing codes become painfully slow. Our approach follows by writing higher order corrections to the 2-point correlation function as, e.g., the correlation between two second-order fields or the correlation between a linear and a third-order field. These are then decomposed into products of correlations of linear fields and derivatives of linear fields. The method can also be viewed as evaluating three-dimensional Fourier space convolutions using products in configuration space, which may also be useful in other contexts where similar integrals appear.
  • The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the non-zero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB Stage-III and Stage-IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order one percent of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and thus only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.
  • We study the matter bispectrum of the large-scale structure by comparing different perturbative and phenomenological models with measurements from $N$-body simulations obtained with a modal bispectrum estimator. Using shape and amplitude correlators, we directly compare simulated data with theoretical models over the full three-dimensional domain of the bispectrum, for different redshifts and scales. We review and investigate the main perturbative methods in the literature that predict the one-loop bispectrum: standard perturbation theory, effective field theory, resummed Lagrangian and renormalised perturbation theory, calculating the latter also at two loops for some triangle configurations. We find that effective field theory (EFT) succeeds in extending the range of validity furthest into the mildly nonlinear regime, albeit at the price of free extra parameters requiring calibration on simulations. For the more phenomenological halo model, we confirm that despite its validity in the deeply nonlinear regime it has a deficit of power on intermediate scales, which worsens at higher redshifts; this issue is ameliorated, but not solved, by combined halo-perturbative models. We show from simulations that in this transition region there is a strong squeezed bispectrum component that is significantly underestimated in the halo model at earlier redshifts. We thus propose a phenomenological method for alleviating this deficit, which we develop into a simple phenomenological "three-shape" benchmark model based on the three fundamental shapes we have obtained from studying the halo model. When calibrated on the simulations, this three-shape benchmark model accurately describes the bispectrum on all scales and redshifts considered, providing a prototype bispectrum HALOFIT-like methodology that could be used to describe and test parameter dependencies.
  • As galaxy surveys begin to measure the imprint of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) on large-scale structure at the sub-percent level, reconstruction techniques that reduce the contamination from nonlinear clustering become increasingly important. Inverting the nonlinear continuity equation, we propose an Eulerian growth-shift reconstruction algorithm that does not require the displacement of any objects, which is needed for the standard Lagrangian BAO reconstruction algorithm. In real-space DM-only simulations the algorithm yields 95% of the BAO signal-to-noise obtained from standard reconstruction. The reconstructed power spectrum is obtained by adding specific simple 3- and 4-point statistics to the pre-reconstruction power spectrum, making it very transparent how additional BAO information from higher-point statistics is included in the power spectrum through the reconstruction process. Analytical models of the reconstructed density for the two algorithms agree at second order. Based on similar modeling efforts, we introduce four additional reconstruction algorithms and discuss their performance.
  • Clustering of large-scale structure provides significant cosmological information through the power spectrum of density perturbations. Additional information can be gained from higher-order statistics like the bispectrum, especially to break the degeneracy between the linear halo bias $b_1$ and the amplitude of fluctuations $\sigma_8$. We propose new simple, computationally inexpensive bispectrum statistics that are near optimal for the specific applications like bias determination. Corresponding to the Legendre decomposition of nonlinear halo bias and gravitational coupling at second order, these statistics are given by the cross-spectra of the density with three quadratic fields: the squared density, a tidal term, and a shift term. For halos and galaxies the first two have associated nonlinear bias terms $b_2$ and $b_{s^2}$, respectively, while the shift term has none in the absence of velocity bias (valid in the $k \rightarrow 0$ limit). Thus the linear bias $b_1$ is best determined by the shift cross-spectrum, while the squared density and tidal cross-spectra mostly tighten constraints on $b_2$ and $b_{s^2}$ once $b_1$ is known. Since the form of the cross-spectra is derived from optimal maximum-likelihood estimation, they contain the full bispectrum information on bias parameters. Perturbative analytical predictions for their expectation values and covariances agree with simulations on large scales, $k\lesssim 0.09h/\mathrm{Mpc}$ at $z=0.55$ with Gaussian $R=20h^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}$ smoothing, for matter-matter-matter, and matter-matter-halo combinations. For halo-halo-halo cross-spectra the model also needs to include corrections to the Poisson stochasticity.
  • As confusion with lensing B-modes begins to limit experiments that search for primordial B-mode polarization, robust methods for delensing the CMB polarization sky are becoming increasingly important. We investigate in detail the possibility of delensing the CMB with the cosmic infrared background (CIB), emission from dusty star-forming galaxies that is an excellent tracer of the CMB lensing signal, in order to improve constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. We find that the maps of the CIB, such as current Planck satellite maps at 545 GHz, can be used to remove more than half of the lensing B-mode power. Calculating optimal combinations of different large-scale-structure tracers for delensing, we find that co-adding CIB data and external arcminute-resolution CMB lensing reconstruction can lead to significant additional improvements in delensing performance. We investigate whether measurement uncertainty in the CIB spectra will degrade the delensing performance if no model of the CIB spectra is assumed, and instead the CIB spectra are marginalized over, when constraining $r$. We find that such uncertainty does not significantly affect B-mode surveys smaller than a few thousand degrees. Even for larger surveys it causes only a moderate reduction in CIB delensing performance, especially if the surveys have high (arcminute) resolution, which allows self-calibration of the delensing procedure. Though further work on the impact of foreground residuals is required, our overall conclusions for delensing with current CIB data are optimistic: this delensing method can tighten constraints on $r$ by a factor up to $\approx2.2$, and by a factor up to $\approx4$ when combined with external $\approx 3 \mu$K-arcmin lensing reconstruction, without requiring the modeling of CIB properties. CIB delensing is thus a promising method for the upcoming generation of CMB polarization surveys.