• We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7<log_10(M_*/h^-2 M_sun)<11.7 and z<0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ~100 deg^2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M_sun>5x10^10 h^-2 M_sun, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as ~M_h^0.25. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8x10^11 h^-1 M_sun with a value of M_h/M_*=56_-10^+16 [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.
  • We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the GAMA survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric KiDS survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness larger than 4 to identify samples with comparable mean host halo masses but with a different radial distribution of satellite galaxies, which is a proxy for the formation time of the haloes. We measure the weak lensing signal for groups with a steeper than average and with a shallower than average satellite distribution and find no sign of halo assembly bias, with the bias ratio of $0.85^{+0.37}_{-0.25}$, which is consistent with the $\Lambda$CDM prediction. Our galaxy groups have typical masses of $10^{13} M_{\odot}/h$, naturally complementing previous studies of halo assembly bias on galaxy cluster scales.
  • We present predictions for the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile from the EAGLE hydrodynamical cosmological simulation at redshift z=0.18, in the spatial range 0.02 < R/(Mpc/h) < 2, and for five logarithmically equi-spaced stellar mass bins in the range 10.3 < $\log_{10}$(Mstar/ $M_{\odot}$) < 11.8. We compare these excess surface density profiles to the observed signal from background galaxies imaged by the Kilo Degree Survey around spectroscopically confirmed foreground galaxies from the GAMA survey. Exploiting the GAMA galaxy group catalogue, the profiles of central and satellite galaxies are computed separately for groups with at least five members to minimise contamination. EAGLE predictions are in broad agreement with the observed profiles for both central and satellite galaxies, although the signal is underestimated at R$\approx$0.5-2 Mpc/h for the highest stellar mass bins. When central and satellite galaxies are considered simultaneously, agreement is found only when the selection function of lens galaxies is taken into account in detail. Specifically, in the case of GAMA galaxies, it is crucial to account for the variation of the fraction of satellite galaxies in bins of stellar mass induced by the flux-limited nature of the survey. We report the inferred stellar-to-halo mass relation and we find good agreement with recent published results. We note how the precision of the galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles in the simulation holds the potential to constrain fine-grained aspects of the galaxy-dark matter connection.
  • Galaxies and their dark matter haloes are part of a complex network of mass structures, collectively called the cosmic web. Using the tidal tensor prescription these structures can be classified into four cosmic environments: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. As the cosmic web may influence the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and the galaxies they host, we aim to study the effect of these cosmic environments on the average mass of galactic haloes. To this end we measure the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile of 91,195 galaxies, within 0.039 < z < 0.263, from the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using ~100 square degrees of overlapping data from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS). In each of the four cosmic environments we model the contributions from group centrals, satellites and neighbouring groups to the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles. After correcting the lens samples for differences in the stellar mass distribution, we find no dependence of the average halo mass of central galaxies on their cosmic environment. We do find a significant increase in the average contribution of neighbouring groups to the lensing profile in increasingly dense cosmic environments. We show, however, that the observed effect can be entirely attributed to the galaxy density at much smaller scales (within 4 Mpc/h), which is correlated with the density of the cosmic environments. Within our current uncertainties we find no direct dependence of galaxy halo mass on their cosmic environment.
  • The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.
  • Galaxy shapes are not randomly oriented, rather they are statistically aligned in a way that can depend on formation environment, history and galaxy type. Studying the alignment of galaxies can therefore deliver important information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution as well as the growth of structure in the Universe. In this review paper we summarise key measurements of galaxy alignments, divided by galaxy type, scale and environment. We also cover the statistics and formalism necessary to understand the observations in the literature. With the emergence of weak gravitational lensing as a precision probe of cosmology, galaxy alignments have taken on an added importance because they can mimic cosmic shear, the effect of gravitational lensing by large-scale structure on observed galaxy shapes. This makes galaxy alignments, commonly referred to as intrinsic alignments, an important systematic effect in weak lensing studies. We quantify the impact of intrinsic alignments on cosmic shear surveys and finish by reviewing practical mitigation techniques which attempt to remove contamination by intrinsic alignments.
  • The shapes of galaxies are not randomly oriented on the sky. During the galaxy formation and evolution process, environment has a strong influence, as tidal gravitational fields in the large-scale structure tend to align nearby galaxies. Additionally, events such as galaxy mergers affect the relative alignments of both the shapes and angular momenta of galaxies throughout their history. These "intrinsic galaxy alignments" are known to exist, but are still poorly understood. This review will offer a pedagogical introduction to the current theories that describe intrinsic galaxy alignments, including the apparent difference in intrinsic alignment between early- and late-type galaxies and the latest efforts to model them analytically. It will then describe the ongoing efforts to simulate intrinsic alignments using both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations. Due to the relative youth of this field, there is still much to be done to understand intrinsic galaxy alignments and this review summarises the current state of the field, providing a solid basis for future work.
  • We report results for the alignments of galaxies in the EAGLE and cosmo-OWLS simulations as a function of galaxy separation and halo mass. The combination of these hydro-cosmological simulations enables us to span four orders of magnitude in halo mass ($10.7<log_{10}(M_{200}/[h^{-1}M_\odot])<15$) and a large range of separations ($-1<log_{10}(r/[h^{-1}Mpc])< 2$). We focus on two classes of alignments: the orientations of galaxies with respect to either the directions to, or the orientations of, surrounding galaxies. We find that the strength of the alignment is a strongly decreasing function of the distance between galaxies. The orientation-direction alignment can remain significant up to ~100 Mpc, for galaxies hosted by the most massive haloes in our simulations. Galaxies hosted by more massive subhaloes show stronger alignment. At a fixed halo mass, more aspherical or prolate galaxies exhibit stronger alignments. The spatial distribution of satellites is anisotropic and significantly aligned with the major axis of the main host halo. The major axis of satellite galaxies, when all stars are considered, are preferentially aligned towards the centre of the main host halo. The predicted projected direction-orientation alignment, $\epsilon_{g+}(r_{p})$, is in broad agreement with recent observations when only stars within the typical observable extent of a galaxy are used to define galaxy orientations. We find that the orientation-orientation alignment is weaker than the orientation-direction alignment on all scales. Overall, the strength of galaxy alignments depends strongly on the subset of stars that are used to measure the orientations of galaxies and it is always weaker than the alignment of the dark matter haloes. Thus, alignment models that use halo orientation as a direct proxy for galaxy orientation will overestimate the impact of intrinsic alignments on weak lensing analyses.
  • We use the first 100 sq. deg. of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to determine the galaxy halo mass of ~10,000 spectroscopically-confirmed satellite galaxies in massive ($M > 10^{13}h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot$) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses $\log M_{\rm sub} /(h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot) \approx 11.7 - 12.2$ consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, $\log M_{\rm \star,sat}/(h^{-2}{\rm M}_\odot) \sim 10.5$, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of $M_{\rm \star,sat} /M_{\rm sub} \approx 0.04 h^{-1}$ . The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass $M_{\rm sub} \sim 0.015M_{\rm host}$ independent of host halo mass, in broad agreement with the expectations of structure formation in a $\Lambda$CDM universe.
  • We report the alignment and shape of dark matter, stellar, and hot gas distributions in the EAGLE and cosmo-OWLS simulations. The combination of these state-of-the-art hydro-cosmological simulations enables us to span four orders of magnitude in halo mass ($11 < log_{10}(M_{200}/ [h^{-1}M_\odot]) < 15$), a wide radial range ($-2.3 < log_{10}(r/[h^{-1}Mpc ]) < 1.3$) and redshifts $0 < z < 1$. The shape parameters of the dark matter, stellar and hot gas distributions follow qualitatively similar trends: they become more aspherical (and triaxial) with increasing halo mass, radius and redshift. We measure the misalignment of the baryonic components (hot gas and stars) of galaxies with their host halo as a function of halo mass, radius, redshift, and galaxy type (centrals vs satellites and early- vs late-type). Overall, galaxies align well with the local distribution of the total (mostly dark) matter. However, the stellar distributions on galactic scales exhibit a median misalignment of about 45-50 degrees with respect to their host haloes. This misalignment is reduced to 25-30 degrees in the most massive haloes ($13 < log_{10}(M_{200}/ [h^{-1}M_\odot ]) < 15$). Half of the disc galaxies in the EAGLE simulations have a misalignment angle with respect to their host haloes larger than 40 degrees. We present fitting functions and tabulated values for the probability distribution of galaxy-halo misalignment to enable a straightforward inclusion of our results into models of galaxy formations based on purely collisionless N-body simulations.
  • We study the evolution of the luminosity-to-halo mass relation of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We select a sample of 52 000 LOWZ and CMASS LRGs from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) SDSS-DR10 in the ~450 deg^2 that overlaps with imaging data from the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2), group them into bins of absolute magnitude and redshift and measure their weak lensing signals. The source redshift distribution has a median of 0.7, which allows us to study the lensing signal as a function of lens redshift. We interpret the lensing signal using a halo model, from which we obtain the halo masses as well as the normalisations of the mass-concentration relations. We find that the concentration of haloes that host LRGs is consistent with dark matter only simulations once we allow for miscentering or satellites in the modelling. The slope of the luminosity-to-halo mass relation has a typical value of 1.4 and does not change with redshift, but we do find evidence for a change in amplitude: the average halo mass of LOWZ galaxies increases by 25_{-14}^{+16} % between z=0.36 and 0.22 to an average value of 6.43+/-0.52 x 10^13 h70^-1 Msun. If we extend the redshift range using the CMASS galaxies and assume that they are the progenitors of the LOWZ sample, we find that the average mass of LRGs increases by 80^{+39}_{-28} % between z=0.6 and 0.2
  • Masses of clusters of galaxies from weak gravitational lensing analyses of ever larger samples are increasingly used as the reference to which baryonic scaling relations are compared. In this paper we revisit the analysis of a sample of 50 clusters studied as part of the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project. We examine the key sources of systematic error in cluster masses. We quantify the robustness of our shape measurements and calibrate our algorithm empirically using extensive image simulations. The source redshift distribution is revised using the latest state-of-the-art photometric redshift catalogs that include new deep near-infrared observations. Nonetheless we find that the uncertainty in the determination of photometric redshifts is the largest source of systematic error for our mass estimates. We use our updated masses to determine b, the bias in the hydrostatic mass, for the clusters detected by Planck. Our results suggest 1-b=0.76+-0.05(stat)}+-0.06(syst)}, which does not resolve the tension with the measurements from the primary cosmic microwave background.
  • Torques acting on galaxies lead to physical alignments, but the resulting ellipticity correlations are difficult to predict. As they constitute a major contaminant for cosmic shear studies, it is important to constrain the intrinsic alignment signal observationally. We measured the alignments of satellite galaxies within 90 massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.05<z<0.55 and quantified their impact on the cosmic shear signal. We combined a sample of 38,104 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts with high-quality data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We used phase-space information to select 14,576 cluster members, 14,250 of which have shape measurements and measured three different types of alignment: the radial alignment of satellite galaxies toward the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), the common orientations of satellite galaxies and BCGs, and the radial alignments of satellites with each other. Residual systematic effects are much smaller than the statistical uncertainties. We detect no galaxy alignment of any kind out to at least 3 r200. The signal is consistent with zero for both blue and red galaxies, bright and faint ones, and also for subsamples of clusters based on redshift, dynamical mass, and dynamical state. These conclusions are unchanged if we expand the sample with bright cluster members from the red sequence. We augment our constraints with those from the literature to estimate the importance of the intrinsic alignments of satellites compared to those of central galaxies, for which the alignments are described by the linear alignment model. Comparison of the alignment signals to the expected uncertainties of current surveys such as the Kilo-Degree Survey suggests that the linear alignment model is an adequate treatment of intrinsic alignments, but it is not clear whether this will be the case for larger surveys.
  • The clustering of galaxies and the matter distribution around them can be described using the halo model complemented with a realistic description of the way galaxies populate dark matter haloes. This has been used successfully to describe statistical properties of samples of galaxies at z<0.2. Without adjusting any model parameters, we compare the predicted weak lensing signal induced by Luminous Red Galaxies to measurements from SDSS DR7 on much larger scales (up to ~90 h_{70}^{-1} Mpc) and at higher redshift (z~0.4). We find excellent agreement, suggesting that the model captures the main properties of the galaxy-dark matter connection. To extend the comparison to lenses at even higher redshifts we complement the SDSS data with shape measurements from the deeper RCS2, resulting in precise lensing measurements for lenses up to z~0.6. These measurements are also well described using the same model. Considering solely these weak lensing measurements, we robustly assess that, up to z~0.6, the number of central galaxies as a function of halo mass is well described by a log-normal distribution with scatter $\sigma_{\log L_{\rm c}}=0.146\pm0.011$, in agreement with previous independent studies at lower redshift. Our results demonstrate the value of complementing the information about the properties of the (lens) galaxies provided by SDSS with deeper, high-quality imaging data.
  • We analyse the evolution of turbulence and gravitational instability of a galactic disc in a quasi-steady state governed by cosmological inflow. We focus on the possibility that the coupling between the in-streaming gas and the disc is maximal, e.g., via dense clumps, and ask whether the streams could be the driver of turbulence in an unstable disc with a Toomre parameter Q~1. Our fiducial model assumes an efficiency of ~0.5 per dynamical time for the decay of turbulence energy, and ~0.02 for each of the processes that deplete the disc gas, i.e., star formation, outflow, and inflow within the disc into a central bulge. In this case, the in-streaming drives a ratio of turbulent to rotation velocity sigma/V~0.2-0.3, which at z~2 induces an instability with Q~1, both as observed. However, in conflict with observations, this model predicts that sigma/V remains constant with time, independent of the cosmological accretion rate, because mass and turbulence have the same external source. Such strongly coupled cosmological inflow tends to stabilize the disc at low z, with Q ~ a few, which may be consistent with observations. The instability could instead be maintained for longer, with a properly declining sigma/V, if it is self-regulated to oscillations about Q~1 by a duty cycle for disc depletion. However, the 'off' phases of this duty cycle become long at low z, which may be hard to reconcile with observations. Alternatively, the coupling between the in-streaming gas and the disc may weaken in time, reflecting an evolving nature of the accretion. If, instead, that coupling is weak at all times, the likely energy source for self-regulated stirring up of the turbulence is the inflow within the disc down the potential gradient (studied in a companion paper).
  • We simultaneously constrain cosmology and galaxy bias using measurements of galaxy abundances, galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the conditional luminosity function (which describes the halo occupation statistics as function of galaxy luminosity) combined with the halo model (which describes the non-linear matter field in terms of its halo building blocks) to describe the galaxy-dark matter connection. We explicitly account for residual redshift space distortions in the projected galaxy-galaxy correlation functions, and marginalize over uncertainties in the scale dependence of the halo bias and the detailed structure of dark matter haloes. Under the assumption of a spatially flat, vanilla {\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we focus on constraining the matter density, {\Omega}m, and the normalization of the matter power spectrum, {\sigma}8, and we adopt WMAP7 priors for the spectral index, the Hubble parameter, and the baryon density. We obtain that \Omegam = 0.278_{-0.026}^{+0.023} and {\sigma}8 = 0.763_{-0.049}^{+0.064} (95% CL). These results are robust to uncertainties in the radial number density distribution of satellite galaxies, while allowing for non-Poisson satellite occupation distributions results in a slightly lower value for {\sigma}8 (0.744_{-0.047}^{+0.056}). These constraints are in excellent agreement (at the 1{\sigma} level) with the cosmic microwave background constraints from WMAP. This demonstrates that the use of a realistic and accurate model for galaxy bias, down to the smallest non-linear scales currently observed in galaxy surveys, leads to results perfectly consistent with the vanilla {\Lambda}CDM cosmology.
  • We quantify the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters characterizing the energy density of matter (\Omega_m), the amplitude of the power spectrum of matter fluctuations (\sigma_8), the energy density of neutrinos (\Omega_{\nu}) and the dark energy equation of state (w_0) can be constrained using data from large galaxy redshift surveys. We advocate a joint analysis of the abundance of galaxies, galaxy clustering, and the galaxy-galaxy weak lensing signal in order to simultaneously constrain the halo occupation statistics (i.e., galaxy bias) and the cosmological parameters of interest. We parameterize the halo occupation distribution of galaxies in terms of the conditional luminosity function and use the analytical framework of the halo model described in our companion paper (van den Bosch et al. 2012), to predict the relevant observables. By performing a Fisher matrix analysis, we show that a joint analysis of these observables, even with the precision with which they are currently measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, can be used to obtain tight constraints on the cosmological parameters, fully marginalized over uncertainties in galaxy bias. We demonstrate that the cosmological constraints from such an analysis are nearly uncorrelated with the halo occupation distribution constraints, thus, minimizing the systematic impact of any imperfections in modeling the halo occupation statistics on the cosmological constraints. In fact, we demonstrate that the constraints from such an analysis are both complementary to and competitive with existing constraints on these parameters from a number of other techniques, such as cluster abundances, cosmic shear and/or baryon acoustic oscillations, thus paving the way to test the concordance cosmological model.
  • We present a new method that simultaneously solves for cosmology and galaxy bias on non-linear scales. The method uses the halo model to analytically describe the (non-linear) matter distribution, and the conditional luminosity function (CLF) to specify the halo occupation statistics. For a given choice of cosmological parameters, this model can be used to predict the galaxy luminosity function, as well as the two-point correlation functions of galaxies, and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal, both as function of scale and luminosity. In this paper, the first in a series, we present the detailed, analytical model, which we test against mock galaxy redshift surveys constructed from high-resolution numerical $N$-body simulations. We demonstrate that our model, which includes scale-dependence of the halo bias and a proper treatment of halo exclusion, reproduces the 3-dimensional galaxy-galaxy correlation and the galaxy-matter cross-correlation (which can be projected to predict the observables) with an accuracy better than 10 (in most cases 5) percent. Ignoring either of these effects, as is often done, results in systematic errors that easily exceed 40 percent on scales of $\sim 1 h^{-1}\Mpc$, where the data is typically most accurate. Finally, since the projected correlation functions of galaxies are never obtained by integrating the redshift space correlation function along the line-of-sight out to infinity, simply because the data only cover a finite volume, they are still affected by residual redshift space distortions (RRSDs). Ignoring these, as done in numerous studies in the past, results in systematic errors that easily exceed 20 perent on large scales ($r_\rmp \gta 10 h^{-1}\Mpc$). We show that it is fairly straightforward to correct for these RRSDs, to an accuracy better than $\sim 2$ percent, using a mildly modified version of the linear Kaiser formalism.
  • We present a method that uses observations of galaxies to simultaneously constrain cosmological parameters and the galaxy-dark matter connection (aka halo occupation statistics). The latter describes how galaxies are distributed over dark matter haloes, and is an imprint of the poorly understood physics of galaxy formation. A generic problem of using galaxies to constrain cosmology is that galaxies are a biased tracer of the mass distribution, and this bias is generally unknown. The great advantage of simultaneously constraining cosmology and halo occupation statistics is that this effectively allows cosmological constraints marginalized over the uncertainties regarding galaxy bias. Not only that, it also yields constraints on the galaxy-dark matter connection, this time properly marginalized over cosmology, which is of great value to inform theoretical models of galaxy formation. We use a combination of the analytical halo model and the conditional luminosity function to describe the galaxy-dark matter connection, which we use to model the abundance, clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing properties of the galaxy population. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to gauge the complementarity of these different observables, and present some preliminary results from an analysis based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our results are complementary to and perfectly consistent with the results from the 7 year data release of the WMAP mission, strengthening the case for a true 'concordance' cosmology.
  • We formulate the concept of non-linear and stochastic galaxy biasing in the framework of halo occupation statistics. Using two-point statistics in projection, we define the galaxy bias function, b_g(r_p), and the galaxy-dark matter cross-correlation function, R_{gm}(r_p), where r_p is the projected distance. We use the analytical halo model to predict how the scale dependence of b_g and R_{gm}, over the range 0.1 Mpc/h < r_p < 30 Mpc/h, depends on the non-linearity and stochasticity in halo occupation models. In particular we quantify the effect due to the presence of central galaxies, the assumption for the radial distribution of satellite galaxies, the richness of the halo, and the Poisson character of the probability to have a certain number of satellite galaxies in a halo of a certain mass. Overall, brighter galaxies reveal a stronger scale dependence, and out to a larger radius. In real-space, we find that galaxy bias becomes scale independent, with R_{gm} = 1, for radii r > 1 - 5 Mpc/h, depending on luminosity. However, galaxy bias is scale-dependent out to much larger radii when one uses the projected quantities defined in this paper. These projected bias functions have the advantage that they are more easily accessible observationally and that their scale dependence carries a wealth of information regarding the properties of galaxy biasing. To observationally constrain the parameters of the halo occupation statistics and to unveil the origin of galaxy biasing we propose the use of the bias function Gamma_{gm}(r_p)=b_g(r_p)/R_{gm}(r_p). This function is obtained via a combination of weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering, and it can be measured using existing and forthcoming imaging and spectroscopic galaxy surveys.
  • We address the cosmological evolution of violent gravitational instability in high-redshift, massive, star-forming galactic discs. To this aim, we integrate in time the equations of mass and energy conservation under self-regulated instability of a two-component disc of gas and stars. The disc is assumed to be continuously fed by cold gas at the average cosmological rate. The gas forms stars and is partly driven away by stellar feedback. The gas and stars flow inward through the disc to a central bulge due to torques that drive angular momentum outwards. The gravitational energy released by the mass inflow down the gravitational potential gradient drives the disc turbulence that maintains the disc unstable with a Toomre instability parameter Q~1, compensating for the dissipative losses of the gas turbulence and raising the stellar velocity dispersion. We follow the velocity dispersion of stars and gas as they heat and cool respectively and search for disc `stabilization', to be marked by a low gas velocity dispersion comparable to the speed of sound ~10 km/s. We vary the model parameters that characterize the accreted gas fraction, turbulence dissipation rate, star-formation rate, and stellar feedback. We find that as long as the gas input roughly follows the average cosmological rate, the disc instability is a robust phenomenon at high redshift till z~1, driven by the high surface density and high gas fraction due to the intense cosmological accretion. For a broad range of model parameter values, the discs tend to `stabilize' at z~0-0.5 as they become dominated by hot stars. When the model parameters are pushed to extreme values, the discs may stabilize as early as z~2, with the gas loss by strong outflows serving as the dominant stabilizing factor.
  • Disk galaxies at high redshift have been predicted to maintain high gas surface densities due to continuous feeding by intense cold streams leading to violent gravitational instability, transient features and giant clumps. Gravitational torques between the perturbations drive angular momentum out and mass in, and the inflow provides the energy for keeping strong turbulence. We use analytic estimates of the inflow for a self-regulated unstable disk at a Toomre stability parameter Q~1, and isolated galaxy simulations capable of resolving the nuclear inflow down to the central parsec. We predict an average inflow rate ~10 Msun/yr through the disk of a 10^11 Msun galaxy, with conditions representative of z~2 stream-fed disks. The inflow rate scales with disk mass and (1+z)^{3/2}. It includes clump migration and inflow of the smoother component, valid even if clumps disrupt. This inflow grows the bulge, while only a fraction ~ 10^-3 of it needs to accrete onto a central black hole (BH), in order to obey the observed BH-bulge relation. A galaxy of 10^11 Msun at z~2 is expected to host a BH of ~10^8 Msun, accreting on average with moderate sub-Eddington luminosity L_X ~ 10^42-43 erg/s, accompanied by brighter episodes when dense clumps coalesce. We note that in rare massive galaxies at z~6, the same process may feed 10^9 Msun BH at the Eddington rate. High central gas column densities can severely obscure AGN in high-redshift disks, possibly hindering their detection in deep X-ray surveys.
  • We use the kinematics of satellite galaxies that orbit around the central galaxy in a dark matter halo to infer the scaling relations between halo mass and central galaxy properties. Using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we investigate the halo mass-luminosity relation (MLR) and the halo mass-stellar mass relation (MSR) of central galaxies. In particular, we focus on the dependence of these scaling relations on the colour of the central galaxy. We find that red central galaxies on average occupy more massive haloes than blue central galaxies of the same luminosity. However, at fixed stellar mass there is no appreciable difference in the average halo mass of red and blue centrals, especially for M* $\lsim$ 10^{10.5} h^{-2} Msun. This indicates that stellar mass is a better indicator of halo mass than luminosity. Nevertheless, we find that the scatter in halo masses at fixed stellar mass is non-negligible for both red and blue centrals. It increases as a function of stellar mass for red centrals but shows a fairly constant behaviour for blue centrals. We compare the scaling relations obtained in this paper with results from other independent studies of satellite kinematics, with results from a SDSS galaxy group catalog, from galaxy-galaxy weak lensing measurements, and from subhalo abundance matching studies. Overall, these different techniques yield MLRs and MSRs in fairly good agreement with each other (typically within a factor of two), indicating that we are converging on an accurate and reliable description of the galaxy-dark matter connection. We briefly discuss some of the remaining discrepancies among the various methods.
  • We use galaxy groups selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) together with mass models for individual groups to study the galaxy-galaxy lensing signals expected from galaxies of different luminosities and morphological types. We compare our model predictions with the observational results obtained from the SDSS by Mandelbaum et al. (2006) for the same samples of galaxies. The observational results are well reproduced in a $\Lambda$CDM model based on the WMAP 3-year data, but a $\Lambda$CDM model with higher $\sigma_8$, such as the one based on the WMAP 1-year data,significantly over-predicts the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal. We model, separately, the contributions to the galaxy-galaxy lensing signals from different galaxies: central versus satellite, early-type versus late-type, and galaxies in halos of different masses. We also examine how the predicted galaxy-galaxy lensing signal depends on the shape, density profile, and the location of the central galaxy with respect to its host halo.
  • Galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing probe the connection between galaxies and their dark matter haloes in complementary ways. On one hand, the halo occupation statistics inferred from the observed clustering properties of galaxies are degenerate with the adopted cosmology. Consequently, different cosmologies imply different mass-to-light ratios for dark matter haloes. On the other hand, galaxy-galaxy lensing yields direct constraints on the actual mass-to-light ratios and it can be used to break this degeneracy, and thus to constrain cosmological parameters. In this paper we establish the link between galaxy luminosity and dark matter halo mass using the conditional luminosity function (CLF). We constrain the CLF parameters using the galaxy luminosity function and the luminosity dependence of the correlation lengths of galaxies. The resulting CLF models are used to predict the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal. For a cosmology with $(\Omega_{\rm m},\sigma_8)=(0.238,0.734)$, the model accurately fits the galaxy-galaxy lensing data obtained from the SDSS. For a comparison cosmology with $(\Omega_{\rm m},\sigma_8)=(0.3,0.9)$, however, we can accurately fit the luminosity function and clustering properties of the galaxy population, but the model predicts mass-to-light ratios that are too high, resulting in a strong overprediction of the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal. We conclude that the combination of galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing is a powerful probe of the galaxy-dark matter connection, with the potential to yield tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Since this method mainly probes the mass distribution on non-linear scales, it is complementary to constraints obtained from the galaxy power-spectrum, which mainly probes the large-scale (linear) matter distribution.