• We analyse the Kormendy relations (KRs) of the two Frontier Fields clusters, Abell S1063, at z = 0.348, and MACS J1149.5+2223, at z = 0.542, exploiting very deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry and VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy. With this novel dataset, we are able to investigate how the KR parameters depend on the cluster galaxy sample selection and how this affects studies of galaxy evolution based on the KR. We define and compare four different galaxy samples according to: (a) S\'ersic indices: early-type ('ETG'), (b) visual inspection: 'ellipticals', (c) colours: 'red', (d) spectral properties: 'passive'. The classification is performed for a complete sample of galaxies with m$_{\textit{F814W}} \le$ 22.5 ABmag (M$_{*}$ $\gtrsim 10^{10.0}$ M$_{\odot}$). To derive robust galaxy structural parameters, we use two methods: (1) an iterative estimate of structural parameters using images of increasing size, in order to deal with closely separated galaxies and (2) different background estimations, to deal with the Intracluster light contamination. The comparison between the KRs obtained from the different samples suggests that the sample selection could affect the estimate of the best-fitting KR parameters. The KR built with ETGs is fully consistent with the one obtained for ellipticals and passive. On the other hand, the KR slope built on the red sample is only marginally consistent with those obtained with the other samples. We also release the photometric catalogue with structural parameters for the galaxies included in the present analysis.
  • We have investigated the shape of the extinction curve in the infrared up to ~25 {\mu}m for the Orion A star-forming complex. The basis of this work is near-infrared data acquired with VISTA, in combination with Pan-STARRS and mid-infrared Spitzer photometry. We obtain colour excess ratios for eight passbands by fitting a series of colour-colour diagrams. The fits are performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, together with a linear model under a Bayesian formalism. The resulting colour excess ratios are directly interpreted as a measure of the extinction law. We show that the Orion A molecular cloud is characterized by flat mid-infrared extinction, similar to many other recently studied sightlines. Moreover, we find statistically significant evidence that the extinction law from ~1 {\mu}m to at least ~6 {\mu}m varies across the cloud. In particular, we find a gradient along galactic longitude, where regions near the ONC show a different extinction law compared to L1641 and L1647, the low-mass star-forming sites in the cloud complex. These variations are of the order of only 3% and are most likely caused by the influence of the massive stars on their surrounding medium. While the observed general trends in our measurements are in agreement with model predictions, both well-established and new dust grain models are not able to fully reproduce our infrared extinction curve. We also present a new extinction map featuring a resolution of 1 arcmin and revisit the correlation between extinction and dust optical depth. This analysis shows that cloud substructure, which is not sampled by background sources, affects the conversion factor between these two measures. In conclusion, we argue that specific characteristics of the infrared extinction law are still not well understood, but Orion A can serve as an unbiased template for future studies.
  • We present new high resolution and dynamic range dust column density and temperature maps of the California Molecular Cloud derived from a combination of Planck and Herschel dust-emission maps, and 2MASS NIR dust-extinction maps. We used these data to determine the ratio of the 2.2 micron extinction coefficient to the 850 micron opacity and found the value to be close to that found in similar studies of the Orion B and Perseus clouds but higher than that characterizing the Orion A cloud, indicating that variations in the fundamental optical properties of dust may exist between local clouds. We show that over a wide range of extinction, the column density probability distribution function (PDF$_N$) of the cloud can be well described by a simple power law with an index that represents a steeper decline with column density than found in similar studies of the Orion and Perseus clouds. Using only the protostellar population of the cloud and our extinction maps we investigate the Schmidt relation within the cloud. We show that the protostellar surface density, $\Sigma_*$, is directly proportional to the ratio of the protostellar and cloud pdfs. We use the cumulative distribution of protostars to infer the functional forms for both $\Sigma_*$ and PDF$_*$. We find that $\Sigma_*$ is best described by two power-law functions with steeper indicies than found in other local GMCs. We find that the protostellar pdf is a declining function of extinction also best described by two power-laws whose behavior mirrors that of $\Sigma_*$. Our observations suggest that variations both in the slope of the Schmidt relation and in the sizes of the protostellar populations between GMCs are largely driven by variations in the slope of the cloud pdf. This confirms earlier studies suggesting that cloud structure plays a major role in setting the global star formation rates in GMCs.
  • In this paper we present a novel method to identify and characterize stellar clusters deeply embedded in a dark molecular cloud. The method is based on measuring stellar surface density in wide-field infrared images using star counting techniques. It takes advantage of the differing $H$-band luminosity functions (HLFs) of field stars and young stellar populations and is able to statistically associate each star in an image as a member of either the background stellar population or a young stellar population projected on or near the cloud. Moreover, the technique corrects for the effects of differential extinction toward each individual star. We have tested this method against simulations as well as observations. In particular, we have applied the method to 2MASS point sources observed in the Orion A and B complexes, and the results obtained compare very well with those obtained from deep Spitzer and Chandra observations where presence of infrared excess or X-ray emission directly determines membership status for every star. Additionally, our method also identifies unobscured clusters and a low resolution version of the Orion stellar surface density map shows clearly the relatively unobscured and diffuse OB 1a and 1b sub-groups and provides useful insights on their spatial distribution.
  • The probability distribution function of column density (PDF) has become the tool of choice for cloud structure analysis and star formation studies. Its simplicity is attractive, and the PDF could offer access to cloud physical parameters otherwise difficult to measure, but there has been some confusion in the literature on the definition of its completeness limit and shape at the low column density end. In this Letter we use the natural definition of the completeness limit of a column density PDF, the last closed column-density contour inside a surveyed region, and apply it to a set of large-scale maps of nearby molecular clouds. We conclude that there is no observational evidence for log-normal PDFs in these objects. We find that all studied molecular clouds have PDFs well described by power-laws, including the diffuse cloud Polaris. Our results call for a new physical interpretation for the shape of the column density PDFs. We find that the slope of a cloud PDF is invariant to distance but not to the spatial arrangement of cloud material, and as such it is still a useful tool to investigate cloud structure.
  • We present a multiwavelength investigation of a region of a nearby giant molecular cloud that is distinguished by a minimal level of star formation activity. With our new 12CO(J=2-1) and 13CO(J=2-1) observations of a remote region within the middle of the California molecular cloud, we aim to investigate the relationship between filaments, cores, and a molecular outflow in a relatively pristine environment. An extinction map of the region from Herschel Space Observatory observations reveals the presence of two 2-pc-long filaments radiating from a high-extinction clump. Using the 13CO observations, we show that the filaments have coherent velocity gradients and that their mass-per-unit-lengths may exceed the critical value above which filaments are gravitationally unstable. The region exhibits structure with eight cores, at least one of which is a starless, prestellar core. We identify a low-velocity, low-mass molecular outflow that may be driven by a flat spectrum protostar. The outflow does not appear to be responsible for driving the turbulence in the core with which it is associated, nor does it provide significant support against gravitational collapse.
  • Dust extinction is the most robust tracer of the gas distribution in the interstellar medium, but measuring extinction is limited by the systematic uncertainties involved in estimating the intrinsic colors to background stars. In this paper we present a new technique, PNICER, that estimates intrinsic colors and extinction for individual stars using unsupervised machine learning algorithms. This new method aims to be free from any priors with respect to the column density and intrinsic color distribution. It is applicable to any combination of parameters and works in arbitrary numbers of dimensions. Furthermore, it is not restricted to color space. Extinction towards single sources is determined by fitting Gaussian Mixture Models along the extinction vector to (extinction-free) control field observations. In this way it becomes possible to describe the extinction for observed sources with probability densities. PNICER effectively eliminates known biases found in similar methods and outperforms them in cases of deep observational data where the number of background galaxies is significant, or when a large number of parameters is used to break degeneracies in the intrinsic color distributions. This new method remains computationally competitive, making it possible to correctly de-redden millions of sources within a matter of seconds. With the ever-increasing number of large-scale high-sensitivity imaging surveys, PNICER offers a fast and reliable way to efficiently calculate extinction for arbitrary parameter combinations without prior information on source characteristics. PNICER also offers access to the well-established NICER technique in a simple unified interface and is capable of building extinction maps including the NICEST correction for cloud substructure. PNICER is offered to the community as an open-source software solution and is entirely written in Python.
  • Orion A hosts the nearest massive star factory, thus offering a unique opportunity to resolve the processes connected with the formation of both low- and high-mass stars. Here we present the most detailed and sensitive near-infrared (NIR) observations of the entire molecular cloud to date. With the unique combination of high image quality, survey coverage, and sensitivity, our NIR survey of Orion A aims at establishing a solid empirical foundation for further studies of this important cloud. In this first paper we present the observations, data reduction, and source catalog generation. To demonstrate the data quality, we present a first application of our catalog to estimate the number of stars currently forming inside Orion A and to verify the existence of a more evolved young foreground population. We used the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to survey the entire Orion A molecular cloud in the NIR $J, H$, and $K_S$ bands, covering a total of $\sim$18.3 deg$^2$. We implemented all data reduction recipes independently of the ESO pipeline. Estimates of the young populations toward Orion A are derived via the $K_S$-band luminosity function. Our catalog (799995 sources) increases the source counts compared to the Two Micron All Sky Survey by about an order of magnitude. The 90% completeness limits are 20.4, 19.9, and 19.0 mag in $J, H$, and $K_S$, respectively. The reduced images have 20% better resolution on average compared to pipeline products. We find between 2300 and 3000 embedded objects in Orion A and confirm that there is an extended foreground population above the Galactic field, in agreement with previous work. The Orion A VISTA catalog represents the most detailed NIR view of the nearest massive star-forming region and provides a fundamental basis for future studies of star formation processes toward Orion.
  • (abridged) Methods: We derive maps of submillimeter dust optical depth and effective dust temperature from Herschel data that were calibrated against Planck. After calibration, we then fit a modified blackbody to the long-wavelength Herschel data, using the Planck-derived dust opacity spectral index beta, derived on scales of 30' (or ~1 pc). We use this model to make predictions of the submillimeter flux density at 850 micron, and we compare these in turn with APEX-Laboca observations. Results: A comparison of the submillimeter dust optical depth and near-infrared extinction data reveals evidence for an increased submillimeter dust opacity at high column densities, interpreted as an indication of grain growth in the inner parts of the core. Additionally, a comparison of the Herschel dust model and the Laboca data reveals that the frequency dependence of the submillimeter opacity, described by the spectral index beta, does not change. A single beta that is only slightly different from the Planck-derived value is sufficient to describe the data, beta=1.53+/-0.07. We apply a similar analysis to Barnard 68, a core with significantly lower column densities than FeSt 1-457, and we do not find evidence for grain growth but also a single beta. Conclusions: While we find evidence for grain growth from the dust opacity in FeSt 1-457, we find no evidence for significant variations in the dust opacity spectral index beta on scales 0.02<x<1 pc (or 36"<x<30'). The correction to the Planck-derived dust beta that we find in both cases is on the order of the measurement error, not including any systematic errors, and it would thus be reasonable to directly apply the dust beta from the Planck all-sky dust model. As a corollary, reliable effective temperature maps can be derived which would be otherwise affected by beta variations.
  • In this Letter we investigate the shape of the probability distribution of column densities (PDF) in molecular clouds. Through the use of low-noise, extinction-calibrated \textit{Herschel}/\textit{Planck} emission data for eight molecular clouds, we demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the PDFs of molecular clouds are not described well by log-normal functions, but are instead power laws with exponents close to two and with breaks between $A_K \simeq 0.1$ and $0.2\,\mathrm{mag}$, so close to the CO self-shielding limit and not far from the transition between molecular and atomic gas. Additionally, we argue that the intrinsic functional form of the PDF cannot be securely determined below $A_K \simeq 0.1\,\mathrm{mag}$, limiting our ability to investigate more complex models for the shape of the cloud PDF.
  • Galaxy intrinsic alignment can be a severe source of error in weak-lensing studies. The problem has been widely studied by numerical simulations and with heuristic models, but without a clear theoretical justification of its origin and amplitude. In particular, it is still unclear whether intrinsic alignment of galaxies is dominated by formation and accretion processes or by the effects of the instantaneous tidal field acting upon them. We investigate this question by developing a simple model of intrinsic alignment for elliptical galaxies, based on the instantaneous tidal field. Making use of the galaxy stellar distribution function, we estimate the intrinsic alignment signal and find that although it has the expected dependence on the tidal field, it is too weak to account for the observed signal. This is an indirect validation of the standard view that intrinsic alignment is caused by formation and/or accretion processes.
  • (abridged) [...] Methods: In a continued study of the molecular core population of the Pipe Nebula, we present a molecular-line survey of 52 cores. Previous research has shown a variety of different chemical evolutionary stages among the cores. Using the Mopra radio telescope, we observed the ground rotational transitions of HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, HNC, and N2H+. These data are complemented with near-infrared extinction maps to constrain the column densities, effective dust temperatures derived from Herschel data, and NH3-based gas kinetic temperatures. Results: The target cores are located across the nebula, span visual extinctions between 5 and 67 mag, and effective dust temperatures (averaged along the lines of sight) between 13 and 19 K. The extinction-normalized integrated line intensities, a proxy for the abundance in constant excitation conditions of optically thin lines, vary within an order of magnitude for a given molecule. The effective dust temperatures and gas kinetic temperatures are correlated, but the effective dust temperatures are consistently higher than the gas kinetic temperatures. Combining the molecular line and temperature data, we find that N2H+ is only detected toward the coldest and densest cores while other lines show no correlation with these core properties. Conclusions: Within this large sample, N2H+ is the only species to exclusively trace the coldest and densest cores, in agreement with chemical considerations. In contrast, the common high-density tracers HCN and HNC are present in a majority of cores, demonstrating the utility of these molecules to characterize cores over a large range of extinctions. The correlation between the effective dust temperatures and the gas kinetic temperatures suggests that the former are dominated by dust that is both dense and thermodynamically coupled to the dense gas traced by NH3. [...]
  • We present high-resolution, high dynamic range column-density and color-temperature maps of the Orion complex using a combination of Planck dust-emission maps, Herschel dust-emission maps, and 2MASS NIR dust-extinction maps. The column-density maps combine the robustness of the 2MASS NIR extinction maps with the resolution and coverage of the Herschel and Planck dust-emission maps and constitute the highest dynamic range column-density maps ever constructed for the entire Orion complex, covering $0.01 \, \mathrm{mag} < A_K < 30 \,\mathrm{mag}$, or $2 \times 10^{20} \, \mathrm{cm}^{-2} < N < 5 \times 10^{23} \,\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$. We determined the ratio of the 2.2 microns extinction coefficient to the 850 microns opacity and found that the values obtained for both Orion A and B are significantly lower than the predictions of standard dust models, but agree with newer models that incorporate icy silicate-graphite conglomerates for the grain population. We show that the cloud projected pdf, over a large range of column densities, can be well fitted by a simple power law. Moreover, we considered the local Schmidt-law for star formation, and confirm earlier results, showing that the protostar surface density $\Sigma_*$ follows a simple law $\Sigma_* \propto \Sigma_{gas}^\beta$, with $\beta \sim 2$.
  • A pressureless scenario for the Dark Matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of a direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being $\ll$c, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the Equation of State (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use the complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at $z=0.44$, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the CLASH survey. The unprecedented high quality of our data-set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most $15\%$ to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, $w=(p_r+2\,p_t)/(3\,c^2\rho)=0.00\pm0.15\mathrm{(stat)}\pm0.08\mathrm{(syst)}$, averaged over the radial range $0.5\,\mathrm{Mpc}\leq$$r$$\leq$$r_{200}$, where $p_r$ and $p_t$ are the radial and tangential pressure, and $\rho$ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing CLASH-VLT program.
  • We present a near-infrared extinction map of a large region ($\sim$870 deg$^2$) covering the isolated Corona Australis complex of molecular clouds. We reach a 1-$\sigma$ error of 0.02 mag in the K-band extinction with a resolution of 3 arcmin over the entire map. We find that the Corona Australis cloud is about three times as large as revealed by previous CO and dust emission surveys. The cloud consists of a 45 pc long complex of filamentary structure from the well known star forming Western-end (the head, $N \geq10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$) to the diffuse Eastern-end the tail, ($N \leq10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$). Remarkably, about two thirds of the complex both in size and mass lie beneath A$_V\sim1$ mag. We find that the PDF of the cloud cannot be described by a single log-normal function. Similar to prior studies, we found a significant excess at high column densities, but a log-normal + power-law tail fit does not work well at low column densities. We show that at low column densities near the peak of the observed PDF, both the amplitude and shape of the PDF are dominated by noise in the extinction measurements making it impractical to derive the intrinsic cloud PDF below A$_K <$ 0.15 mag. Above A$_K \sim 0.15$ mag, essentially the molecular component of the cloud, the PDF appears to be best described by a power-law with index $-3$, but could also described as the tail of a broad and relatively low amplitude, log-normal PDF that peaks at very low column densities.
  • We consider the general problem of fitting a parametric density model to discrete observations, taken to follow a non-homogeneous Poisson point process. This class of models is very common, and can be used to describe many astrophysical processes, including the distribution of protostars in molecular clouds. We give the expression for the likelihood of a given spatial density distribution of protostars and apply it to infer the most probable dependence of the protostellar surface density on the gas surface density. Finally, we apply this general technique to model the distribution of protostars in the Orion molecular cloud and robustly derive the local star formation scaling (Schmidt) law for a molecular cloud. We find that in this cloud the protostellar surface density, $\Sigma_\mathrm{YSO}$, is directly proportional to the square gas column density, here expressed as infrared extinction in the $K$-band, $A_K$: more precisely, $\Sigma_\mathrm{YSO} = (1.65 \pm 0.19) A_K^{(2.03 \pm 0.15)}$ stars pc$^{-2}$.
  • We investigate Schmidt's conjecture (i.e., that the star formation rate scales in a power-law fashion with the gas density) for four well-studied local molecular clouds (GMCs). Using the Bayesian methodology we show that a local Schmidt scaling relation of the form Sigma*(A_K) = kappa x (A_K)^{beta} (protostars pc^{-2}) exists within (but not between) GMCs. Further we find that the Schmidt scaling law, by itself, does not provide an adequate description of star formation activity in GMCs. Because the total number of protostars produced by a cloud is given by the product of Sigma*(A_K) and S'(> A_K), the differential surface area distribution function, integrated over the entire cloud, the cloud's structure plays a fundamental role in setting the level of its star formation activity. For clouds with similar functional forms of Sigma*(A_K), observed differences in their total SFRs are primarily due to the differences in S'(> A_K) between the clouds. The coupling of Sigma*(A_K) with the measured S'(> A_K) in these clouds also produces a steep jump in the SFR and protostellar production above A_K ~ 0.8 magnitudes. Finally, we show that there is no global Schmidt law that relates the star formation rate and gas mass surface densities between GMCs. Consequently, the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt scaling relation for disk galaxies is likely an artifact of unresolved measurements of GMCs and not a result of any underlying physical law of star formation characterizing the molecular gas.
  • The spatial variation of the colour of a galaxy may introduce a bias in the measurement of its shape if the PSF profile depends on wavelength. We study how this bias depends on the properties of the PSF and the galaxies themselves. The bias depends on the scales used to estimate the shape, which may be used to optimise methods to reduce the bias. Here we develop a general approach to quantify the bias. Although applicable to any weak lensing survey, we focus on the implications for the ESA Euclid mission. Based on our study of synthetic galaxies we find that the bias is a few times 10^-3 for a typical galaxy observed by Euclid. Consequently, it cannot be neglected and needs to be accounted for. We demonstrate how one can do so using spatially resolved observations of galaxies in two filters. We show that HST observations in the F606W and F814W filters allow us to model and reduce the bias by an order of magnitude, sufficient to meet Euclid's scientific requirements. The precision of the correction is ultimately determined by the number of galaxies for which spatially-resolved observations in at least two filters are available. We use results from the Millennium Simulation to demonstrate that archival HST data will be sufficient for the tomographic cosmic shear analysis with the Euclid dataset.
  • Despite over 30 years of study, the mass-area relationship within and among clouds is still poorly understood both observationally and theoretically. Modern extinction datasets should have sufficient resolution and dynamic range to characterize this relationship for nearby molecular clouds, although recent papers using extinction data seem to yield different interpretations regarding the nature and universality of this aspect of cloud structure. In this paper we try to unify these various results and interpretations by accounting for the different ways cloud properties are measured and analyzed. We interpret the mass-area relationship in terms of the column density distribution function and its possible variation within and among clouds. We quantitatively characterize regional variations in the column density PDF. We show that structures both within and among clouds possess the same degree of "universality", in that their PDF means do not systematically scale with structure size. Because of this, mass scales linearly with area.
  • Context. The properties of dust grains, in particular their size distribution, are expected to differ from the interstellar medium to the high-density regions within molecular clouds. Since the extinction at near-infrared wavelengths is caused by dust, the extinction law in cores should depart from that found in low-density environments if the dust grains have different properties. Aims. We explore methods to measure the near-infrared extinction law produced by dense material in molecular cloud cores from photometric data. Methods. Using controlled sets of synthetic and semi-synthetic data, we test several methods for linear regression applied to the specific problem of deriving the extinction law from photometric data. We cover the parameter space appropriate to this type of observations. Results. We find that many of the common linear-regression methods produce biased results when applied to the extinction law from photometric colors. We propose and validate a new method, LinES, as the most reliable for this effect. We explore the use of this method to detect whether or not the extinction law of a given reddened population has a break at some value of extinction.
  • In this article I present IEAD, a new interface for astronomical science databases. It is based on a powerful, yet simple, syntax designed to completely abstract the user from the structure of the underlying database. The programming language chosen for its implementation, JavaScript, makes it possible to interact directly with the user and to provide real-time information on the parsing process, error messages, and the name resolution of targets; additionally, the same parsing engine is used for context-sensitive autocompletion. Ultimately, this product should significantly simplify the use of astronomical archives, inspire more advanced uses of them, and allow the user to focus on what scientific research to perform, instead of on how to instruct the computer to do it.
  • In this paper we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by $f_{DG}$, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (non-linear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.
  • We present a near-infrared extinction map of a large region (approximately 2200 deg^2) covering the Orion, the Monoceros R2, the Rosette, and the Canis Major molecular clouds. We used robust and optimal methods to map the dust column density in the near-infrared (NICER and NICEST) towards ~19 million stars of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) point source catalog. Over the relevant regions of the field, we reached a 1-sigma error of 0.03 mag in the K-band extinction with a resolution of 3 arcmin. We measured the cloud distances by comparing the observed density of foreground stars with the prediction of galactic models, thus obtaining d_{Orion A} = (371 +/- 10) pc, d_{Orion B} = (398 +/- 12) pc, $d_{Mon R2} = (905 +/- 37) pc, $d_{Rosette} = (1330 +/- 48) pc, and $d_{CMa} = (1150 +/- 64) pc, values that compare very well with independent estimates.
  • Weak lensing is one of the best available diagnostic tools to measure the total density profiles of distant clusters of galaxies. Unfortunately, it suffers from the well-known mass-sheet degeneracy, so that weak lensing analyses cannot lead to fully reliable determinations of the total mass of the clusters. One possible way to set the relevant scale of the density profile would be to make a direct measurement of the magnification produced by the clusters as gravitational lenses. In this paper we revisit a suggestion made a few years ago for this general purpose, based on the use of the Fundamental Plane as a standard rod for early-type galaxies. Here we move one step further, beyond the simple outline of the idea given earlier, and quantify some statistical properties of this innovative diagnostic tool, with the final goal of identifying clear guidelines for a future observational test on concrete cases, which turns out to be well within the current instrument capabilities. The study is carried out by discussing the statistical properties of Fundamental Plane measurements for a sample of early-type source galaxies behind a massive cluster, for which a weak lensing analysis is assumed to be available. We proceed to study the best strategy to use Fundamental Plane measurements to determine the mass scale of a given cluster and find that the optimal choice is that of a sample of early-type galaxies behind the cluster distributed approximately uniformly in the sky. We also show that substructures do not contribute much to the magnification signal that we are looking for, but only add a modest amount of scatter. We find that for a massive cluster (M > 10^15 M_Sun) located at redshift 0.3 +/- 0.1, a set of about 20 Fundamental Plane measurements, combined with a good weak lensing analysis, should be able to lead to a mass determination with a precision of 20% or better.
  • Lyman-break galaxies are now regularly found in the high redshift Universe by searching for the break in the galaxy spectrum caused by the Lyman-limit redshifted into the optical or even near-IR. At lower redshift, this break is covered by the GALEX UV channels and small samples of z ~ 1 LBGs have been presented in the literature. Here we give results from fitting the spectral energy distributions of a small sub-set of low redshift LBGs and demonstrate the advantage of including photometric points derived from HST ACS slitless grism observations. The results show these galaxies to have very young, star forming populations, while still being massive and dusty. LBGs at low and high redshift show remarkable similarities in their properties, indicating that the LBG selection method picks similar galaxies throughout the Universe.