• Which level of inflation should Central Banks be targeting? We investigate this issue in the context of a simplified Agent Based Model of the economy. Depending on the value of the parameters that describe the behaviour of agents (in particular inflation anticipations), we find a rich variety of behaviour at the macro-level. Without any active monetary policy, our ABM economy can be in a high inflation/high output state, or in a low inflation/low output state. Hyper-inflation, deflation and "business cycles" between coexisting states are also found. We then introduce a Central Bank with a Taylor rule-based inflation target, and study the resulting aggregate variables. Our main result is that too-low inflation targets are in general detrimental to a CB-monitored economy. One symptom is a persistent under-realisation of inflation, perhaps similar to the current macroeconomic situation. Higher inflation targets are found to improve both unemployment and negative interest rate episodes. Our results are compared with the predictions of the standard DSGE model.
  • We analyze the unusual slow dynamics that emerges in the bad metal delocalized phase preceding the Many-Body Localization transition by using single-particle Anderson Localization on the Bethe lattice as a toy model of many-body dynamics in Fock space. We probe the dynamical evolution by measuring observables such as the imbalance and equilibrium correlation functions, which display slow dynamics and power-laws strikingly similar to the ones observed in recent simulations and experiments. We relate this unusual behavior to the non-ergodic spectral statistics found on Bethe lattices. We discuss different scenarii, such as a true intermediate phase which persists in the thermodynamic limit versus a glassy regime established on finite but very large time and length-scales only, and their implications for real space dynamical properties. In the latter, slow dynamics and power-laws extend on a very large time-window but are eventually cut-off on a time-scale that diverges at the MBL transition.
  • In this paper we present a thorough study of transport, spectral and wave-function properties at the Anderson localization critical point in spatial dimensions $d = 3$, $4$, $5$, $6$. Our aim is to analyze the dimensional dependence and to asses the role of the $d\rightarrow \infty$ limit provided by Bethe lattices and tree-like structures. Our results strongly suggest that the upper critical dimension of Anderson localization is infinite. Furthermore, we find that the $d_U=\infty$ is a much better starting point compared to $d_L=2$ to describe even three dimensional systems. We find that critical properties and finite size scaling behavior approach by increasing $d$ the ones found for Bethe lattices: the critical state becomes an insulator characterized by Poisson statistics and corrections to the thermodynamics limit become logarithmic in $N$. In the conclusion, we present physical consequences of our results, propose connections with the non-ergodic delocalised phase suggested for the Anderson model on infinite dimensional lattices and discuss perspectives for future research studies.
  • We study the role of fluctuations on the thermodynamic glassy properties of plaquette spin models, more specifically on the transition involving an overlap order parameter in the presence of an attractive coupling between different replicas of the system. We consider both short-range fluctuations associated with the local environment on Bethe lattices and long-range fluctuations that distinguish Euclidean from Bethe lattices with the same local environment. We find that the phase diagram in the temperature-coupling plane is very sensitive to the former but, at least for the $3$-dimensional (square pyramid) model, appears qualitatively or semi-quantitatively unchanged by the latter. This surprising result suggests that the mean-field theory of glasses provides a reasonable account of the glassy thermodynamics of models otherwise described in terms of the kinetically constrained motion of localized defects and taken as a paradigm for the theory of dynamic facilitation. We discuss the possible implications for the dynamical behavior.
  • We demonstrate the appearance of thermal order by disorder in Ising pyrochlores with staggered antiferromagnetic order frustrated by an applied magnetic field. We use a mean-field cluster variational method, a low-temperature expansion and Monte Carlo simulations to characterise the order-by-disorder transition. By direct evaluation of the density of states we quantitatively show how a symmetry-broken state is selected by thermal excitations. We discuss the relevance of our results to experiments in $2d$ and $3d$ samples, and evaluate how anomalous finite-size effects could be exploited to detect this phenomenon experimentally in two-dimensional artificial systems, or in antiferromagnetic all-in--all-out pyrochlores like Nd$_2$Hf$_2$O$_7$ or Nd$_2$Zr$_2$O$_7$, for the first time.
  • This work provide a thorough study of L\'evy or heavy-tailed random matrices (LM). By analysing the self-consistent equation on the probability distribution of the diagonal elements of the resolvent we establish the equation determining the localisation transition and obtain the phase diagram of LMs. Using arguments based on super-symmetric field theory and Dyson Brownian motion we show that the eigenvalue statistics is the same one of the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble in the whole delocalised phase and is Poisson in the localised phase. Our numerics confirms these findings, valid in the limit of infinitely large LMs, but also reveals that the characteristic scale governing finite size effects diverges much faster than a power law approaching the transition and is already very large far from it. This leads to a very wide cross-over region in which the system looks as if it were in a mixed phase. Our results, together with the ones obtained previously, provide now a complete theory of L\'evy matrices.
  • We extend in a minimal way the stylized model introduced in in "Tipping Points in Macroeconomic Agent Based Models" [JEDC 50, 29-61 (2015)], with the aim of investigating the role and efficacy of monetary policy of a `Central Bank' that sets the interest rate such as to steer the economy towards a prescribed inflation and employment level. Our major finding is that provided its policy is not too aggressive (in a sense detailed in the paper) the Central Bank is successful in achieving its goals. However, the existence of different equilibrium states of the economy, separated by phase boundaries (or "dark corners"), can cause the monetary policy itself to trigger instabilities and be counter-productive. In other words, the Central Bank must navigate in a narrow window: too little is not enough, too much leads to instabilities and wildly oscillating economies. This conclusion strongly contrasts with the prediction of DSGE models.
  • This is a comment on the recent letter by Jack and Garrahan on "Phase transition for quenched coupled replicas in a plaquette spin model of glasses".
  • We revisit the H\'ebraud-Lequeux (HL) model for the rheology of jammed materials and argue that a possibly important time scale is missing from HL's initial specification. We show that our generalization of the HL model undergoes interesting oscillating instabilities for a wide range of parameters, which lead to intermittent, stick-slip flows under constant shear rate. The instability we find is akin to the synchronization transition of coupled elements that arises in many different contexts (neurons, fireflies, financial bankruptcies, etc.). We hope that our scenario could shed light on the commonly observed intermittent, serrated flows of glassy materials under shear.
  • Slow dynamics in glassy systems is often interpreted as due to thermally activated events between "metastable" states. This emphasizes the role of nonperturbative fluctuations, which is especially dramatic when these fluctuations destroy a putative phase transition predicted at the mean-field level. To gain insight into such hard problems, we consider the implementation of a generic back-and-forth process, between microscopic theory and observable behavior via effective theories, in a toy model that is simple enough to allow for a thorough investigation: the one-dimensional $\varphi^4$ theory at low temperature. We consider two ways of restricting the extent of the fluctuations, which both lead to a nonconvex effective potential (or free energy) : either through a finite-size system or by means of a running infrared cutoff within the nonperturbative Renormalization Group formalism. We discuss the physical insight one can get and the ways to treat strongly nonperturbative fluctuations in this context.
  • We propose a simple framework to understand commonly observed crisis waves in macroeconomic Agent Based models, that is also relevant to a variety of other physical or biological situations where synchronization occurs. We compute exactly the phase diagram of the model and the location of the synchronization transition in parameter space. Many modifications and extensions can be studied, confirming that the synchronization transition is extremely robust against various sources of noise or imperfections.
  • The aim of this work is to explore the possible types of phenomena that simple macroeconomic Agent-Based models (ABM) can reproduce. We propose a methodology, inspired by statistical physics, that characterizes a model through its 'phase diagram' in the space of parameters. Our first motivation is to understand the large macro-economic fluctuations observed in the 'Mark I' ABM. Our major finding is the generic existence of a phase transition between a 'good economy' where unemployment is low, and a 'bad economy' where unemployment is high. We introduce a simpler framework that allows us to show that this transition is robust against many modifications of the model, and is generically induced by an asymmetry between the rate of hiring and the rate of firing of the firms. The unemployment level remains small until a tipping point, beyond which the economy suddenly collapses. If the parameters are such that the system is close to this transition, any small fluctuation is amplified as the system jumps between the two equilibria. We have explored several natural extensions of the model. One is to introduce a bankruptcy threshold, limiting the leverage of firms. This leads to a rich phase diagram with, in particular, a region where acute endogenous crises occur, during which the unemployment rate shoots up before the economy can recover. We also introduce simple wage policies. This leads to inflation (in the 'good' phase) or deflation (in the 'bad' phase), but leaves the overall phase diagram of the model essentially unchanged. We have also started exploring the effect of simple monetary policies that attempt to contain rising unemployment and defang crises. We end the paper with general comments on the usefulness of ABMs to model macroeconomic phenomena, in particular in view of the time needed to reach a steady state that raises the issue of ergodicity in these models.
  • We introduce an approach to derive an effective scalar field theory for the glass transition; the fluctuating field is the overlap between equilibrium configurations. We apply it to the case of constrained liquids for which the introduction of a conjugate source to the overlap field was predicted to lead to an equilibrium critical point. We show that the long-distance physics in the vicinity of this critical point is in the same universality class as that of a paradigmatic disordered model: the random-field Ising model. The quenched disorder is provided here by a reference equilibrium liquid configuration. We discuss to what extent this field-theoretical description and the mapping to the random field Ising model hold in the whole supercooled liquid regime, in particular near the glass transition.
  • We use the sixteen vertex model to describe bi-dimensional artificial spin ice (ASI). We find excellent agreement between vertex densities in fifteen differently grown samples and the predictions of the model. Our results demonstrate that the samples are in usual thermal equilibrium away from a critical point separating a disordered and an anti-ferromagnetic phase in the model. The second-order phase transition that we predict suggests that the spatial arrangement of vertices in near-critical ASI should be studied in more detail in order to verify whether they show the expected space and time long-range correlations.
  • We present a thorough study of the static properties of 2D models of spin-ice type on the square lattice or, in other words, the sixteen-vertex model. We use extensive Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase diagram and critical properties of the finite dimensional system. We put forward a suitable mean-field approximation, by defining the model on carefully chosen trees. We employ the cavity (Bethe-Peierls) method to derive self-consistent equations, the fixed points of which yield the equilibrium properties of the model on the tree-like graph. We compare mean-field and finite dimensional results. We discuss our findings in the context of experiments in artificial two dimensional spin ice.
  • We discuss the analytical solution through the cavity method of a mean field model that displays at the same time an ideal glass transition and a set of jamming points. We establish the equations describing this system, and we discuss some approximate analytical solutions and a numerical strategy to solve them exactly. We compare these methods and we get insight into the reliability of the theory for the description of finite dimensional hard spheres.
  • We consider the approach describing glass formation in liquids as a progressive trapping in an exponentially large number of metastable states. To go beyond the mean-field setting, we provide a real-space renormalization group (RG) analysis of the associated replica free-energy functional. The present approximation yields in finite dimensions an ideal glass transition similar to that found in mean field. However, we find that along the RG flow the properties associated with metastable glassy states, such as the configurational entropy, are only defined up to a characteristic length scale that diverges as one approaches the ideal glass transition. The critical exponents characterizing the vicinity of the transition are the usual ones associated with a first-order discontinuity fixed point.
  • We revisit the Anderson localization problem on Bethe lattices, putting in contact various aspects which have been previously only discussed separately. For the case of connectivity 3 we compute by the cavity method the density of states and the evolution of the mobility edge with disorder. Furthermore, we show that below a certain critical value of the disorder the smallest eigenvalue remains delocalized and separated by all the others (localized) ones by a gap. We also study the evolution of the mobility edge at the center of the band with the connectivity, and discuss the large connectivity limit.
  • We study theoretically the non-linear response properties of glass formers. We establish several general results which, together with the assumption of Time-Temperature Superposition, lead to a relation between the non-linear response and the derivative of the linear response with respect to temperature. Using results from Mode-Coupling Theory (MCT) and scaling arguments valid close to the glass transition, we obtain the frequency and temperature dependence of the non-linear response in the $\alpha$ and $\beta$-regimes. Our results demonstrate that supercooled liquids are characterized by responses to external perturbations that become increasingly non-linear as the glass transition is approached. These results are extended to the case of inhomogeneous perturbing fields.
  • The role of geometrical frustration in strongly interacting bosonic systems is studied with a combined numerical and analytical approach. We demonstrate the existence of a novel quantum phase featuring both Bose-Einstein condensation and spin-glass behaviour. The differences between such a phase and the otherwise insulating "Bose glasses" are elucidated.
  • The exact solution of a quantum Bethe lattice model in the thermodynamic limit amounts to solve a functional self-consistent equation. In this paper we obtain this equation for the Bose-Hubbard model on the Bethe lattice, under two equivalent forms. The first one, based on a coherent state path integral, leads in the large connectivity limit to the mean field treatment of Fisher et al. [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 40}, 546 (1989)] at the leading order, and to the bosonic Dynamical Mean Field Theory as a first correction, as recently derived by Byczuk and Vollhardt [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 77}, 235106 (2008)]. We obtain an alternative form of the equation using the occupation number representation, which can be easily solved with an arbitrary numerical precision, for any finite connectivity. We thus compute the transition line between the superfluid and Mott insulator phases of the model, along with thermodynamic observables and the space and imaginary time dependence of correlation functions. The finite connectivity of the Bethe lattice induces a richer physical content with respect to its infinitely connected counterpart: a notion of distance between sites of the lattice is preserved, and the bosons are still weakly mobile in the Mott insulator phase. The Bethe lattice construction can be viewed as an approximation to the finite dimensional version of the model. We show indeed a quantitatively reasonable agreement between our predictions and the results of Quantum Monte Carlo simulations in two and three dimensions.
  • We study a lattice model of attractive colloids. It is exactly solvable on sparse random graphs. As the pressure and temperature are varied it reproduces many characteristic phenomena of liquids, glasses and colloidal systems such as ideal gel formation, liquid-glass phase coexistence, jamming, or the reentrance of the glass transition.
  • This paper provides a short introduction to the group testing problem, and reviews various aspects of its statistical physics formulation. Two main issues are discussed: the optimal design of pools used in a two-stage testing experiment, like the one often used in medical or biological applications, and the inference problem of detecting defective items based on pool diagnosis. The paper is largely based on: M. M\'ezard and C. Toninelli, arXiv:0706.3104, and M. M\'ezard and M. Tarzia {\it Phys. Rev. E} {\bf 76}, 041124 (2007).
  • In this paper we present a detailed analytical study of the phase diagram and of the structural properties of a field theoretic model with a short-range attraction and a competing long-range screened repulsion. We provide a full derivation and expanded discussion and digression on results previously reported briefly in M. Tarzia and A. Coniglio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075702 (2006). The model contains the essential features of the effective interaction potential among charged colloids in polymeric solutions. We employ the self-consistent Hartree approximation and a replica approach, and we show that varying the parameters of the repulsive potential and the temperature yields a phase coexistence, a lamellar and a glassy phase. Our results suggest that the cluster phase observed in charged colloids might be the signature of an underlying equilibrium lamellar phase, hidden on experimental time scales, and emphasize that the formation of microphase structures may play a prominent role in the process of colloidal gelation.
  • We compare the predictions of two different statistical mechanics approaches, corresponding to different physical measurements, proposed to describe binary granular mixtures subjected to some external driving (continuous shaking or tap dynamics). In particular we analytically solve at a mean field level the partition function of a simple hard sphere lattice model under gravity and we focus on the phenomenon of size segregation. We find that the two approaches lead to similar results and seem to coincide in the limit of very low shaking amplitude. However they give different predictions of the crossovers from Brazil nut effect to reverse Brazil nut effect with respect to the shaking amplitude, which could be detected experimentally.