• Merging galaxy clusters produce low Mach number shocks in the intracluster medium. These shocks can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies that are detectable at radio frequencies. MACS J0744.9+3927 is a massive ($M_{500} = (11.8 \pm 2.8) \times 10^{14} M_{\odot}$), high-redshift ($z=0.6976$) cluster where a Bullet-type merger is presumed to have taken place. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich maps from MUSTANG indicate that a shock, with Mach number $\mathcal{M} = 1.0-2.9$ and an extension of $\sim 200$ kpc, sits near the centre of the cluster. The shock is also detected as a brightness and temperature discontinuity in X-ray observations. To search for diffuse radio emission associated with the merger, we have imaged the cluster with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) at 120-165 MHz. Our LOFAR radio images reveal previously undetected AGN emission, but do not show clear cluster-scale diffuse emission in the form of a radio relic nor a radio halo. The region of the shock is on the western edge of AGN lobe emission from the brightest cluster galaxy. Correlating the flux of known shock-induced radio relics versus their size, we find that the radio emission overlapping the shocked region in MACS J0744.9+3927 is likely of AGN origin. We argue against the presence of a relic caused by diffusive shock acceleration and suggest that the shock is too weak to accelerate electrons from the intracluster medium.
  • We simulate the propagation of cosmic rays at ultra-high energies, $\gtrsim 10^{18}$ eV, in models of extragalactic magnetic fields in constrained simulations of the local Universe. We use constrained initial conditions with the cosmological magnetohydrodynamics code {\sc ENZO}. The resulting models of the distribution of magnetic fields in the local Universe are used in the \crpropa code to simulate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We investigate the impact of six different magneto-genesis scenarios, both primordial and astrophysical, on the propagation of cosmic rays over cosmological distances. Moreover, we study the influence of different source distributions around the Milky Way. Our study shows that different scenarios of magneto-genesis do not have a large impact on the anisotropy measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. However, at high energies above the GZK-limit, there is anisotropy caused by the distribution of nearby sources, independent of the magnetic field model. This provides a chance to identify cosmic ray sources with future full-sky measurements and high number statistics at the highest energies. Finally, we compare our results to the dipole signal measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory. All our source models and magnetic field models could reproduce the observed dipole amplitude with a pure iron injection composition. Our results indicate that the dipole is observed due to clustering of secondary nuclei in direction of nearby sources of heavy nuclei. A light injection composition is disfavoured by the non-observation of anisotropy at energies of $4-8 \rm\ EeV$.
  • Feedback by radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) in galaxy groups is not fully understood. Open questions include the duty cycle of the AGN, the spatial extent of the radio lobes, the effect they have on the intragroup medium, and the fate of the cosmic rays. We present the discovery of a 650 kpc-radio galaxy embedded in steep diffuse emission at $z = 0.18793 \pm 5 \times 10^{-5}$ located at the center of the galaxy group MaxBCG J199.31832+51.72503 using an observation from the LOFAR Two-meter Sky Survey (LoTSS) at the central frequency of 144 MHz. Subsequently, we performed a GMRT observation at the central frequency of 607 MHz to study the spectral properties of the source. The observations reveal a radio galaxy with a total radio power $P_{\rm tot, 1.4} \sim 2.1 \times 10^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, exhibiting two asymmetrical jets and lobes. The derived spectral index map shows a steepening toward the inner regions and a steep-spectrum core region. We model the integrated radio spectrum, providing two possible interpretations: the radio source is evolved but still active or it is just at the end of its active phase. Finally, in the same field of view we have discovered Mpc-sized emission surrounding a close pair of AGN located at a redshift $z = 0.0587 \pm 2 \times 10^{-4}$ (SDSS J131544.56+521213.2 and SDSS J131543.99+521055.7) which could be a radio remnant source.
  • Turbulence generated by large-scale motions during structure formation affects the evolution of the thermal and non-thermal components of the intracluster medium. As enstrophy is a measure of the magnitude of vorticity, we study the generation and evolution of turbulence by analysing the Lagrangian history of enstrophy. For this purpose we combine cosmological simulations carried out with the ENZO-code with our Lagrangian post-processing tool CRaTer. This way we are able to quantify the individual source terms of enstrophy in the course of the accretion of groups onto galaxy clusters. Here we focus on the redshift range from $z=1$ to $z=0$. Finally, we measure the rate of dissipation of turbulence and estimate the resulting amplification of intracluster magnetic fields. We find that compressive and baroclinic motions are the main sources of enstrophy, while stretching motions and dissipation affect most of the ensuing enstrophy evolution. The rate of turbulent dissipation is able to sustain the amplification of intracluster magnetic fields to observed levels.
  • In this paper, the second in a series investigating FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies, we use LOFAR and VLA observations between 117 and 456 MHz in addition to archival data to determine the dynamics and energetics of two radio galaxies, 3C452 and 3C223, through fitting of spectral ageing models on small spatial scales. We provide improved measurements for the physical extent of the two sources, including a previously unknown low surface brightness extension to the northern lobe of 3C223, and revised energetics based on these values. We find spectral ages of $77.05^{+9.22}_{-8.74}$ and $84.96^{+15.02}_{-13.83}$ Myr for 3C452 and 3C223 respectively suggesting a characteristic advance speed for the lobes of around one per cent the speed of light. For 3C452 we show that, even for a magnetic field strength not assumed to be in equipartition, a disparity of factor of approximately 2 exists between the spectral age and that determined from a dynamical standpoint. We confirm that the injection index of both sources (as derived from the lobe emission) remains steeper than classically assumed values even when considered on well resolved scales at low frequencies, but find an unexpected sharp discontinuity between the spectrum of the hotspots and the surrounding lobe emission. We suggest that this discrepancy is due to the absorption of hotspot emission and/or non-homogeneous and additional acceleration mechanisms and, as such, hotspots should not be used in the determination of the underlying initial electron energy distribution.
  • On the largest scales, the Universe consists of voids and filaments making up the cosmic web. Galaxy clusters are located at the knots in this web, at the intersection of filaments. Clusters grow through accretion from these large-scale filaments and by mergers with other clusters and groups. In a growing number of galaxy clusters, elongated Mpc-size radio sources have been found, so-called radio relics. These relics are thought to trace relativistic electrons in the intracluster plasma accelerated by low-Mach number collisionless shocks generated by cluster-cluster merger events. A long-standing problem is how low-Mach number shocks can accelerate electrons so efficiently to explain the observed radio relics. Here we report on the discovery of a direct connection between a radio relic and a radio galaxy in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3411-3412. This discovery indicates that fossil relativistic electrons from active galactic nuclei are re-accelerated at cluster shocks. It also implies that radio galaxies play an important role in governing the non-thermal component of the intracluster medium in merging clusters.
  • Observations of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters indicate that cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated on $\sim$Mpc scales. However, protons appear to be accelerated less efficiently since their associated hadronic $\gamma$-ray emission has not yet been detected. Inspired by recent particle-in-cell simulations, we study the cosmic-ray production and its signatures under the hypothesis that the efficiency of shock acceleration depends on the Mach number and on the shock obliquity. For this purpose, we combine ENZO cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with a Lagrangian tracer code to follow the properties of the cosmic rays. Our simulations suggest that the distribution of obliquities in galaxy clusters is random to first order. Quasi-perpendicular shocks are able to accelerate cosmic-ray electrons to the energies needed to produce observable radio emission. However, the $\gamma$-ray emission is lowered by a factor of a few, $\sim$3, if cosmic-ray protons are only accelerated by quasi-parallel shocks, reducing (yet not entirely solving) the tension with the non-detection of hadronic $\gamma$-ray emission by the \textit{Fermi}-satellite.
  • 1) Background: the budget of non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is not well constrained, owing to the observational and theoretical difficulties in studying these diluted plasmas on large scales. 2) Method: we use recent cosmological simulations with complex physics in order to connect the emergence of non-thermal energy to the underlying evolution of gas and dark matter. 3) Results: the impact of non-thermal energy (e.g. cosmic rays, magnetic fields and turbulent motions) is found to increase in the outer region of galaxy clusters. Within numerical and theoretical uncertainties, turbulent motions dominate the budget of non-thermal energy in most of the cosmic volume. 4) Conclusion: assessing the distribution non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is crucial to perform high-precision cosmology in the future. Constraining the level of non-thermal energy in cluster outskirts will improve our understanding of the acceleration of relativistic particles by cosmic shocks and of the origin of extragalactic magnetic fields.
  • Weak shocks in the intracluster medium may accelerate cosmic-ray protons and cosmic-ray electrons differently depending on the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal. In this work, we investigate how shock obliquity affects the production of cosmic rays in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters. For this purpose, we performed a magneto-hydrodynamical simulation of a galaxy cluster using the mesh refinement code \enzo. We use Lagrangian tracers to follow the properties of the thermal gas, the cosmic rays and the magnetic fields over time. We tested a number of different acceleration scenarios by varying the obliquity-dependent acceleration efficiencies of protons and electrons, and by examining the resulting hadronic $\gamma$-ray and radio emission. We find that the radio emission does not change significantly if only quasi-perpendicular shocks are able to accelerate cosmic-ray electrons. Our analysis suggests that radio emitting electrons found in relics have been typically shocked many times before $z=0$. On the other hand, the hadronic $\gamma$-ray emission from clusters is found to decrease significantly if only quasi-parallel shocks are allowed to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. This might reduce the tension with the low upper limits on $\gamma$-ray emission from clusters set by the \textit{Fermi}-satellite.
  • We explore the impact of electron thermal conduction on the evolution of radiatively-cooled cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material, as occur in outflowing galaxies. Performing a parameter study of three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical simulations, we show that electron thermal conduction causes cold clouds to evaporate, but it can also extend their lifetimes by compressing them into dense filaments. We distinguish between low column-density clouds, which are disrupted on very short times, and high-column density clouds with much-longer disruption times that are set by a balance between impinging thermal energy and evaporation. We provide fits to the cloud lifetimes and velocities that can be used in galaxy-scale simulations of outflows, in which the evolution of individual clouds cannot be modeled with the required resolution. Moreover, we show that the clouds are only accelerated to a small fraction of the ambient velocity because compression by evaporation causes the clouds to present a small cross-section to the ambient flow. This means that either magnetic fields must suppress thermal conduction, or that the cold clouds observed in galaxy outflows are not formed of cold material carried out from the galaxy.
  • The galaxy cluster RX J0603.3+4214 at z=0.225 is one of the rarest clusters boasting an extremely large (~2 Mpc) radio-relic. Because of the remarkable morphology of the relic, the cluster is nicknamed "Toothbrush Cluster". Although the cluster's underlying mass distribution is one of the critical pieces of information needed to reconstruct the merger scenario responsible for the puzzling radio-relic morphology, its proximity to the Galactic plane b~10 deg has imposed significant observational challenges. We present a high-resolution weak-lensing study of the cluster with Subaru/Suprime Cam and Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. Our mass reconstruction reveals that the cluster is comprised of complicated dark matter substructures closely tracing the galaxy distribution, however in contrast with the relatively simple binary X-ray morphology. Nevertheless, we find that the cluster mass is still dominated by the two most massive clumps aligned north-south with a ~3:1 mass ratio (M_{200}=6.29_{-1.62}^{+2.24} x 10^{14} Msun and 1.98_{-0.74}^{+1.24} x 10^{14} Msun for the northern and southern clumps, respectively). The southern mass peak is ~2' offset toward the south with respect to the corresponding X-ray peak, which has a "bullet"-like morphology pointing south. Comparison of the current weak-lensing result with the X-ray, galaxy, and radio-relic suggests that perhaps the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed relic may be a high-speed collision of the two most massive subclusters, although the peculiarity of the morphology necessitates involvement of additional sub-clusters. Careful numerical simulations should follow in order to obtain more complete understanding of the merger scenario utilizing all existing observations.
  • The merger of two white dwarfs (WDs) has for many years not been considered as the favoured model for the progenitor system of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). But recent years have seen a change of opinion as a number of studies, both observational and theoretical, have concluded that they should contribute significantly to the observed type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, we study the ignition and propagation of detonation through post-merger remnants and we follow the resulting nucleosynthesis up to the point where a homologous expansion is reached. In our study we cover the entire range of WD masses and compositions. For the emergence of a detonation we study three different setups. The first two are guided by the merger remnants from our earlier simulations (Dan et al. 2014}, while for the third one the ignitions were set by placing hotspots with properties determined by spatially resolved calculations taken from the literature. There are some caveats to our approach which we investigate. We carefully compare the nucleosynthetic yields of successful explosions with SN Ia observations. Only three of our models are consistent with all the imposed constraints and potentially lead to a standard type Ia event. The first one, a $0.45\,M_\odot\ {\rm helium\ (He)} + 0.9 \,M_\odot$ carbon-oxygen (CO) WD system produces a sub-luminous, SN 1991bg-like event while the other two, a $0.45\,M_\odot\ {\rm He} + 1.1\,M_\odot$ oxygen-neon (ONe) WD system and a $1.05+1.05\,M_\odot$ system with two CO WDs, are good candidates for common SNe Ia.
  • Using a new parallel algorithm implemented within the VisIt framework, we analysed large cosmological grid simulations to study the properties of baryons in filaments. The procedure allows us to build large catalogues with up to $\sim 3 \cdot 10^4$ filaments per simulated volume and to investigate the properties of cosmic filaments for very large volumes at high resolution (up to $300^3 ~\rm Mpc^3$ simulated with $2048^3$ cells). We determined scaling relations for the mass, volume, length and temperature of filaments and compared them to those of galaxy clusters. The longest filaments have a total length of about $200 ~\rm Mpc$ with a mass of several $10^{15} M_{\odot}$. We also investigated the effects of different gas physics. Radiative cooling significantly modifies the thermal properties of the warm-hot-intergalactic medium of filaments, mainly by lowering their mean temperature via line cooling. On the other hand, powerful feedback from active galactic nuclei in surrounding halos can heat up the gas in filaments. The impact of shock-accelerated cosmic rays from diffusive shock acceleration on filaments is small and the ratio of between cosmic ray and gas pressure within filaments is of the order of $\sim 10-20$ percent.
  • To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive-mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations have sufficient resolution to accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.
  • Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. (2014) revealed unexpected over-densities of candidate H$\alpha$ emitters near the ~1 Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (~2x10$^{15}$M$_{\odot}$) "Sausage" merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used Keck/DEIMOS and WHT/AF2 to confirm 83 H$\alpha$ emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster sub-cores (away from the shock fronts) show high [SII]6716/[SII]6761 and high [SII]6716/H$\alpha$, implying very low electron densities (<30x lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D~200-300km/s), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster H$\alpha$ AGN. H$\alpha$ star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z~0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (~0.15-0.2 dex) than H$\alpha$ emitters outside the cluster (projected R>2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (~10$^{15}$M$_\odot$) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star-formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myrs.
  • The detection of the diffuse gas component of the cosmic web remains a formidable challenge. In this work we study synchrotron emission from the cosmic web with simulated SKA1 observations, which can represent an fundamental probe of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We investigate radio emission originated by relativistic electrons accelerated by shocks surrounding cosmic filaments, assuming diffusive shock acceleration and as a function of the (unknown) large-scale magnetic fields. The detection of the brightest parts of large ($>10 \rm Mpc$) filaments of the cosmic web should be within reach of the SKA1-LOW, if the magnetic field is at the level of a $\sim 10$ percent equipartition with the thermal gas, corresponding to $\sim 0.1 \mu G$ for the most massive filaments in simulations. In the course of a 2-years survey with SKA1-LOW, this will enable a first detection of the "tip of the iceberg" of the radio cosmic web, and allow for the use of the SKA as a powerful tool to study the origin of cosmic magnetism in large-scale structures. On the other hand, the SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR seem less suited for this science case at low redshift ($z \leq 0.4$), owing to the missing short baselines and the consequent lack of signal from the large-scale brightness fluctuations associated with the filaments. In this case only very long exposures ($\sim 1000$ hr) may enable the detection of $\sim 1-2$ filament for field of view in the SKA1-SUR PAF Band1.
  • CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift ($z\sim0.2$), massive ($\sim2\times10^{15}M_\odot$), post-core passage merging clusters, which host shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star-formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad and narrow band filters and select a sample of $201$ and $463$ line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width ($13${\AA}). We robustly separate between H$\alpha$ and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multi-band (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build H$\alpha$ luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, $1$ Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous ($59$) H$\alpha$ emitters above a star-formation rate (SFR) of $0.17$ M$_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$ surprisingly located in close proximity to the shock fronts, embedded in very hot intra-cluster medium plasma. The SFR density for the cluster population is at least at the level of typical galaxies at $z\sim2$. Down to the same star-formation rate, the possibly dynamically more evolved `Toothbrush' cluster has only $9$ H$\alpha$ galaxies. The cluster H$\alpha$ galaxies fall on the SFR-stellar mass relation $z\sim0.2$ for the field. However, the `Sausage' cluster has an H$\alpha$ emitter density $>20$ times that of blank fields. If the shock passes through gas-rich cluster galaxies, the compressed gas could collapse into dense clouds and excite star-formation for a few $100$ Myr. This process ultimately leads to a rapid consumption of the molecular gas, accelerating the transformation of gas-rich field spirals into cluster S0s or ellipticals.
  • Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (<=500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with LOFAR in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 +- 9 km/s . Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-{\alpha} transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5 sigma detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 0.003 and FWHM of 31 km/s. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.
  • X-ray and radio observations of CIZA J2242.8+5301 suggest that it is a major cluster merger. Despite being well studied in the X-ray, and radio, little has been presented on the cluster structure and dynamics inferred from its galaxy population. We carried out a deep (i<25) broad band imaging survey of the system with Subaru SuprimeCam (g & i bands) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (r band) as well as a comprehensive spectroscopic survey of the cluster area (505 redshifts) using Keck DEIMOS. We use this data to perform a comprehensive galaxy/redshift analysis of the system, which is the first step to a proper understanding the geometry and dynamics of the merger, as well as using the merger to constrain self-interacting dark matter. We find that the system is dominated by two subclusters of comparable richness with a projected separation of 6.9'^{+0.7}_{-0.5} (1.3^{+0.13}_{-0.10} Mpc). We find that the north and south subclusters have similar redshifts of z=0.188 with a relative line-of-sight velocity difference of 69+/-190 km/s. We also find that north and south subclusters have velocity dispersions of 1160^{+100}_{-90} km/s and 1080^{+100}_{-70} km/s, respectively. These correspond to masses of 16.1^{+4.6}_{-3.3}x10^14 M_sun and 13.0^{+4.0}_{-2.5}x10^14 M_sun, respectively. While velocity dispersion measurements of merging clusters can be biased we believe the bias in this system to be minor due to the large projected separation and nearly plane-of-sky merger configuration. CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a relatively clean dissociative cluster merger with near 1:1 mass ratio, which makes it an ideal merger for studying merger associated physical phenomena.
  • CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a merging system with a prominent (~2 Mpc long) radio relic, which together with the morphology of the X-ray emission provides strong evidence for a violent collision along the N-S axis. We present our constraints on the dark matter distribution of this unusual system using Subaru and CFHT imaging data. Measuring a high S/N lensing signal from this cluster is potentially a challenging task because of its proximity to the Milky Way plane (|b|~5 deg). We overcome this challenge with careful observation planning and systematics control, which enables us to successfully map the dark matter distribution of the cluster with high fidelity. The resulting mass map shows that the mass distribution is highly elongated along the N-S merger axis inferred from the orientation of the radio relics. Based on our mass reconstruction, we identify two sub-clusters, which coincide with the cluster galaxy distributions. We determine their masses using MCMC analysis by simultaneously fitting two NFW halos without fixing their centroids. The resulting masses of the northern and southern systems are $M_{200}=11.0_{-3.2}^{+3.7}\times10^{14} M_{\sun}$ and $9.8_{-2.5}^{+3.8}\times10^{14} M_{\sun}$, respectively, indicating that we are witnessing a post-collision of two giant systems of nearly equal mass. When the mass and galaxy centroids are compared in detail, we detect ~ 1' (~190 kpc) offsets in both northern and southern sub-clusters. We find that the galaxy luminosity-mass offset for the northern clump is statistically significant at the ~2 sigma level whereas the detection is only marginal for the southern sub-cluster in part because of a relatively large mass centroid error. We conclude that it is yet premature to uniquely attribute the galaxy-mass misalignment to SIDM and discuss caveats.
  • The CIZA J2242.8+5301 cluster hosts an extraordinary, narrow, Mpc-wide, diffuse patch of radio emission tracing travelling shock waves, called a relic. We perform a multi-wavelength of observations of the cluster. We discover radio spectral steepening and increasing spectral curvature in the shock downstream area, indicative of emission produced by spectrally-aged electrons, following a JP ageing model. The curved integrated spectrum towards $16$ GHz challenges the favoured relic formation model. Further, we find a boosting the number density of H$\alpha$ emitters by a factor of $10$, possibly caused by interactions of the galaxies with the shock wave.
  • Observations have revealed cold gas with large velocity dispersions (~300 km/s) within the hot outflows of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). This gas may trace its origin to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) fragmentation of a super-bubble or may arise on smaller scales. We model a ULIRG outflow at two scales to recreate this gas in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using FLASH. Although resolution is limited, these models successfully produce cold gas in outflows with large velocity dispersions. Our small-scale models produce this cold gas through RT fragmentation of the super-bubble wall, but the large-scale models produce the cold gas after hot bubbles fragment the disc's gas into cold clouds which are then accelerated by thermal pressure, and supplemented by cooling within the outflow. We produce simple mock spectra to compare these simulations to observed absorption spectra and find line-widths of ~250 km/s, agreeing with the lower end of observations.
  • Non-thermal (relativistic) particles are injected into the cosmos by structure formation shock waves, active galactic nuclei and stellar explosions. We present a suite of unigrid cosmological simulations (up to $2048^3$) using a two-fluid model in the grid code ENZO. The simulations include the dynamical effects of cosmic-ray (CR) protons and cover a range of theoretically motivated acceleration efficiencies. For the bulk of the cosmic volume the modelling of CR processes is rather stable with respect to resolution, provided that a minimum (cell) resolution of $\approx 100 ~\rm kpc/h$ is employed. However, the results for the innermost cluster regions depend on the assumptions for the baryonic physics. Inside clusters, non-radiative runs at high resolution tend to produce an energy density of CRs that are below available upper limits from the FERMI satellite, while the radiative runs are found to produce a higher budget of CRs. We show that weak ($M \leq 3-5$) shocks and shock-reacceleration are crucial to set the level of CRs in the innermost region of clusters, while in the outer regions the level of CR energy is mainly set via direct injection by stronger shocks, and is less sensitive to cooling and feedback from active galactic nuclei and supernovae.
  • (Abridged)One of the fundamental challenges for astrophysics in the 21st century is finding a way to untangle the physical processes that govern galaxy formation and evolution. Given the importance and scope of this problem, the multi-wavelength astronomical community has used the past decade to build up a wealth of information over specific extragalactic deep fields to address key questions in galaxy formation and evolution. These fields generally cover at least 10square degrees to facilitate the investigation of the rarest, typically most massive, galaxies and AGN. Furthermore, such areal coverage allows the environments to be fully accounted for, thereby linking the single halo to the two-halo terms in the halo occupation distribution. Surveys at radio wavelengths have begun to lag behind those at other wavelengths, especially in this medium-deep survey tier. However, the survey speed offered by the JVLA means that we can now reach a point where we can begin to obtain commensurate data at radio wavelengths to those which already exists from the X-ray through to the far-infrared over ~10 square degrees. We therefore present the case for a 10 square degree survey to 1.5uJy at L-band in A or B Array, requiring ~4000 hours to provide census of star-formation and AGN-accretion activity in the Universe. For example, the observations will allow galaxies forming stars at 10Msolar/yr to be detected out to z~1 and luminous infrared galaxies (1000Msolar/yr to be found out to z~6. Furthermore, the survey area ensures that we will have enough cosmic volume to find these rare sources at all epochs. The bandwidth will allow us to determine the polarisation properties galaxies in the high-redshift Universe as a function of stellar mass, morphology and redshift.
  • We studied the intracluster medium of the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 using deep XMM-Newton observations. The cluster hosts a remarkable 2-Mpc long, ~50-kpc wide radio relic that has been nicknamed the "Sausage". A smaller, more irregular counter-relic is also present, along with a faint giant radio halo. We analysed the distribution of the ICM physical properties, and searched for shocks by trying to identify density and temperature discontinuities. East of the southern relic, we find evidence of shock compression corresponding to a Mach number of 1.3, and speculate that the shock extends beyond the length of the radio structure. The ICM temperature increases at the northern relic. More puzzling, we find a "wall" of hot gas east of the cluster centre. A partial elliptical ring of hot plasma appears to be present around the merger. While radio observations and numerical simulations predict a simple merger geometry, the X-ray results point towards a more complex merger scenario.