• Beginning with addition and multiplication which are intrinsic to a Koch-type curve, I formulate and solve a wave equation that describes wave propagation along a fractal coastline. As opposed to the examples known from the literature I do not replace the fractal by the continuum in which it is embedded. This seems to be the first example of a truly intrinsic description of wave propagation along a fractal curve.
  • Non-Newtonian calculus that starts with elementary non-Diophantine arithmetic operations of a Burgin type is applicable to all fractals whose cardinality is continuum. The resulting definitions of derivatives and integrals are simpler from what one finds in the more traditional literature of the subject, and they often work in the cases where the standard methods fail. As an illustration, we perform a Fourier transform of a real-valued function with Sierpi\'nski-set domain. The resulting formalism is as simple as the usual undergraduate calculus.
  • I give a simple example of a local realistic problem with free will of observers and no detection loophole, but where the Bell inequality cannot be proved. The trick is based on random variables modeled by functions whose sum does not exist due to incompatibility of their domains.
  • Arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), as well as the calculus they imply, are non-unique. The examples of four-dimensional spaces, $\mathbb{R}_+^4$ and $(-L/2,L/2)^4$, are considered where different types of arithmetic and calculus coexist simultaneously. In all the examples there exists a non-Diophantine arithmetic that makes the space globally Minkowskian, and thus the laws of physics are formulated in terms of the corresponding calculus. However, when one switches to the `natural' Diophantine arithmetic and calculus, the Minkowskian character of the space is lost and what one effectively obtains is a Lorentzian manifold. I discuss in more detail the problem of electromagnetic fields produced by a pointlike charge. The solution has the standard form when expressed in terms of the non-Diophantine formalism. When the `natural' formalsm is used, the same solution looks as if the fields were created by a charge located in an expanding universe, with nontrivially accelerating expansion. The effect is clearly visible also in solutions of the Friedman equation with vanishing cosmological constant. All of this suggests that phenomena attributed to dark energy may be a manifestation of a miss-match between the arithmetic employed in mathematical modeling, and the one occurring at the level of natural laws. Arithmetic is as physical as geometry.
  • Fractals equipped with intrinsic arithmetic lead to a natural definition of differentiation, integration and complex numbers. Applying the formalism to the problem of a Fourier transform on fractals we show that the resulting transform has all the expected basic properties. As an example we discuss a sawtooth signal on the ternary middle-third Cantor set. The formalism works also for fractals that are not self-similar.
  • Fechner's law and its modern generalizations can be regarded as manifestations of alternative forms of arithmetic, coexisting at stimulus and sensation levels. The world of sensations may be thus described by a generalization of the standard mathematical calculus.
  • Fractals such as the Cantor set can be equipped with intrinsic arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) that map the fractal into itself. The arithmetics allows one to define calculus and algebra intrinsic to the fractal in question, and one can formulate classical and quantum physics within the fractal set. In particular, fractals in space-time can be generated by means of homogeneous spaces associated with appropriate Lie groups. The construction is illustrated by explicit examples.
  • Wavepackets in quantum mechanics spread and the Universe in cosmology expands. We discuss a formalism where the two effects can be unified. The basic assumption is that the Universe is determined by a unitarily evolving wavepacket defined on space-time. Space-time is static but the Universe is dynamic. Spreading analogous to expansion known from observational cosmology is obtained if one regards time evolution as a discrete process with probabilities of jumps determined by a variational principle employing Kolmogorov-Nagumo-R\'enyi averages. The choice of the R\'enyi calculus implies that the form of the Universe involves an implicit fractal structure. The formalism automatically leads to two types of "time" parameters: $\tau$, with dimension of $x^0$, and dimensionless $\varepsilon=\ln \epsilon_\tau$, related to the form of diffeomorphism that defines the dynamics. There is no preferred time foliation, but effectively the dynamics leads to asymptotic concentration of the Universe on spacelike surfaces that propagate in space-time. The analysis is performed explicitly in $1+1$ dimensions, but the unitary evolution operator is brought to a form that makes generalizations to other dimensions and other fields quite natural.
  • Arithmetic operations can be defined in various ways, even if one assumes commutativity and associativity of addition and multiplication, and distributivity of multiplication with respect to addition. In consequence, whenever one encounters `plus' or `times' one has certain freedom of interpreting this operation. This leads to some freedom in definitions of derivatives, integrals and, thus, practically all equations occurring in natural sciences. A change of realization of arithmetic, without altering the remaining structures of a given equation, plays the same role as a symmetry transformation. An appropriate construction of arithmetic turns out to be particularly important for dynamical systems in fractal space-times. Simple examples from classical and quantum, relativistic and nonrelativistic physics are discussed, including the eigenvalue problem for a quantum harmonic oscillator. It is explained why the change of arithmetic is not equivalent to the usual change of variables, and why it may have implications for the Bell theorem.
  • Almost two decades of research on applications of the mathematical formalism of quantum theory as a modeling tool in domains different from the micro-world has given rise to many successful applications in situations related to human behavior and thought, more specifically in cognitive processes of decision-making and the ways concepts are combined into sentences. In this article, we extend this approach to animal behavior, showing that an analysis of an interactive situation involving a mating competition between certain lizard morphs allows to identify a quantum theoretic structure. More in particular, we show that when this lizard competition is analyzed structurally in the light of a compound entity consisting of subentities, the contextuality provided by the presence of an underlying rock-paper-scissors cyclic dynamics leads to a violation of Bell's inequality, which means it is of a non-classical type. We work out an explicit quantum-mechanical representation in Hilbert space for the lizard situation and show that it faithfully models a set of experimental data collected on three throat-colored morphs of a specific lizard species. Furthermore, we investigate the Hilbert space modeling, and show that the states describing the lizard competitions contain entanglement for each one of the considered confrontations of lizards with different competing strategies, which renders it no longer possible to interpret these states of the competing lizards as compositions of states of the individual lizards.
  • Soliton rate equations are based on non-Kolmogorovian models of probability and naturally include autocatalytic processes. The formalism is not widely known but has great unexplored potential for applications to systems interacting with environments. Beginning with links of contextuality to non-Kolmogorovity we introduce the general formalism of soliton rate equations and work out explicit examples of subsystems interacting with environments. Of particular interest is the case of a soliton autocatalytic rate equation coupled to a linear conservative environment, a formal way of expressing seasonal changes. Depending on strength of the system-environment coupling we observe phenomena analogous to hibernation or even complete blocking of decay of a population.
  • This is the current form of lecture notes on my approach to field quantization. I explain on a simple scalar-field model the physical motivation and show some preliminary applications (field produced by a pointlike charge, the vacuum-to-vacuum loop diagram, the Casimir presure). The approach is based on an appropriate construction of a representation of harmonic-oscillator Lie algebra and a sequential definition of Dirac deltas.
  • Darwinism conceives evolution as a consequence of random variation and natural selection, hence it is based on a materialistic, i.e. matter-based, view of science inspired by classical physics. But matter in itself is considered a very complex notion in modern physics. More specifically, at a microscopic level, matter and energy are no longer retained within their simple form, and quantum mechanical models are proposed wherein potential form is considered in addition to actual form. In this paper we propose an alternative to standard Neodarwinian evolution theory. We suggest that the starting point of evolution theory cannot be limited to actual variation whereupon is selected, but to variation in the potential of entities according to the context. We therefore develop a formalism, referred to as Context driven Actualization of Potential (CAP), which handles potentiality and describes the evolution of entities as an actualization of potential through a reiterated interaction with the context. As in quantum mechanics, lack of knowledge of the entity, its context, or the interaction between context and entity leads to different forms of indeterminism in relation to the state of the entity. This indeterminism generates a non-Kolmogorovian distribution of probabilities that is different from the classical distribution of chance described by Darwinian evolution theory, which stems from a 'actuality focused', i.e. materialistic, view of nature. We also present a quantum evolution game that highlights the main differences arising from our new perspective and shows that it is more fundamental to consider evolution in general, and biological evolution in specific, as a process of actualization of potential induced by context, for which its material reduction is only a special case.
  • Comparison of theory of Rabi oscillations with experiment [M. Wilczewski and M. Czachor, Phys. Rev. A {\bf 79}, 033836 (2009)] suggests that cavity lifetime parameters obtained in measurements with many photons may be much smaller than those applicable to almost vacuum states of light. In this context we show that the conclusion remains unchanged even if one takes a more realistic description of the initial state of light in cavity.
  • The mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics has been successfully employed in the last years to model situations in which the use of classical structures gives rise to problematical situations, and where typically quantum effects, such as 'contextuality' and 'entanglement', have been recognized. This 'Quantum Interaction Approach' is briefly reviewed in this paper focusing, in particular, on the quantum models that have been elaborated to describe how concepts combine in cognitive science, and on the ensuing identification of a quantum structure in human thought. We point out that these results provide interesting insights toward the development of a unified theory for meaning and knowledge formalization and representation. Then, we analyze the technological aspects and implications of our approach, and a particular attention is devoted to the connections with symbolic artificial intelligence, quantum computation and robotics.
  • The expected utility hypothesis is one of the building blocks of classical economic theory and founded on Savage's Sure-Thing Principle. It has been put forward, e.g. by situations such as the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes, that real-life situations can violate Savage's Sure-Thing Principle and hence also expected utility. We analyze how this violation is connected to the presence of the 'disjunction effect' of decision theory and use our earlier study of this effect in concept theory to put forward an explanation of the violation of Savage's Sure-Thing Principle, namely the presence of 'quantum conceptual thought' next to 'classical logical thought' within a double layer structure of human thought during the decision process. Quantum conceptual thought can be modeled mathematically by the quantum mechanical formalism, which we illustrate by modeling the Hawaii problem situation, a well-known example of the disjunction effect, and we show how the dynamics in the Hawaii problem situation is generated by the whole conceptual landscape surrounding the decision situation.
  • We identify the presence of Pet-Fish problem situations and the corresponding Guppy effect of concept theory on the World-Wide Web. For this purpose, we introduce absolute weights for words expressing concepts and relative weights between words expressing concepts, and the notion of 'meaning bound' between two words expressing concepts, making explicit use of the conceptual structure of the World-Wide Web. The Pet-Fish problem occurs whenever there are exemplars - in the case of Pet and Fish these can be Guppy or Goldfish - for which the meaning bound with respect to the conjunction is stronger than the meaning bounds with respect to the individual concepts.
  • The first part of the paper reviews applications of 2-spinor methods to relativistic qubits (analogies between tetrads in Minkowski space and 2-qubit states, qubits defined by means of null directions and their role for elimination of the Peres-Scudo-Terno phenomenon, advantages and disadvantages of relativistic polarization operators defined by the Pauli-Lubanski vector, manifestly covariant approach to unitary representations of inhomogeneous SL(2,C)). The second part deals with electromagnetic fields quantized by means of harmonic oscillator Lie algebras (not necessarily taken in irreducible representations). As opposed to non-relativistic singlets one has to distinguish between maximally symmetric and EPR states. The distinction is one of the sources of `strange' relativistic properties of EPR correlations. As an example, EPR averages are explicitly computed for linear polarizations in states that are antisymmetric in both helicities and momenta. The result takes the familiar form $\pm p\cos 2(\alpha-\beta)$ independently of the choice of representation of harmonic oscillator algebra. Parameter $p$ is determined by spectral properties of detectors and the choice of EPR state, but is unrelated to detector efficiencies. Brief analysis of entanglement with vacuum and vacuum violation of Bell's inequality is given. The effects are related to inequivalent notions of vacuum states. Technical appendices discuss details of the representation I employ in field quantization. In particular, M-shaped delta-sequences are used to define Dirac deltas regular at zero.
  • The 1996 Brune {\it et al.} experiment on vacuum Rabi oscillation is analyzed by means of alternative models of atom-reservoir interaction. Agreement with experimental Rabi oscillation data can be obtained if one defines jump operators in the dressed-state basis, and takes into account thermal fluctuations between dressed states belonging to the same manifold. Such low-frequency transitions could be ignored in a closed cavity, but the cavity employed in the experiment was open, which justifies our assumption. The cavity quality factor corresponding to the data is $Q=3.31\cdot 10^{10}$, whereas $Q$ reported in the experiment was $Q=7\cdot 10^7$. The rate of decoherence arising from opening of the cavity can be of the same order as an analogous correction coming from finite time resolution $\Delta t$ (formally equivalent to collisional decoherence). Peres-Horodecki separability criterion shows that the rate at which the atom-field state approaches a separable state is controlled by fluctuations between dressed states from the same manifold, and not by the rate of transitions towards the ground state. In consequence, improving the $Q$ factor we do not improve the coherence properties of the cavity.
  • The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in Part I [Phys. Rev. A {\bf 79}, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in Part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter $\varsigma$, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit $\varsigma\to\infty$. Observation of a finite $\varsigma$ would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a finite-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are non-unique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune {\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf{76}}, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any $\varsigma>400$.
  • Electromagnetic fields are quantized in manifestly covariant way by means of a class of reducible representations of CCR. $A_a(x)$ transforms as a Hermitian four-vector field in Minkowski four-position space (no change of gauge), but in momentum space it splits into spin-1 massless photons (optics) and two massless scalars (similar to dark matter). Unitary dynamics is given by point-form interaction picture, with minimal-coupling Hamiltonian constructed from fields that are free on the null-cone boundary of the Milne universe. SL(2,C) transformations and dynamics are represented unitarily in positive-norm Hilbert space describing $N$ four-dimensional oscillators. Vacuum is a Bose-Einstein condensate of the $N$-oscillator gas. Both the form of $A_a(x)$ and its transformation properties are determined by an analogue of the twistor equation. The same equation guarantees that the subspace of vacuum states is, as a whole, Poincar\'e invariant. The formalism is tested on quantum fields produced by pointlike classical sources. Photon statistics is well defined even for pointlike charges, with UV/IR regularizations occurring automatically as a consequence of the formalism. The probabilities are not Poissonian but of a R\'enyi type with $\alpha=1-1/N$. The average number of photons occurring in Bremsstrahlung splits into two parts: The one due to acceleration, and the one that remains nonzero even if motion is inertial. Classical Maxwell electrodynamics is reconstructed from coherent-state averaged solutions of Heisenberg equations. Static pointlike charges polarize vacuum and produce effective charge densities and fields whose form is sensitive to both the choice of representation of CCR and the corresponding vacuum state.
  • Simplest quantum teleportation algorithms can be represented in geometric terms in spaces of dimensions 3 (for real state-vectors) and 4 (for complex state-vectors). The geometric representation is based on geometric-algebra coding, a geometric alternative to the tensor-product coding typical of quantum mechanics. We discuss all the elementary ingredients of the geometric version of the algorithm: Geometric analogs of states and controlled Pauli gates. Fully geometric presentation is possible if one employs a nonstandard representation of directed magnitudes, formulated in terms of colors defined via stereographic projection of a color wheel, and not by means of directed volumes.
  • Formal similarity between Minkowski tetrads and Bell bases allows to think of metric tensors in terms of quantum teleportation protocols. The role of null tetrads for quantum information processing is different. They define qubits resistant to a special kind of noise that occurs if coding and decoding of quantum information is performed in different reference frames. These examples show that mutual links between quantum information and the 2-spinor calculus may be nontrivial and worthy of further studies.
  • Holographic reduced representations (HRR) are based on superpositions of convolution-bound $n$-tuples, but the $n$-tuples cannot be regarded as vectors since the formalism is basis dependent. This is why HRR cannot be associated with geometric structures. Replacing convolutions by geometric products one arrives at reduced representations analogous to HRR but interpretable in terms of geometry. Variable bindings occurring in both HRR and its geometric analogue mathematically correspond to two different representations of $Z_2\times...\times Z_2$ (the additive group of binary $n$-tuples with addition modulo 2). As opposed to standard HRR, variable binding performed by means of geometric product allows for computing exact inverses of all nonzero vectors, a procedure even simpler than approximate inverses employed in HRR. The formal structure of the new reduced representation is analogous to cartoon computation, a geometric analogue of quantum computation.
  • Quantum computation is based on tensor products and entangled states. We discuss an alternative to the quantum framework where tensor products are replaced by geometric products and entangled states by multivectors. The resulting theory is analogous to quantum computation but does not involve quantum mechanics. We discuss in detail similarities and differences between the two approaches and illustrate the formulas by explicit geometric objects where multivector versions of the Bell-basis, GHZ, and Hadamard states are visualized by means of colored oriented polylines.