• We propose a new superresolution imaging technique for interferometry using sparse modeling, utilizing two regularization terms: the $\ell_1$-norm and a new function named Total Squared Variation (TSV) of the brightness distribution. TSV is an edge-smoothing variant of Total Variation (TV), leading to reducing the sum of squared gradients. First, we demonstrate that our technique may achieve super-resolution of $\sim 30$% compared to the traditional CLEAN beam size using synthetic observations of two point sources. Second, we present simulated observations of three physically motivated static models of Sgr A* with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) to show the performance of proposed techniques in greater detail. We find that $\ell_1$+TSV regularization outperforms $\ell_1$+TV regularization with the popular isotropic TV term and the Cotton-Schwab CLEAN algorithm, demonstrating that TSV is well-matched to the expected physical properties of the astronomical images, which are often nebulous. Remarkably, in both the image and gradient domains, the optimal beam size minimizing root-mean-squared errors is $\lesssim 10$% of the traditional CLEAN beam size for $\ell_1$+TSV regularization, and non-convolved reconstructed images have smaller errors than beam-convolved reconstructed images. This indicates that the traditional post-processing technique of Gaussian convolution in interferometric imaging may not be required for the $\ell_1$+TSV regularization. We also propose a feature extraction method to detect circular features from the image of a black hole shadow with the circle Hough transform (CHT) and use it to evaluate the performance of the image reconstruction. With our imaging technique and the CHT, the EHT can constrain the radius of the black hole shadow with an accuracy of $\sim 10-20$% in present simulations for Sgr A*.
  • We report on interferometric observations of a face-on accretion system around the High-Mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. The innermost accretion system of 100 au radius was resolved in a 45 GHz continuum image taken with the Jansky-Very Large Array. Our spectral energy distribution analysis indicated that the continuum could be explained by optically thick dust emission. The total mass of the dusty system is $\sim$ 0.2 $M_{\sun}$ at minimum and up to a few $M_{\sun}$ depending on the dust parameters. 6.7 GHz CH$_{3}$OH masers associated with the same system were also observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The masers showed a spiral-like, non-axisymmetric distribution with a systematic velocity gradient. The line-of-sight velocity field is explained by an infall motion along a parabolic streamline that falls onto the equatorial plane of the face-on system. The streamline is quasi-radial and reaches the equatorial plane at a radius of 16 au. This is clearly smaller than that of typical accretion disks in High-Mass star formation, indicating that the initial angular momentum was very small, or the CH$_{3}$OH masers selectively trace accreting material that has small angular momentum. In the former case, the initial specific angular momentum is estimated to be 8 $\times$ 10$^{20}$ ($M_{*}$$/$10 $M_{\sun}$)$^{0.5}$ cm$^{2}$ s$^{-1}$, or a significant fraction of the initial angular momentum was removed outside of 100 au. The physical origin of such a streamline is still an open question and will be constrained by the higher-resolution ($\sim$ 10 mas) thermal continuum and line observations with ALMA long baselines.
  • The FOREST Unbiased Galactic plane Imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (FUGIN) project is one of the legacy projects using the new multi-beam FOREST receiver installed on the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. This project aims to investigate the distribution, kinematics, and physical properties of both diffuse and dense molecular gas in the Galaxy at once by observing 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=1-0 lines simultaneously. The mapping regions are a part of the 1st quadrant (10d < l < 50d, |b| < 1d) and the 3rd quadrant (198d < l <236d, |b| < 1d) of the Galaxy, where spiral arms, bar structure, and the molecular gas ring are included. This survey achieves the highest angular resolution to date (~20") for the Galactic plane survey in the CO J=1-0 lines, which makes it possible to find dense clumps located farther away than the previous surveys. FUGIN will provide us with an invaluable dataset for investigating the physics of the galactic interstellar medium (ISM), particularly the evolution of interstellar gas covering galactic scale structures to the internal structures of giant molecular clouds, such as small filament/clump/core. We present an overview of the FUGIN project, observation plan, and initial results, which reveal wide-field and detailed structures of molecular clouds, such as entangled filaments that have not been obvious in previous surveys, and large-scale kinematics of molecular gas such as spiral arms.
  • We report the initial results of our high-cadence monitoring program on the radio jet in the active galaxy M87, obtained by the KVN and VERA Array (KaVA) at 22 GHz. This is a pilot study that preceded a larger KaVA-M87 monitoring program, which is currently ongoing. The pilot monitoring was mostly performed every two to three weeks from December 2013 to June 2014, at a recording rate of 1 Gbps, obtaining the data for a total of 10 epochs. We successfully obtained a sequence of good quality radio maps that revealed the rich structure of this jet from <~1 mas to 20 mas, corresponding to physical scales (projected) of ~0.1-2 pc (or ~140-2800 Schwarzschild radii). We detected superluminal motions at these scales, together with a trend of gradual acceleration. The first evidence for such fast motions and acceleration near the jet base were obtained from recent VLBA studies at 43 GHz, and the fact that very similar kinematics are seen at a different frequency and time with a different instrument suggests these properties are fundamental characteristics of this jet. This pilot program demonstrates that KaVA is a powerful VLBI array for studying the detailed structural evolution of the M87 jet and also other relativistic jets.
  • From measuring the annual parallax of water masers over one and a half years with VERA, we present the trigonometric parallax and corresponding distance of another newly identified water maser source in the region of IRAS 20231+3440 as $\pi=0.611\pm0.022$ mas and $D=1.64\pm0.06$ kpc respectively. We measured the absolute proper motions of all the newly detected maser spots (30 spots) and presented two pictures describing the possible spatial distribution of the water maser as the morphology marks out an arc of masers whose average proper motion velocity in the jet direction was 14.26 km s$^{-1}$. As revealed by the ALLWISE composite image, and by applying the colour-colour method of YSO identification and classification on photometric archived data, we identified the driving source of the north maser group to be a class I, young stellar object. To further probe the nature of the progenitor, we used the momentum rate maximum value (1.2$\times$10$^{-4}$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ km s$^{-1}$) of the outflow to satisfy that the progenitor under investigation is a low mass young stellar object concurrently forming alongside an intermediate-mass YSO $\sim 60,000$ au ($\sim 37$ arcsecs) away from it.
  • We detected flaring flux variability that regularly occurred with the period of 23.9 days on a 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission at Vlsr = 25.30 km/s in G 014.23-00.50 through highly frequent monitoring using the Hitachi 32-m radio telescope. By analyzing data from 05 January 2013 to 21 January 2016, the periodic variability has persisted in at least 47 cycles, corresponding to approximately 1,100 days. The period of 23.9 days is the shortest one observed in masers at around high-mass young stellar objects so far. The flaring component normally falls below the detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.9 Jy. In the flaring periods, the component rises above the detection limit with the ratio of the peak flux density more than 180 in comparison with a quiescent phase, showing intermittent periodic variability. The time-scale of the flux rise was typically two days or shorter, and both symmetric and asymmetric profiles of flux variability were observed through intraday monitoring. These characteristics might be explained by a change in the flux of seed photons by a colliding-wind binary (CWB) system or a variation of the dust temperature by an extra heating source of a shock formed by the CWB system within a gap region in a circumbinary disk, in which the orbital semi-major axes of the binary are 0.26-0.34 au.
  • We propose a new technique for radio interferometry to obtain super-resolution full polarization images in all four Stokes parameters using sparse modeling. The proposed technique reconstructs the image in each Stokes parameter from the corresponding full-complex Stokes visibilities by utilizing two regularization functions: the $\ell _1$-norm and total variation (TV) of the brightness distribution. As an application of this technique, we present simulated linear polarization observations of two physically motivated models of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We confirm that $\ell _1$+TV regularization can achieve an optimal resolution of $\sim 25-30$\% of the diffraction limit $\lambda/D_{\rm max}$, which is the nominal spatial resolution of a radio interferometer for both the total intensity (i.e. Stokes $I$) and linear polarizations (i.e. Stokes $Q$ and $U$). This optimal resolution is better than that obtained from the widely used Cotton-Schwab CLEAN algorithm or from using $\ell _1$ or TV regularizations alone. Furthermore, we find that $\ell _1$+TV regularization can achieve much better image fidelity in linear polarization than other techniques over a wide range of spatial scales, not only in the super-resolution regime, but also on scales larger than the diffraction limit. Our results clearly demonstrate that sparse reconstruction is a useful choice for high-fidelity full-polarimetric interferometric imaging.
  • We propose a new imaging technique for radio and optical/infrared interferometry. The proposed technique reconstructs the image from the visibility amplitude and closure phase, which are standard data products of short-millimeter very long baseline interferometers such as the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and optical/infrared interferometers, by utilizing two regularization functions: the $\ell_1$-norm and total variation (TV) of the brightness distribution. In the proposed method, optimal regularization parameters, which represent the sparseness and effective spatial resolution of the image, are derived from data themselves using cross validation (CV). As an application of this technique, we present simulated observations of M87 with the EHT based on four physically motivated models. We confirm that $\ell_1$+TV regularization can achieve an optimal resolution of $\sim 20-30$% of the diffraction limit $\lambda/D_{\rm max}$, which is the nominal spatial resolution of a radio interferometer. With the proposed technique, the EHT can robustly and reasonably achieve super-resolution sufficient to clearly resolve the black hole shadow. These results make it promising for the EHT to provide an unprecedented view of the event-horizon-scale structure in the vicinity of the super-massive black hole in M87 and also the Galactic center Sgr A*.
  • We have measured continuum flux densities of a high-mass protostar candidate, a radio source I in the Orion KL region (Orion Source I) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at band 8 with an angular resolution of 0.1". The continuum emission at 430, 460, and 490 GHz associated with Source I shows an elongated structure along the northwest-southeast direction perpendicular to the so-called low-velocity bipolar outflow. The deconvolved size of the continuum source, 90 au times 20 au, is consistent with those reported previously at other millimeter/submillimeter wavelength. The flux density can be well fitted to the optically thick black-body spectral energy distribution (SED), and the brightness temperature is evaluated to be 700-800 K. It is much lower than that in the case of proton-electron or H- free-free radiations. Our data are consistent with the latest ALMA results by Plambeck & Wright (2016), in which the continuum emission have been proposed to arise from the edge-on circumstellar disk via thermal dust emission, unless the continuum source consists of an unresolved structure with the smaller beam filling factor.
  • We have measured an annual parallax of the Mira variable R~Ursae~Majoris (R~UMa) with the VLBI exploration for Radio Astronomy (VERA). From the monitoring VLBI observations spanning about two years, we detected H$_2$O maser spots in the LSR velocities ranges from 37 to 42 km\,s$^{-1}$. We derived an annual parallax of 1.97$\pm$0.05\,mas, and it gives a corresponding distance of 508$\pm$13\,pc. The VLBI maps revealed 72 maser spots distributed in $\sim$110 au area around an expected stellar position. Circumstellar kinematics of the maser spots were also revealed by subtracting a systemic motion in the Hipparcos catalog from proper motions of each maser spots derived from our VLBI observations. Infrared photometry is also conducted to measure a $K$ band apparent magnitude, and we obtained a mean magnitude of $m_K$ = 1.19$\pm$0.02\,mag. Using the trigonometric distance, the $m_K$ is converted to a $K$ band absolute magnitude of $M_K = -$7.34$\pm$0.06\,mag. This result gives a much more accurate absolute magnitude of R~UMa than previously provided. We solved a zero-point of $M_K - \log P$ relation for the Galactic Mira variables and obtained a relation of $M_K = -$3.52 $\log P$ + (1.09 $\pm$ 0.14). Other long period variables including red supergiants, whose distances were determined from astrometric VLBI, were also compiled to explore the different sequences of $M_K - \log P$ relation.
  • We report on the 1.6 GHz (18 cm) VLBI observations of the unresolved, steady TeV source HESS J1943+213 located in the Galactic plane, performed with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2014. Our new observations with a nearly full EVN array provide the deepest image of HESS J1943+213 at the highest resolution ever achieved, enabling us to resolve the long-standing issues of the source identification. The milliarcsecond-scale structure of HESS J1943+213 has a clear asymmetric morphology, consisting of a compact core and a diffuse jet-like tail. This is broadly consistent with the previous e-EVN observations of the source performed in 2011, and re-analyzed in this work. The core component is characterized by the brightness temperature of $\gtrsim1.8 \times 10^9$ K, which is typical for low-luminosity blazars in general. Overall, radio properties of HESS J1943+213 are consistent with the source classification as an "extreme high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object". Remarkably, we note that since HESS J1943+213 does not reveal any optical or infrared signatures of the AGN activity, it would never be recognized and identified as a BL Lac object, if not its location close to the Galactic plane where the High Energy Stereoscopic System has surveyed, and the follow-up dedicated X-ray and radio studies triggered by the source detection in the TeV range. Our results suggest therefore a presence of an unrecognized, possibly very numerous population of particularly extreme HBLs, and simultaneously demonstrate that the low-frequency VLBI observations with high-angular resolution are indispensable for a proper identification of such objects.
  • For short-wavelength VLBI observations, it is difficult to measure the phase of the visibility function accurately. The closure phases are reliable measurements under this situation, though it is not sufficient to retrieve all of the phase information. We propose a new method, Phase Retrieval from Closure Phase (PRECL). PRECL estimates all the visibility phases only from the closure phases. Combining PRECL with a sparse modeling method we have already proposed, imaging process of VLBI does not rely on dirty image nor self-calibration. The proposed method is tested numerically and the results are promising.
  • The Galactic Center black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is a prime observing target for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), which can resolve the 1.3 mm emission from this source on angular scales comparable to that of the general relativistic shadow. Previous EHT observations have used visibility amplitudes to infer the morphology of the millimeter-wavelength emission. Potentially much richer source information is contained in the phases. We report on 1.3 mm phase information on Sgr A* obtained with the EHT on a total of 13 observing nights over 4 years. Closure phases, the sum of visibility phases along a closed triangle of interferometer baselines, are used because they are robust against phase corruptions introduced by instrumentation and the rapidly variable atmosphere. The median closure phase on a triangle including telescopes in California, Hawaii, and Arizona is nonzero. This result conclusively demonstrates that the millimeter emission is asymmetric on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii and can be used to break 180-degree rotational ambiguities inherent from amplitude data alone. The stability of the sign of the closure phase over most observing nights indicates persistent asymmetry in the image of Sgr A* that is not obscured by refraction due to interstellar electrons along the line of sight.
  • We present an observational study of the vibrationally excited H$_{2}$O line at 658 GHz ($\nu_{2}$=1, 1$_{1, 0}$-1$_{0, 1}$) toward Orion KL using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). This line is clearly detected at the position of the massive protostar candidate, the Source I. The spatial structure is compact with a size of about 100 AU and is elongated along the northeast-southwest low-velocity (18 km s$^{-1}$) bipolar outflow traced by 22 GHz H$_{2}$O masers, SiO masers, and thermal SiO lines. A velocity gradient can be seen perpendicular to the bipolar outflow. Overall spatial and velocity structure seems analogous to that of the 321 GHz H$_{2}$O maser line previously detected with ALMA and vibrationally excited SiO maser emission. The brightness temperature of the 658 GHz H$_{2}$O line is estimated to be higher than 2$\times$10$^{4}$ K, implying that it is emitted via maser action. Our results suggest that the 658 GHz H$_{2}$O maser line is emitted from the base of the outflow from a rotating and expanding accretion disk as observed for the SiO masers and the 321 GHz H$_{2}$O maser. We also search for two other H$_{2}$O lines at 646 GHz (9$_{7, 3}$-8$_{8, 0}$ and 9$_{7, 2}$-8$_{8, 1}$), but they are not detected in Orion KL.
  • We report on results from new high-sensitivity, high-resolution 86GHz (3.5 millimeter) observations of the jet base in the nearby radio galaxy M87, obtained by the Very Long Baseline Array in conjunction with the Green Bank Telescope. The resulting image has a dynamic range exceeding 1500 to 1, the highest ever achieved for this jet at this frequency, resolving and imaging a detailed jet formation/collimation structure down to ~10 Schwarzschild radii (Rs). The obtained 86GHz image clearly confirms some important jet features known at lower frequencies, i.e., a wide-opening angle jet base, a limb-brightened intensity profile, a parabola-shape collimation profile and a counter jet. The limb-brightened structure is already well developed at < 0.2mas (< 28Rs, projected) from the core, where the corresponding apparent opening angle becomes as wide as ~100 degrees. The subsequent jet collimation near the black hole evolves in a complicated manner; there is a "constricted" structure at tens Rs from the core, where the jet cross section is locally shrinking. We suggest that an external pressure support from the inner part of radiatively-inefficient accretion flow may be dynamically important in shaping/confining the footprint of the magnetized jet. We also present the first VLBI 86GHz polarimetric experiment for this source, where a highly polarized (~20%) feature is detected near the jet base, indicating the presence of a well-ordered magnetic field. As a by-product, we additionally report a 43/86 GHz polarimetric result for our calibrator 3C 273 suggesting an extreme rotation measure near the core.
  • Near a black hole, differential rotation of a magnetized accretion disk is thought to produce an instability that amplifies weak magnetic fields, driving accretion and outflow. These magnetic fields would naturally give rise to the observed synchrotron emission in galaxy cores and to the formation of relativistic jets, but no observations to date have been able to resolve the expected horizon-scale magnetic-field structure. We report interferometric observations at 1.3-millimeter wavelength that spatially resolve the linearly polarized emission from the Galactic Center supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. We have found evidence for partially ordered fields near the event horizon, on scales of ~6 Schwarzschild radii, and we have detected and localized the intra-hour variability associated with these fields.
  • We report on 230 GHz (1.3 mm) VLBI observations of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope using antennas on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Mt. Graham in Arizona and Cedar Flat in California. For the first time, we have acquired 230 GHz VLBI interferometric phase information on M87 through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of long baselines. Most of the measured closure phases are consistent with 0$^{\circ}$ as expected by physically-motivated models for 230 GHz structure such as jet models and accretion disk models. The brightness temperature of the event-horizon-scale structure is $\sim 1 \times 10^{10}$ K derived from the compact flux density of $\sim 1$ Jy and the angular size of $\sim 40 $ $\rm \mu$as $\sim$ 5.5 $R_{{\rm s}}$, which is broadly consistent with the peak brightness of the radio cores at 1-86 GHz located within $\sim 10^2$ $R_{{\rm s}}$. Our observations occurred in the middle of an enhancement in very-high-energy (VHE) $\rm \gamma$-ray flux, presumably originating in the vicinity of the central black hole. Our measurements, combined with results of multi-wavelength observations, favor a scenario in which the VHE region has an extended size of $\sim$20-60 $R_{{\rm s}}$.
  • We report the trigonometric parallax of IRAS 07427-2400 with VERA to be 0.185 $\pm$ 0.027 mas, corresponding to a distance of 5.41$^{+0.92}_{-0.69}$ kpc. The result is consistent with the previous result of 5.32$^{+0.49}_{-0.42}$ kpc obtained by Choi et al. (2014) within error. To remove the effect of internal maser motions (e.g., random motions), we observed six maser features associated with IRAS 07427-2400 and determined systematic proper motions of the source by averaging proper motions of the six maser features. The obtained proper motions are ($\mu_{\alpha}$cos$\delta$, $\mu_{\delta}$) = ($-$1.79 $\pm$ 0.32, 2.60 $\pm$ 0.17) mas yr$^{-1}$ in equatorial coordinates, while Choi et al. (2014) showed ($\mu_{\alpha}$cos$\delta$, $\mu_{\delta}$) = ($-$2.43 $\pm$ 0.02, 2.49 $\pm$ 0.09) mas yr$^{-1}$ with one maser feature. Our astrometry results place the source in the Perseus arm, the nearest main arm in the Milky Way. Using our result with previous astrometry results obtained from observations of the Perseus arm, we conducted direct (quantitative) comparisons between 27 astrometry results and an analytic gas dynamics model based on the density-wave theory and obtained two results. First is the pitch angle of the Perseus arm determined by VLBI astrometry, 11.1 $\pm$ 1.4 deg, differing from what is determined by the spiral potential model (probably traced by stars), $\sim$ 20 deg. The second is an offset between a dense gas region and the bottom of the spiral potential model. The dense gas region traced by VLBI astrometry is located downstream of the spiral potential model, which was previously confirmed in the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 in Egusa et al. (2011).
  • The radio galaxy 3C84 is a representative of gamma-ray-bright misaligned active galactic nuclei (AGN) and one of the best laboratories to study the radio properties of subparsec scale jets. We discuss here the past and present activity of the nuclear region within the central 1pc and the properties of subparsec-sized components C1, C2 and C3. We compare these results with the high resolution space-VLBI image at 5GHz obtained with the RadioAstron satellite and we shortly discuss the possible correlation of radio emission with the gamma-ray emission.
  • We conducted astrometric VLBI observations of water-vapor maser emission in the massive star forming region IRAS 21379+5106 to measure the annual parallax and proper motion, using VERA. The annual parallax was measured to be $0.262 \pm 0.031$ mas corresponding to a trigonometric distance of $3.82^{+0.51}_{-0.41}$ kpc. The proper motion was $(\mu_\alpha\cos{\delta}, \mu_\delta)=(-2.74 \pm 0.08, -2.87 \pm 0.18)$ mas yr$^{-1}$. Using this result, the Galactic rotational velocity was estimated to be $V_\theta=218\pm 19$ km s$^{-1}$ at the Galactocentric distance $R=9.22\pm0.43$ kpc, when we adopted the Galactic constants $R_0=8.05\pm 0.45$ kpc and $V_0=238\pm 14$ km s$^{-1}$. With newly determined distance, {the bolometric luminosity of the central young stellar object was re-evaluated to $(2.15\pm 0.54)\times 10^3 L_\odot$, which corresponds to spectral type of} B2--B3. Maser features were found to be distributed along a straight line from south-west to north-east. In addition, a vector map of the internal motions constructed from the residual proper motions implies that maser features trace a bipolar flow and that it cannot be explained by simple ballistic motion.
  • We report on a long-term single-dish and VLBI monitoring for intermittent flare activities of a Dominant Blue-Shifted H$_{2}$O Maser (DBSM) associated with a southern high mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. Bi-weekly single-dish monitoring using Hokkaido University Tomakomai 11-m radio telescope has shown that a systematic acceleration continues over four years beyond a lifetime of individual maser features. This fact suggests that the H$_{2}$O maser traces a region where molecular gas is steadily accelerated. There were five maser flares during five-years monitoring, and maser distributions in four of them were densely monitored by the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The overall distribution of the maser features suggests the presence of a bipolar jet, with the 3D kinematics indicating that it is almost face-on (inclination angle of $\sim$ 8$^{\fdg}$--17$^{\fdg}$ from the line-of-sight). Most of maser features were recurrently excited within a region of 100$\times$100 AU$^{2}$ around the radio continuum peak, while their spatial distributions significantly varied between each flare. This confirms that episodic propagations of outflow shocks recurrently invoke intermittent flare activities. We also measured annual parallax, deriving the source distance of 1.70 $^{+0.19}_{-0.16}$ kpc that is consistent with the commonly-used photometric distance.
  • We have carried out high resolution observations with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) of continuum emission from Orion KL region. We identify 11 compact sources at ALMA band 6 (245 GHz) and band 7 (339 GHz), including Hot Core, Compact Ridge, SMA1, IRc4, IRc7, and a radio source I (Source I). Spectral energy distribution (SED) of each source is determined by using previous 3 mm continuum emission data. Physical properties such as size, mass, hydrogen number density and column density are discussed based on the dust graybody SED. Among 11 identified sources, Source I, a massive protostar candidate, is a dominant energy source in Orion KL. We extensively investigate its SED from centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths. The SED of Source I can be fitted with a single power-law index of 1.97 suggesting an optically thick emission. We employ the H$^{-}$ free-free emission as an opacity source of this optically thick emission. The temperature, density, and mass of the circumstellar disk associated with Source I are constrained by the SED of H$^{-}$ free-free emission. Still the fitting result shows a significant deviation from the observed flux densities. Combined with the thermal dust graybody SED to explain excess emission at higher frequency, a smaller power-law index of 1.60 for the H$^{-}$ free-free emission is obtained in the SED fitting. The power-law index smaller than 2 would suggest a compact source size or a clumpy structure unresolved with the present study. Future higher resolution observations with ALMA are essential to reveal more detailed spatial structure and physical properties of Source I.
  • The 22 GHz H2O maser in Orion KL has shown extraordinary burst events in 1979-1985 and 1998-1999, sometimes called supermaser. We have conducted monitoring observations of the supermaser in Orion KL using VERA, VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry, in the current third burst since 2011 March. Three flux maxima are detected in 2011 and 2012 with rising and falling timescales of 2-7 months. Time variations of the supermaser seem symmetric for all of the active phases. The maximum total flux density of 135000 Jy is observed in 2012 June while it is still one order of magnitude lower than those in previous bursts. The supermaser consists of two spatially different components at different velocities. They are elongated along a northwest-southeast direction perpendicular to the low-velocity outflow driven by Source I. Proper motions of the supermaser features with respect to Source I are measured toward west and southwest directions, almost parallel to the low-velocity outflow. The flux density and linewidth show an anti-correlation as expected for an unsaturated maser emission. The supermaser is located close to the methylformate (HCOOCH3) line and continuum emission peaks in the Orion Compact Ridge detected by ALMA. The broader velocity range of the weak HCOOCH3 emission at the supermaser position would be an evidence of a shock front. On the other hand, the 321 GHz H2O line is not detected at the position of the supermaser. It can be explained qualitatively by one of the theoretical H2O excitation models without extraordinary conditions. Our results support a scenario that the supermaser is excited in the dense gas interacting with the low-velocity outflow in the Compact Ridge. The extremely high flux density and its symmetric time variation for rising and falling phases could be explained by a beaming effect during the amplification process rather than changes in physical conditions.
  • We propose a new technique to obtain super-resolution images with radio interferometer using sparse modeling. In standard radio interferometry, sampling of ($u$, $v$) is quite often incomplete and thus obtaining an image from observed visibilities becomes an underdetermined problem, and a technique so-called "zero-padding" is often used to fill up unsampled grids in ($u$, $v$) plane, resulting in image degradation by finite beam size as well as numerous side-lobes. In this paper we show that directly solving such an underdetermined problem based on sparse modeling (in this paper LASSO) avoids the above problems introduced by zero-padding, leading to super-resolution images in which structure finer than the standard beam size (diffraction limit) can be reproduced. We present results of one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of interferometric imaging, and discuss its implications to super-resolution imaging, particularly focusing on imaging of black hole shadows with millimeter VLBI.
  • The Korean very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) network (KVN) and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) Array (KaVA) is the first international VLBI array dedicated to high-frequency (23 and 43 GHz bands) observations in East Asia. Here, we report the first imaging observations of three bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) known for their complex morphologies: 4C 39.25, 3C 273, and M 87. This is one of the initial result of KaVA early science. Our KaVA images reveal extended outflows with complex substructure such as knots and limb brightening, in agreement with previous Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations. Angular resolutions are better than 1.4 and 0.8 milliarcsecond at 23 GHz and 43 GHz, respectively. KaVA achieves a high dynamic range of ~1000, more than three times the value achieved by VERA. We conclude that KaVA is a powerful array with a great potential for the study of AGN outflows, at least comparable to the best existing radio interferometric arrays.