• The mechanism responsible for the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a debated issue. The prompt phase-related GRB correlations can allow to discriminate among the most plausible theoretical models explaining this emission. We present an overview of the observational two-parameter correlations, their physical interpretations, their use as redshift estimators and possibly as cosmological tools. The nowadays challenge is to make GRBs, the farthest stellar-scaled objects observed (up to redshift $z=9.4$), standard candles through well established and robust correlations. However, GRBs spanning several orders of magnitude in their energetics are far from being standard candles. We describe the advances in the prompt correlation research in the past decades, with particular focus paid to the discoveries in the last 20 years.
  • The mechanism responsible for the afterglow emission of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and its connection to the prompt $\gamma$-ray emission is still a debated issue. Relations between intrinsic properties of the prompt or afterglow emission can help to discriminate between plausible theoretical models of GRB production. Here we present an overview of the afterglow and prompt-afterglow two parameter relations, their physical interpretations, their use as redshift estimators and as possible cosmological tools. A similar task has already been correctly achieved for Supernovae (SNe) Ia by using the peak magnitude-stretch relation, known in the literature as the Phillips relation \citep{phillips93}. The challenge today is to make GRBs, which are amongst the farthest objects ever observed, standardizable candles as the SNe Ia through well established and robust relations. Thus, the study of relations amongst the observable and physical properties of GRBs is highly relevant together with selection biases in their physical quantities. Therefore, we describe the state of the art of the existing GRB relations, their possible and debated interpretations in view of the current theoretical models and how relations are corrected for selection biases. We conclude that only after an appropriate evaluation and correction for selection effects can GRB relations be used to discriminate among the theoretical models responsible for the prompt and afterglow emission and to estimate cosmological parameters.
  • The prompt emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) even after several decades remains a mystery. However, it is believed that correlations between observable GRB properties given their huge luminosity/radiated energy and redshift distribution extending up to at least $z \approx 9$, are promising possible cosmological tools. They also may help to discriminate among the most plausible theoretical models. Nowadays, the objective is to make GRBs standard candles, similar to supernovae (SNe) Ia, through well-established and robust correlations. However, differently from SNe Ia, GRBs span over several order of magnitude in their energetics and hence cannot yet be considered standard candles. Additionally, being observed at very large distances their physical properties are affected by selection biases, the so called Malmquist bias or Eddington effect. We describe the state of the art on how GRB prompt correlations are corrected for these selection biases in order to employ them as redshift estimators and cosmological tools. We stress that only after an appropriate evaluation and correction for these effects, the GRB correlations can be used to discriminate among the theoretical models of prompt emission, to estimate the cosmological parameters and to serve as distance indicators via redshift estimation.
  • A class of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a plateau phase in their X-ray afterglows obeys a three-dimensional (3D) relation (Dainotti et al. 2016), between the rest-frame time at the end of the plateau, Ta, its corresponding X-ray luminosity, La, and the peak luminosity in the prompt emission, Lpeak. We extended the original analysis with X-ray data from July 2014 to July 2016 achieving a total sample of 183 Swift GRBs with afterglow plateaus and known redshifts. We added the most recent GRBs to the previous 'gold sample' (now including 45 GRBs) and obtained a relation plane with intrinsic scatter compatible within one sigma with the previous result. We compared several GRB categories, such as short with extended emission, X-ray Flashes, GRBs associated with SNe, long-duration GRBs, and the gold sample, composed only by GRBs with light curves with good data coverage and relatively flat plateaus and evaluated their relation planes. We found that they are not statistically different from the fundamental plane derived from the gold sample and that the fundamental plane still has the smallest scatter. We compared the jet opening angles tabulated in literature with the angles derived using the Eiso-Egamma relation of the method in Pescalli et al. (2015) and calculated the relation plane for a sample of long GRBs accounting for the different jet opening angles. We observed that this correction does not significantly reduce the scatter. In an extended analysis, we found that the fundamental plane is independent from several prompt and afterglow parameters.
  • We explore the spectral and polarization properties of photospheric emissions from stratified jets in which multiple components, separated by a sharp velocity shear regions, are distributed in lateral direction. Propagation of thermal photons injected at high optical depth region are calculated until they escape from the photosphere. It is found that presence of the lateral structure within the jet leads to non-thermal feature of the spectra and significant polarization signal in the resulting emission. The deviation from thermal spectra as well as the polarization degree tends to be enhanced as the velocity gradient in the shear region increases. In particular, we show that emissions from multi-component jet can reproduce the typical observed spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) irrespective to the position of the observer when a velocity shear region is closely spaced in various lateral ($\theta$) positions. The degree of polarization associated in the emission is significant (> few%) at wide range of observer angles and can be higher than 30%.