• Over the last decade, thanks to the successful space missions launched to detect stellar pulsations, Asteroseismology has produced an extraordinary revolution in astrophysics, unveiling a wealth of results on structural properties of stars over a large part of the H-R diagram. Particularly impressive has been the development of Asteroseismology for stars showing solar-like oscillations, which are excited and intrinsically damped in stars with convective envelopes. Here I will review on the modern era of Asteroseismology with emphasis on results obtained for solar-like stars and discuss its potential for the advancement of stellar physics.
  • Red giants are evolved stars that have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and instead burn hydrogen in a surrounding shell. Once a red giant is sufficiently evolved, the helium in the core also undergoes fusion. Outstanding issues in our understanding of red giants include uncertainties in the amount of mass lost at the surface before helium ignition and the amount of internal mixing from rotation and other processes. Progress is hampered by our inability to distinguish between red giants burning helium in the core and those still only burning hydrogen in a shell. Asteroseismology offers a way forward, being a powerful tool for probing the internal structures of stars using their natural oscillation frequencies. Here we report observations of gravity-mode period spacings in red giants that permit a distinction between evolutionary stages to be made. We use high-precision photometry obtained with the Kepler spacecraft over more than a year to measure oscillations in several hundred red giants. We find many stars whose dipole modes show sequences with approximately regular period spacings. These stars fall into two clear groups, allowing us to distinguish unambiguously between hydrogen-shell-burning stars (period spacing mostly about 50 seconds) and those that are also burning helium (period spacing about 100 to 300 seconds).
  • Recent revisions of the determination of the solar composition have resulted in solar models in marked disagreement with helioseismic inferences. The effect of the composition change on the model is largely caused by the change in the opacity. Thus we wish to determine an intrinsic opacity change that would compensate for the revision of the composition. By comparing models computed with the old and revised composition we determine the required opacity change. Models are computed with the opacity thus modified and used as reference in helioseismic inversions to determine the difference between the solar and model sound speed. An opacity increase varying from around 30 per cent near the base of the convection zone to a few percent in the solar core results in a sound-speed profile, with the revised composition, which is essentially indistinguishable from the original solar model. As a function of the logarithm of temperature this is well represented by a simple cubic fit. The physical realism of such a change remains debatable, however.