• We study magnitudes and temperature dependences of the electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction times which play the dominant role in the formation and relaxation of photon induced hotspot in two dimensional amorphous WSi films. The time constants are obtained through magnetoconductance measurements in perpendicular magnetic field in the superconducting fluctuation regime and through time-resolved photoresponse to optical pulses. The excess magnetoconductivity is interpreted in terms of the weak-localization effect and superconducting fluctuations. Aslamazov-Larkin, and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuation alone fail to reproduce the magnetic field dependence in the relatively high magnetic field range when the temperature is rather close to Tc because the suppression of the electronic density of states due to the formation of short lifetime Cooper pairs needs to be considered. The time scale {\tau}_i of inelastic scattering is ascribed to a combination of electron-electron ({\tau}_(e-e)) and electron-phonon ({\tau}_(e-ph)) interaction times, and a characteristic electron-fluctuation time ({\tau}_(e-fl)), which makes it possible to extract their magnitudes and temperature dependences from the measured {\tau}_i. The ratio of phonon-electron ({\tau}_(ph-e)) and electron-phonon interaction times is obtained via measurements of the optical photoresponse of WSi microbridges. Relatively large {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(ph-e) and {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(e-e) ratios ensure that in WSi the photon energy is more efficiently confined in the electron subsystem than in other materials commonly used in the technology of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We discuss the impact of interaction times on the hotspot dynamics and compare relevant metrics of SNSPDs from different materials.
  • We studied timing jitter in the appearance of photon counts in meandering nanowires with different fractional amount of bends. Timing jitter, which is the probability density of the random time delay between photon absorption in current-carrying superconducting nanowire and appearance of the normal domain, reveals two different underlying physical scenarios. In the deterministic regime, which is realized at large currents and photon energies, jitter is controlled by position dependent detection threshold in straight parts of meanders and decreases with the current. At small photon energies, jitter increases and its current dependence disappears. In this probabilistic regime jitter is controlled by Poisson process in that magnetic vortices jump randomly across the wire in areas adjacent to the bends.