• The physical processes that determine the properties of our everyday world, and of the wider cosmos, are determined by some key numbers: the 'constants' of micro-physics and the parameters that describe the expanding universe in which we have emerged. We identify various steps in the emergence of stars, planets and life that are dependent on these fundamental numbers, and explore how these steps might have been changed, or completely prevented, if the numbers were different. We then outline some cosmological models where physical reality is vastly more extensive than the 'universe' that astronomers observe (perhaps even involving many 'big bangs'), which could perhaps encompass domains governed by different physics. Although the concept of a multiverse is still speculative, we argue that attempts to determine whether it exists constitute a genuinely scientific endeavor. If we indeed inhabit a multiverse, then we may have to accept that there can be no explanation other than anthropic reasoning for some features our world.
  • With N-body simulations of a planetary system with an asteroid belt we investigate how the asteroid impact rate on the Earth is affected by the architecture of the planetary system. We find that the $\nu_6$ secular resonance plays an important role in the asteroid collision rate with the Earth. Compared to exoplanetary systems, the solar system is somewhat special in its lack of a super-Earth mass planet in the inner solar system. We therefore first consider the effects of the presence of a super-Earth in the terrestrial planet region. We find a significant effect for super-Earths with a mass of around $10\,\rm M_\oplus$ and a separation greater than about $0.7\,\rm AU$. For a super-Earth that is interior to the Earth's orbit, the number of asteroids colliding with Earth increases the closer the super-Earth is to the Earth's orbit. This is the result of multiple secular resonance locations causing more asteroids to be perturbed onto Earth-crossing orbits. When the super-Earth is placed exterior to Earth's orbit, the collision rate decreases substantially because the $\nu_6$ resonance no longer exists in the asteroid belt region. We also find that changing the semi-major axis of Saturn leads to a significant decrease in the asteroid collision rate, while increasing its mass increases the collision rate. These results may have implications for the habitability of exoplanetary systems.
  • Gravitational deflection of starlight around the Sun during the 1919 total solar eclipse provided measurements that confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to measure the analogous process of astrometric microlensing caused by a nearby star, the white dwarf Stein 2051 B. As Stein 2051 B passed closely in front of a background star, the background star's position was deflected. Measurement of this deflection at multiple epochs allowed us to determine the mass of Stein 2051 B -- the sixth nearest white dwarf to the Sun -- as 0.675 +/- 0.051 solar masses. This mass determination provides confirmation of the physics of degenerate matter and lends support to white dwarf evolutionary theory.
  • Pulsar timing observations have revealed planets around only a few pulsars. We suggest that the rarity of these planets is due mainly to two effects. First, we show that the most likely formation mechanism requires the destruction of a companion star. Only pulsars with a suitable companion (with an extreme mass ratio) are able to form planets. Second, while a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) in the disk is generally thought to be essential for planet formation, it is most probably rare in disks around pulsars because of the irradiation from the pulsar. The irradiation strongly heats the inner parts of the disk pushing the inner boundary of the dead zone out. We suggest that the rarity of pulsar planets can be explained by the low probability for these two requirements - a very low-mass companion and a dead zone - to be satisfied.
  • We first consider how the level of turbulence in a protoplanetary disk affects the formation locations for the observed close-in super-Earths in exosolar systems. We find that a protoplanetary disk that includes a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) has substantially more material in the inner parts of the disk, possibly allowing for in situ formation. For the dead zone to last the entire lifetime of the disk requires the active layer surface density to be sufficiently small, <100 g/cm^2. Migration through a dead zone may be very slow and thus super-Earth formation followed by migration towards the star through the dead zone is less likely. For fully turbulent disks, there is not enough material for in situ formation. However, in this case, super-Earths can form farther out in the disk and migrate inwards on a reasonable timescale. We suggest that both of these formation mechanisms operate in different planetary systems. This can help to explain the observed large range in densities of super-Earths because the formation location determines the composition. Furthermore, we speculate that super-Earths could have formed in the inner parts of our solar system and cleared the material in the region inside of Mercury's orbit. The super-Earths could migrate through the gas disk and fall into the Sun if the disk was sufficiently cool during the final gas disk accretion process. While it is definitely possible to meet all of these requirements, we don't expect them to occur in all systems, which may explain why the solar system is somewhat special in its lack of super-Earths.
  • We study the properties of a significant thermal emission component that was identified in 47 GRBs observed by different instruments. Within the framework of the "fireball" model, we deduce the values of the Lorentz factor Gamma, and the acceleration radius, r_0, for these bursts. We find that all the values of Gamma in our sample are in the range 10^2 <= Gamma <= 10^3, with <Gamma> = 370. We find a very weak dependence of Gamma on the acceleration radius r_0, Gamma ~ r_0^alpha with alpha = -0.10 +- 0.09 at sigma = 2.1 confidence level. The values of r_0 span a wide range, 10^6.5 <= r_0 <= 10^{9.5} cm, with mean value <r_0>~10^{8} cm. This is higher than the gravitational radius of a 10 M_sun black hole by a factor ~30. We argue that this result provides indirect evidence for jet propagation inside a massive star, and suggests the existence of recollimation shocks that take place close to this radius.
  • With the availability of considerably more data, we revisit the question of how special our Solar System is, compared to observed exoplanetary systems. To this goal, we employ a mathematical transformation that allows for a meaningful, statistical comparison. We find that the masses and densities of the giant planets in our Solar System are very typical, as is the age of the Solar System. While the orbital location of Jupiter is somewhat of an outlier, this is most likely due to strong selection effects towards short-period planets. The eccentricities of the planets in our Solar System are relatively small compared to those in observed exosolar systems, but still consistent with the expectations for an 8-planet system (and could, in addition, reflect a selection bias towards high-eccentricity planets). The two characteristics of the Solar System that we find to be most special are the lack of super-Earths with orbital periods of days to months and the general lack of planets inside of the orbital radius of Mercury. Overall, we conclude that in terms of its broad characteristics our Solar System is not expected to be extremely rare, allowing for a level of optimism in the search for extrasolar life.
  • Close-in planets are in jeopardy as their host stars evolve off the main sequence to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5--2\Mso ), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity, on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and Red Giants. We find that planet engulfment during the Red Giant Branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar mass and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created, that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from main sequence stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.
  • Bold strategies are needed to identify most of the elusive particles that should make up most of the Universe's mass
  • CO is thought to be a vital building block for prebiotic molecules that are necessary for life. Thus, understanding where CO existed in a solid phase within the solar nebula is important for understanding the origin of life. We model the evolution of the CO snow line in a protoplanetary disk. We find that the current observed location of the CO snow line in our solar system, and in the solar system analogue TW Hydra, cannot be explained by a fully turbulent disk model. With time-dependent disk models we find that the inclusion of a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) can resolve this problem. Furthermore, we obtain a fully analytic solution for the CO snow line radius for late disk evolutionary times. This will be useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics and predict the composition and habitability of exoplanets.
  • We examine the evolution of the snow line in a protoplanetary disc that contains a dead zone (a region of zero or low turbulence). The snow line is within a self-gravitating part of the dead zone, and we obtain a fully analytic solution for its radius. Our formula could prove useful for future observational attempts to characterise the demographics of planets outside the snow line. External sources such as comic rays or X-rays from the central star can ionise the disc surface layers and allow the magneto-rotational instability to drive turbulence there. We show that provided that the surface density in this layer is less than about 50 g/cm^2, the dead zone solution exists, after an initial outbursting phase, until the disc is dispersed by photoevaporation. We demonstrate that the snow line radius is significantly larger than that predicted by a fully turbulent disc model, and that in our own solar system it remains outside of the orbital radius of the Earth. Thus, the inclusion of a dead zone into a protoplanetary disc model explains how our Earth formed with very little water.
  • Motivated by recent observations of short-timescale variations in the infrared emission of circumstellar disks, we propose that coronal mass ejections can remove dust grains on timescales as short as a few days. Continuous monitoring of stellar activity, coupled to infrared observations, can place meaningful constraints on the proposed mechanism.
  • Suggestions have been made that asteroid belts may be important both for the existence of life and perhaps even for the evolution of complex life on a planet. Using numerical models for protoplanetary discs we calculate the location of the snow line, and we propose that asteroid belts are most likely to form in its vicinity. We then show that observations of warm dust in exo-solar systems, thought to be produced by collisions between asteroids in a belt, indicate that asteroid belts (when they exist), indeed coincide with the radial location and the temperature of the snow line. Giant planets form outside the snow line and prevent planet formation just inside of their orbit creating an asteroid belt there. However, the migration of giant planets through the asteroid belt likely disperses the compact formation. We examine existing observations of giant exo-planets and find that less than 4% are at radial locations outside of the snow line. This definitely may be the consequence of observational selection effects. However, with this caveat in mind, we point out that the dearth of giant planets outside the snow line may also suggest that compact asteroid belts are not common, and more speculatively that complex life may not expected in most of the currently observed systems.
  • We present here the analysis of about 19,500 new star hours of low ecliptic latitude observations (|b| < 20 deg) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope's FGS over a time span of more than nine years; which is an addition to the 12,000 star hours previously analyzed by Schlichting et al. (2009). Our search for stellar occultations by small Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) yielded one new candidate event corresponding to a body with a 530 +/-70m radius at a distance of about 40AU. Using bootstrap simulations, we estimate a probability of approx 5%, that this event is due to random statistical fluctuations within the new data set. Combining this new event with the single KBO occultation reported by Schlichting et al. (2009) we arrive at the following results: 1) The ecliptic latitudes of 6.6 deg and 14.4 deg of the two events are consistent with the observed inclination distribution of larger, 100km-sized KBOs. 2) Assuming that small, sub-km sized KBOs have the same ecliptic latitude distribution as their larger counterparts, we find an ecliptic surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250m of N(r>250m) = 1.1^{+1.5}_{-0.7} x 10^7 deg^{-2}; if sub-km sized KBOs have instead a uniform ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 deg < b< 20 deg then N(r>250m) = 4.4^{+5.8}_{-2.8} x 10^6 deg^{-2}. This is the best measurement of the surface density of sub-km sized KBOs to date. 3) Assuming the KBO size distribution can be well described by a single power law given by N(>r) \propto r^{1-q}, where N(>r) is the number of KBOs with radii greater than r, and q is the power law index, we find q=3.8+/-0.2 for a KBO ecliptic latitude distribution that follows the observed distribution for larger, 100-km sized KBOs. 4) Regardless of the exact power law, our results suggest that small KBOs are numerous enough to satisfy the required supply rate for the Jupiter family comets. (Abridged)
  • We study for the first time the environment of massive black hole (BH) seeds (~10^4-5 Msun) formed via the direct collapse of pristine gas clouds in massive haloes (>10^7 Msun) at z>6. Our model is based on the evolution of dark matter haloes within a cosmological N-body simulation, combined with prescriptions for the formation of BH along with both Pop III and Pop II stars. We calculate the spatially-varying intensity of Lyman Werner (LW) radiation from stars and identify the massive pristine haloes in which it is high enough to shut down molecular hydrogen cooling. In contrast to previous BH seeding models with a spatially constant LW background, we find that the intensity of LW radiation due to local sources, J_local, can be up to 10^6 times the spatially averaged background in the simulated volume and exceeds the critical value, J_crit, for the complete suppression of molecular cooling, in some cases by 4 orders of magnitude. Even after accounting for possible metal pollution in a halo from previous episodes of star formation, we find a steady rise in the formation rate of direct collapse (DC) BHs with decreasing redshift from 10^{-3}/Mpc^3/z at z=12 to 10^{-2}/Mpc^3/z at z=6. The onset of Pop II star formation at z~16 simultaneously marks the onset of the epoch of DCBH formation, as the increased level of LW radiation from Pop II stars is able to elevate the local levels of the LW intensity to J_local > J_crit while Pop III stars fail to do so at any time. The number density of DCBHs is sensitive to the number of LW photons and can vary by an order of magnitude at z=6 after accounting for reionisation feedback. Haloes hosting DCBHs are more clustered than similar massive counterparts that do not host DCBHs, especially at redshifts z>10. We also show that planned surveys with JWST should be able to detect the supermassive stellar precursors of DCBHs.
  • We model the evolution of the snow line in a protoplanetary disc. If the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) drives turbulence throughout the disc, there is a unique snow line outside of which the disc is icy. The snow line moves closer to the star as the infall accretion rate drops. Because the snow line moves inside the radius of the Earth's orbit, the formation of our water-devoid planet is difficult with this model. However, protoplanetary discs are not likely to be sufficiently ionised to be fully turbulent. A dead zone at the mid-plane slows the flow of material through the disc and a steady state cannot be achieved. We therefore model the evolution of the snow line also in a time-dependent disc with a dead zone. As the mass is accumulating, the outer parts of the dead zone become self gravitating, heat the massive disc and thus the outer snow line does not come inside the radius of the Earth's orbit, contrary to the fully turbulent disc model. There is a second, inner icy region, within the dead zone, that moves inwards of the Earth's orbit after a time of about 10^6 yr. With this model there is sufficient time and mass in the disc for the Earth to form from water-devoid planetesimals at a radius of 1 AU. Furthermore, the additional inner icy region predicted by this model may allow for the formation of giant planets close to their host star without the need for much migration.
  • One of the most promising explanations for the origin of the billion solar mass black holes (BHs) inferred to power quasars at redshifts z > 6 is that supermassive stars (SMSs) with masses > 10,000 solar masses collapse to form the seed BHs from which they grow. Here we review recent theoretical advances which provide support for this scenario. Firstly, given sufficiently high accretion rates of gas into the cores of primordial protogalaxies, it appears that neither the high energy radiation emitted from the stellar surface nor the limited lifetime of SMSs can prevent their growth to masses of up to > 100,000 solar masses. Secondly, recent cosmological simulations suggest that the high fluxes of molecule-dissociating radiation which may be required in order to achieve such high accretion rates may be more common in the early universe than previously thought. We conclude that the majority of supermassive BHs may originate from SMSs at high redshifts.
  • We perform global time-dependent simulations of an accretion disc around a young stellar object with a dead zone (a region where the magneto-rotational instability cannot drive turbulence because the material is not sufficiently ionised). For infall accretion rates on to the disc of around 10^-7 Msun/yr, dead zones occur if the critical magnetic Reynolds number is larger than about 10^4. We model the collapse of a molecular gas cloud. At early times when the infall accretion rate is high, the disc is thermally ionised and fully turbulent. However, as the infall accretion rate drops, a dead zone may form if the critical magnetic Reynolds number is sufficiently large, otherwise the disc remains fully turbulent. With a dead zone the disc can become unstable to the gravo-magneto instability. The mass of the star grows in large accretion outbursts that may explain FU Orionis events. At late times there is not sufficient mass in the disc for outbursts to occur but the dead zone becomes even more prominent as the disc cools. Large inner dead zones in the later stages of disc evolution may help to explain observations of transition discs with an inner hole.
  • We have imaged the ejecta of GK Persei (Nova Persei 1901 A.D.) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), revealing hundreds of cometary-like structures. One or both ends of the structures often show a brightness enhancement relative to the structures' middle sections, but there is no simple regularity to their morphologies (in contrast with the Helix nebula). Some of the structures' morphologies suggest the presence of slow-moving or stationary material with which the ejecta is colliding, while others suggest shaping from a wind emanating from GK Per itself. A detailed expansion map of the nova's ejecta was created by comparing HST images taken in successive years. WFPC2 narrowband images and STIS spectra demonstrate that the physical conditions in the ejecta vary strongly on spatial scales much smaller than those of the ejecta. Directly measuring accurate densities and compositions, and hence masses of this and other nova shells, will demand data at least as resolved spatially as those presented here. The filling factor the ejecta is < 1%, and the nova ejecta mass must be less than $10^{-4} \Msun$. A few of the nebulosities vary in brightness by up to a factor of two on timescales of one year. Finally, we present the deepest images yet obtained of a jet-like feature outside the main body of GK Per nebulosity, and the first spectrum of that feature. Dominated by strong, narrow emission lines of [NII], [OII], [OIII], and [SII], this feature is probably a shock due to ejected material running into stationary ISM, slowly moving ejecta from a previous nova episode, or circum-binary matter present before 1901. An upper limit to the mass of the jet is of order a few times $10^{-6} \Msun$. The jet might be an important, or even dominant mass sink from the binary system. The jet's faintness suggests that similar features could easily have been missed in other cataclysmic binaries.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • Angular momentum is transported outwards through an accretion disc by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence thus allowing material to accrete on to the central object. The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) requires a minimum ionisation fraction to drive turbulence in a disc. The inner parts of the disc around a young stellar object are sufficiently hot to be thermally ionised. Further out, cosmic rays ionise the surface layers and a dead zone forms at the mid-plane where the disc is too cool for the MRI to operate. The surface density in the turbulent active layer is often assumed to be constant with radius because the cosmic rays penetrate a constant layer. However, if a critical magnetic Reynolds number, Re_{M,crit}, is used to determine the extent of the dead zone, the surface density in the layer generally increases with radius. For small critical magnetic Reynolds number of order 1, the constant layer approximation may be a reasonable fit. However, MHD simulations suggest the critical magnetic Reynolds number may be much larger, of order 10^4. Analytical fits for the surface density in the magnetic active layer show that \Sigma_m \propto Re_{M,crit}^{-2} R^{9/2} T^{\,2}$, at temperature T and radius R, are a good fit for higher critical magnetic Reynolds number. For the metallicity variation between our galaxy, the LMC and the SMC, there should be no significant difference in the extent of the dead zone. Observations suggest an increase in the lifetime of the disc with decreasing metallicity that cannot be explained by the dead zone structure (ignoring possible differences in dust abundances).
  • We propose two new means of identifying the main class of progenitors of Type Ia supernovae--single or double degenerate: (i) If the range of supernova properties is significantly determined by the range of viewing angles of non-spherically symmetric explosions, then the nature of the correlation between polarization and another property (for example, the velocity gradient) can be used to determine the geometry of the asymmetry and hence the nature of the progenitor, and (ii) in the double- but not in the single-degenerate case, the range in the observed properties (e.g., velocity gradients) is likely to increase with the amount of carbon seen in the ejecta.
  • We propose a new mechanism that produces an orbital period change during a nova outburst. When the ejected material carries away the specific angular momentum of the white dwarf, the orbital period increases. A magnetic field on the surface of the secondary star forces a fraction of the ejected material to corotate with the star, and hence the binary system. The ejected material thus takes angular momentum from the binary orbit and the orbital period decreases. We show that for sufficiently strong magnetic fields on the surface of the secondary star, the total change to the orbital period could even be negative during a nova outburst, contrary to previous expectations. Accurate determinations of pre- and post-outburst orbital periods of recurrent nova systems could test the new mechanism, in addition to providing meaningful constraints on otherwise difficult to measure physical quantities. We apply our mechanism to outbursts of the recurrent nova U Sco.
  • We present new UV-to-IR stellar photometry of four low-extinction windows in the Galactic bulge, obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Using our five bandpasses, we have defined reddening-free photometric indices sensitive to stellar effective temperature and metallicity. We find that the bulge populations resemble those formed via classical dissipative collapse: each field is dominated by an old (~10 Gyr) population exhibiting a wide metallicity range (-1.5 < [Fe/H] < 0.5). We detect a metallicity gradient in the bulge population, with the fraction of stars at super-solar metallicities dropping from 41% to 35% over distances from the Galactic center ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 kpc. One field includes candidate exoplanet hosts discovered in the SWEEPS HST transit survey. Our measurements for 11 of these hosts demonstrate that exoplanets in the distinct bulge environment are preferentially found around high-metallicity stars, as in the solar neighborhood, supporting the view that planets form more readily in metal-rich environments.
  • The orbital period of the recurrent nova U Sco has been observed to decrease during the 1999 outburst. In an outburst mass is ejected from the surface of the white dwarf. The separation of the binary system widens and the orbital period increases. We find that magnetic braking between outbursts, mass transfer to the companion, and frictional angular momentum losses during outbursts are all too small to account for this unexpected change. We find, however, that if the secondary has a sufficiently strong magnetic field, B=8x10^3 G, then the ejected material can couple to it and corrotate with the system. The ejected material gains angular momentum while the binary system loses it and the period decreases. If such a strong magnetic field is indeed present, then we predict that a period decrease should be observed also during the current 2010 outburst. If, however, the presence of such a field can be ruled out observationally, then the cause for the period decrease (if confirmed) remains unknown.