• Neutral hydrogen (HI) will soon be the dark matter tracer observed over the largest volumes of Universe thanks to the 21 cm intensity mapping technique. To unveil cosmological information it is indispensable to understand the HI distribution with respect to dark matter. Using a full one-loop derivation of the power spectrum of HI, we show that higher order corrections change the amplitude and shape of the power spectrum on typical cosmological (linear) scales. These effects go beyond the expected dark matter non-linear corrections and include non-linearities in the way the HI signal traces dark matter. We show that, on linear scales at z = 1, the HI bias drops by up to 15% in both real and redshift space, which results in underpredicting the mass of the halos in which HI lies. Non-linear corrections give rise to a significant scale dependence when redshift space distortions arise, in particular on the scale range of the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). There is a factor of 5 difference between the linear and full HI power spectra over the full BAO scale range, which will modify the ratios between the peaks. This effect will also be seen in other types of survey and it will be essential to take it into account in future experiments in order to match the expectations of precision cosmology.
  • Following the first two annual intensity mapping workshops at Stanford in March 2016 and Johns Hopkins in June 2017, we report on the recent advances in theory, instrumentation and observation that were presented in these meetings and some of the opportunities and challenges that were identified looking forward. With preliminary detections of CO, [CII], Lya and low-redshift 21cm, and a host of experiments set to go online in the next few years, the field is rapidly progressing on all fronts, with great anticipation for a flood of new exciting results. This current snapshot provides an efficient reference for experts in related fields and a useful resource for nonspecialists. We begin by introducing the concept of line-intensity mapping and then discuss the broad array of science goals that will be enabled, ranging from the history of star formation, reionization and galaxy evolution to measuring baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshift and constraining theories of dark matter, modified gravity and dark energy. After reviewing the first detections reported to date, we survey the experimental landscape, presenting the parameters and capabilities of relevant instruments such as COMAP, mmIMe, AIM-CO, CCAT-p, TIME, CONCERTO, CHIME, HIRAX, HERA, STARFIRE, MeerKAT/SKA and SPHEREx. Finally, we describe recent theoretical advances: different approaches to modeling line luminosity functions, several techniques to separate the desired signal from foregrounds, statistical methods to analyze the data, and frameworks to generate realistic intensity map simulations.
  • Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen brightness temperature promises to provide a three-dimensional view of the universe on very large scales. Nonlinear effects are typically thought to alter only the small-scale power, but we show how they may bias the extraction of cosmological information contained in the power spectrum on ultra-large scales. For linear perturbations to remain valid on large scales, we need to renormalize perturbations at higher order. In the case of intensity mapping, the second-order contribution to clustering from weak lensing dominates the nonlinear contribution at high redshift. Renormalization modifies the mean brightness temperature and therefore the evolution bias. It also introduces a term that mimics white noise. These effects may influence forecasting analysis on ultra-large scales.
  • Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.
  • Measuring radio source counts is critical for characterizing new extragalactic populations, brings a wealth of science within reach and will inform forecasts for SKA and its pathfinders. Yet there is currently great debate (and few measurements) about the behaviour of the 1.4-GHz counts in the microJy regime. One way to push the counts to these levels is via 'stacking', the covariance of a map with a catalogue at higher resolution and (often) a different wavelength. For the first time, we cast stacking in a fully bayesian framework, applying it to (i) the SKADS simulation and (ii) VLA data stacked at the positions of sources from the VIDEO survey. In the former case, the algorithm recovers the counts correctly when applied to the catalogue, but is biased high when confusion comes into play. This needs to be accounted for in the analysis of data from any relatively-low-resolution SKA pathfinders. For the latter case, the observed radio source counts remain flat below the 5-sigma level of 85 microJy as far as 40 microJy, then fall off earlier than the flux hinted at by the SKADS simulations and a recent P(D) analysis (which is the only other measurement from the literature at these flux-density levels, itself extrapolated in frequency). Division into galaxy type via spectral-energy distribution reveals that normal spiral galaxies dominate the counts at these fluxes.
  • The exceptional sensitivity of the SKA will allow observations of the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization (CD/EoR) in unprecedented detail, both spectrally and spatially. This wealth of information is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, which must be removed accurately and precisely in order to reveal the cosmological signal. This problem has been addressed already for the previous generation of radio telescopes, but the application to SKA is different in many aspects. In this chapter we summarise the contributions to the field of foreground removal in the context of high redshift and high sensitivity 21-cm measurements. We use a state-of-the-art simulation of the SKA Phase 1 observations complete with cosmological signal, foregrounds and frequency-dependent instrumental effects to test both parametric and non-parametric foreground removal methods. We compare the recovered cosmological signal using several different statistics and explore one of the most exciting possibilities with the SKA --- imaging of the ionized bubbles. We find that with current methods it is possible to remove the foregrounds with great accuracy and to get impressive power spectra and images of the cosmological signal. The frequency-dependent PSF of the instrument complicates this recovery, so we resort to splitting the observation bandwidth into smaller segments, each of a common resolution. If the foregrounds are allowed a random variation from the smooth power law along the line of sight, methods exploiting the smoothness of foregrounds or a parametrization of their behaviour are challenged much more than non-parametric ones. However, we show that correction techniques can be implemented to restore the performances of parametric approaches, as long as the first-order approximation of a power law stands.
  • We present the science enabled by cross-correlations of the SKA1-LOW 21-cm EoR surveys with other line mapping programs. In particular, we identify and investigate potential synergies with planned programs, such as the line intensity mapping of redshifted CO rotational lines, [CII] and Ly-$\alpha$ emissions during reionization. We briefly describe how these tracers of the star-formation rate at $z \sim 8$ can be modeled jointly before forecasting their auto- and cross-power spectra measurements with the nominal 21cm EoR survey. The use of multiple line tracers would be invaluable to validate and enrich our understanding of the EoR.
  • Employing a nonparametric approach of the principal component analysis (PCA), we forecast the future constraint on the equation of state $w(z)$ of dark energy, and on the effective Newton constant $\mu(k,z)$, which parameterise the effect of modified gravity, using the planned SKA HI galaxy survey. Combining with the simulated data of Planck and Dark Energy Survey (DES), we find that SKA Phase 1 (SKA1) and SKA Phase 2 (SKA2) can well constrain $3$ and $5$ eigenmodes of $w(z)$ respectively. The errors of the best measured modes can be reduced to 0.04 and 0.023 for SKA1 and SKA2 respectively, making it possible to probe dark energy dynamics. On the other hand, SKA1 and SKA2 can constrain $7$ and $20$ eigenmodes of $\mu(k,z)$ respectively within 10\% sensitivity level. Furthermore, 2 and 7 modes can be constrained within sub percent level using SKA1 and SKA2 respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the combined datasets without SKA.
  • The SKA will build upon early detections of the EoR by precursor instruments, such as MWA, PAPER, and LOFAR, and planned instruments, such as HERA, to make the first high signal-to-noise measurements of fluctuations in the 21 cm brightness temperature from both reionization and the cosmic dawn. This will allow both imaging and statistical maps of the 21cm signal at redshifts z = 6 - 27 and constrain the underlying cosmology and evolution of the density field. This era includes nearly 60% of the (in principle) observable volume of the Universe and many more linear modes than the CMB, presenting an opportunity for SKA to usher in a new level of precision cosmology. This optimistic picture is complicated by the need to understand and remove the effect of astrophysics, so that systematics rather than statistics will limit constraints. This chapter describes the cosmological, as opposed to astrophysical, information available to SKA. Key areas for discussion include: cosmological parameters constraints using 21cm fluctuations as a tracer of the density field; lensing of the 21cm signal, constraints on heating via exotic physics such as decaying or annihilating dark matter; impact of fundamental physics such as non-Gaussianity or warm dark matter on the source population; and constraints on the bulk flows arising from the decoupling of baryons and photons at z = 1000. The chapter explores the path to separating cosmology from astrophysics, for example via velocity space distortions and separation in redshift. We discuss new opportunities for extracting cosmology made possible by the sensitivity of SKA Phase 1 and explores the advances achievable with SKA2.
  • We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.
  • Astronomy at or below the 'survey threshold' has expanded significantly since the publication of the original 'Science with the Square Kilometer Array' in 1999 and its update in 2004. The techniques in this regime may be broadly (but far from exclusively) defined as 'confusion' or 'P(D)' analyses (analyses of one-point statistics), and 'stacking', accounting for the flux-density distribution of noise-limited images co-added at the positions of objects detected/isolated in a different waveband. Here we discuss the relevant issues, present some examples of recent analyses, and consider some of the consequences for the design and use of surveys with the SKA and its pathfinders.
  • Twenty-one centimeter tomography is emerging as a powerful tool to explore the end of the cosmic dark ages and the reionization epoch, but it will only be as good as our ability to accurately model and remove astrophysical foreground contamination. Previous treatments of this problem have focused on the angular structure of the signal and foregrounds and what can be achieved with limited spectral resolution (bandwidths in the 1 MHz range). In this paper we introduce and evaluate a ``blind'' method to extract the multifrequency 21cm signal by taking advantage of the smooth frequency structure of the Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds. We find that 21 cm tomography is typically limited by foregrounds on scales $k\ll 1h/$Mpc and limited by noise on scales $k\gg 1h/$Mpc, provided that the experimental bandwidth can be made substantially smaller than 0.1 MHz. Our results show that this approach is quite promising even for scenarios with rather extreme contamination from point sources and diffuse Galactic emission, which bodes well for upcoming experiments such as LOFAR, MWA, PAST, and SKA.
  • Adams et al. (1997b) have noted that according to our current understanding of the unification of fundamental interactions, there should have been phase transitions associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking {\em during} the inflationary era. This may have resulted in the breaking of scale-invariance of the primordial density perturbation for brief periods. A possible such feature was identified in the power spectrum of galaxy clustering in the APM survey at the scale $k \sim 0.1 h$ Mpc^{-1} and it was shown that the secondary acoustic peaks in the power spectrum of the CMB anisotropy should consequently be suppressed. We demonstrate that this prediction is confirmed by the recent Boomerang and Maxima observations, which favour a step-like spectral feature in the range $k \sim (0.06-0.6)h$ Mpc^{-1}, independently of the similar previous indication from the APM data. Such a spectral break enables an excellent fit to both APM and CMB data with a baryon density consistent with the BBN value. It also allows the possibility of a matter-dominated universe with zero cosmological constant, which we show can now account for even the evolution of the abundance of rich clusters.