• (abbreviated) We investigate the spatial structure and spectral energy distribution of an edge-on circumstellar disk around an optically invisible young stellar object that is embedded in a dark cloud in the Carina Nebula. Whereas the object was detected as an apparently point-like source in earlier infrared observations, only the superb image quality (FWHM ~0.5") of our VLT / HAWK-I data could reveal, for the first time, its peculiar morphology. It consists of a very red point-like central source that is surrounded by a roughly spherical nebula, which is intersected by a remarkable dark lane through the center. We construct the spectral energy distribution of the object from 1 to 870 microns and perform a detailed radiative transfer modeling of the spectral energy distribution and the source morphology. The observed object morphology in the near-IR images clearly suggests a young stellar object that is embedded in an extended, roughly spherical envelope and surrounded by a large circumstellar disk with a diameter of ~5500 AU that is seen nearly edge-on. The radiative transfer modeling shows that the central object is a massive (10-15 Msun) young stellar object. The circumstellar disk has a mass of about 2 Msun. The disk object in Carina is one of the most massive young stellar objects for which a circumstellar disk has been detected so far, and the size and mass of the disk are very large compared to the corresponding values found for most other similar objects.
  • (abbreviated) We used HAWK-I at the ESO VLT to produce a near-infrared survey of the Carina Nebula that is deep enough to detect the full low-mass stellar population. The results of a recent deep X-ray survey are used to distinguish between young stars in Carina and background contaminants. We find that the ages of the low-mass stars (derived from color-magnitude diagrams of the invidual cluster in the Carina Nebula) agree with previous age estimates for the massive stars. About 3200 of the X-ray selected stars have masses >= 1 Msun; this number is in good agreement with extrapolations of the field IMF based on the number of high-mass stars and shows that there is no deficit of low-mass stars. The near-infrared excess fractions for the stellar populations in Carina are lower than typical for other, less massive clusters of similar age, suggesting a faster timescale of circumstellar disk dispersal than in the more quiescent regions, most likely due to the very high level of massive star feedback. Narrow-band images reveal six molecular hydrogen jets. However, none of the optical HH objects shows molecular hydrogen emission, suggesting that the jet-driving protostars are located very close to the edges of the globules in which they are embedded. This adds strong support to the scenario that their formation was triggered by the advancing ionization fronts.
  • Abbreviated Abstract: The near-infrared study of the Carina Nebula in this paper builds on the results of the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP), that detected 14368 X-ray sources in the 1.4 square-degree survey region, an automatic source classification study that classified 10714 of these as very likely young stars in Carina, and an analysis of their clustering properties. We used HAWK-I at the ESO VLT to conduct a very deep near-IR survey with sub-arcsecond angular resolution, covering about 1280 square-arcminutes. The HAWK-I images reveal more than 600000 individual infrared sources, whereby objects as faint as J ~ 23, H ~ 22, and Ks ~ 21 are detected at S/N >= 3. While less than half of the Chandra X-ray sources have counterparts in the 2MASS catalog, the ~5 mag deeper HAWK-I data reveal infrared counterparts to 6636 (= 88.8%) of the 7472 Chandra X-ray sources in the HAWK-I field. We analyze near-infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams to derive information about the extinctions, infrared excesses, ages, and masses of the X-ray selected objects. The near-infrared properties agree well with the results of the automatic X-ray source classification. The shape of the K-band luminosity function of the X-ray selected Carina members agrees well with that derived for the Orion Nebula Cluster, suggesting that, down to the X-ray detection limit around 0.5-1 Msun, the shape of the IMF in Carina is consistent with that in Orion (and thus the field IMF). The fraction of stars with near-infrared excesses is rather small, <=10%, but shows considerable variations between individual parts of the complex. The distribution of extinctions for the diskless stars ranges from ~1.6 mag to ~6.2 mag (central 80th percentile), clearly showing a considerable range of differential extinction between individual stars in the complex.
  • Trumpler 16 is a well--known rich star cluster containing the eruptive supergiant $\eta$ Carin\ae\ and located in the Carina star-forming complex. In the context of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, we study Trumpler 16 using new and archival X-ray data. A revised X-ray source list of the Trumpler 16 region contains 1232 X-ray sources including 1187 likely Carina members. These are matched to 1047 near-infrared counterparts detected by the HAWK-I instrument at the VLT allowing for better selection of cluster members. The cluster is irregular in shape. Although it is roughly circular, there is a high degree of sub-clustering, no noticeable central concentration and an extension to the southeast. The high--mass stars show neither evidence of mass segregation nor evidence of strong differential extinction. The derived power-law slope of the X-ray luminosity function for Trumpler 16 reveals a much steeper function than the Orion Nebula Cluster implying different ratio of solar- to higher-mass stars. We estimate the total Trumpler 16 pre-main sequence population to be > 6500 Class II and Class III X-ray sources. An overall K-excess disk frequency of ~ 8.9% is derived using the X-ray selected sample, although there is some variation among the sub-clusters, especially in the Southeastern extension. X-ray emission is detected from 29 high--mass stars with spectral types between B2 and O3.
  • Using the highest-resolution X-ray observation of the Trumpler 15 star cluster taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we estimate the total size of its stellar population by comparing the X-ray luminosity function of the detected sources to a calibrator cluster, and identify for the first time a significant fraction (~14%) of its individual members. The highest-resolution near-IR observation of Trumpler 15 (taken by the HAWK-I instrument on the VLT) was found to detect most of our X-ray selected sample of cluster members, with a K-excess disk frequency of 3.8+-0.7%. The near-IR data, X-ray luminosity function, and published spectral types of the brightest members support a cluster age estimate (5-10 Myr) that is older than those for the nearby Trumpler 14 and Trumpler 16 clusters, and suggest that high-mass members may have already exploded as supernovae. The morphology of the inner ~0.7 pc core of the cluster is found to be spherical. However, the outer regions (beyond 2 pc) are elongated, forming an `envelope' of stars that, in projection, appears to connect Trumpler 15 to Trumpler 14; this morphology supports the view that these clusters are physically associated. Clear evidence of mass segregation is seen. This study appears in a Special Issue of the ApJS devoted to the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP), a 1.42 square degree Chandra X-ray survey of the Great Nebula in Carina.
  • We present a catalog of ~14,000 X-ray sources observed by the ACIS instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory within a 1.42 square degree survey of the Great Nebula in Carina, known as the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). This study appears in a Special Issue of the ApJS devoted to the CCCP. Here, we describe the data reduction and analysis procedures performed on the X-ray observations, including calibration and cleaning of the X-ray event data, point source detection, and source extraction. The catalog appears to be complete across most of the field to an absorption-corrected total-band luminosity of ~10^{30.7} erg/s for a typical low-mass pre-main sequence star. Counterparts to the X-ray sources are identified in a variety of visual, near-infrared, and mid-infrared surveys. The X-ray and infrared source properties presented here form the basis of many CCCP studies of the young stellar populations in Carina.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • The discovery of Epsilon Indi Ba and Bb, a nearby binary brown dwarf system with a main-sequence companion, allows a concerted campaign to characterise the physical parameters of two T dwarfs providing benchmarks against which atmospheric and evolutionary models can be tested. Some recent observations suggest the models at low mass and intermediate age may not reflect reality with, however, few conclusive tests. We are carrying out a comprehensive characterisation of these, the nearest known brown dwarfs, to allow constraints to be placed upon models of cool field dwarfs. We present broadband photometry from the V- to M-band and the individual spectrum of both components from 0.6-5.1 microns at a resolution of up to R=5000. A custom analytic profile fitting routine was implemented to extract the blended spectra and photometry of both components separated by 0.7 arcsec. We confirm the spectral types to be T1 and T6, and notably, we do not detect lithium at 6708A in the more massive object which may be indicative both of the age of the system and the mass of the components.
  • T-type dwarfs present a broad and shallow absorption feature centred around 6950 A in the blue wing of the K doublet at 0.77 micron which resembles in depth and shape the satellite absorption predicted by detailed collisional broadening profiles. In our previous work, the predicted line satellite position was however somewhat too blue compared to the observed feature. In this paper we investigate whether new calculations of the energy surfaces of the potentials in the K-H_2 system, including spin-orbit coupling, result in a closer coincidence of the satellite with the observed position. We also investigate the extent to which CaH absorption bands contribute to the feature. We present model atmospheres and synthetic spectra, including gravitational settling for an improved description of depth-dependent abundances of refractory elements, and based on new K-H_2 line profiles using improved interaction potentials. By comparison with a high signal-to-noise optical spectrum of the T1 dwarf epsilon Indi Ba, we find that these new models do reproduce the observed feature, while CaH does not contribute for the atmospheric parameters considered. We also find that CaH is settled out so deep into the atmosphere that even turbulent vertical mixing would appear insufficient to bring significant amounts of CaH to the photosphere in dwarfs later than ~L5. We conclude that previous identification of the feature at this location in T and late L dwarf spectra with CaH was erroneous, as expected on physical grounds: calcium condenses onto grains in early L dwarfs and thus should have settled out of the photosphere in cooler brown dwarfs. This finding revokes one observational verification for the cloud-clearing theory: a gradual clearing of the cloud cover in early T dwarfs.
  • We report the discovery of a low-mass (0.26 +/- 0.02, 0.15 +/- 0.01 Msol) pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary with a 5.3 day orbital period. JW 380 was detected as part of a high-cadence time-resolved photometric survey (the Monitor project) using the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope and Wide Field Camera for a survey of a single field in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) region in V and i bands. The star is assigned a 99 per cent membership probability from proper motion measurements, and radial velocity observations indicate a systemic velocity within 1 sigma of that of the ONC. Modelling of the combined light and radial velocity curves of the system gave stellar radii of 1.19 +0.04 -0.18 Rsol and 0.90 +0.17 -0.03 Rsol for the primary and secondary, with a significant third light contribution which is also visible as a third peak in the cross-correlation functions used to derive radial velocities. The masses and radii appear to be consistent with stellar models for 2-3 Myr age from several authors, within the present observational errors. These observations probe an important region of mass-radius parameter space, where there are currently only a handful of known pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary systems with precise measurements available in the literature.
  • We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5 - 15 arcmin (0.65 - 2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13" - 1.12" (60 - 500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 M_sun is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from theta1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.
  • The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6m), cold (50K), infrared-optimized space observatory that will be launched early in the next decade. The observatory will have four instruments: a near-infrared camera, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph, and a tunable filter imager will cover the wavelength range, 0.6 to 5.0 microns, while the mid-infrared instrument will do both imaging and spectroscopy from 5.0 to 29 microns. The JWST science goals are divided into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the early universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and active nuclei within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present day. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall on to dust-enshrouded protostars to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems including our own, and investigate the potential for the origins of life in those systems. To enable these observations, JWST consists of a telescope, an instrument package, a spacecraft and a sunshield. The telescope consists of 18 beryllium segments, some of which are deployed. The segments will be brought into optical alignment on-orbit through a process of periodic wavefront sensing and control. The JWST operations plan is based on that used for previous space observatories, and the majority of JWST observing time will be allocated to the international astronomical community through annual peer-reviewed proposal opportunities.
  • We report the detection during the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) of two soft, constant, and faint X-ray sources associated with the Herbig-Haro object HH210. HH210 is located at the tip of the NNE finger of the emission line system bursting out of the BN-KL complex, northwest of the Trapezium cluster in the OMC-1 molecular cloud. Using a recent Halpha image obtained with the ACS imager on board HST, and taking into account the known proper motions of HH210 emission knots, we show that the position of the brightest X-ray source, COUP703, coincides with the emission knot 154-040a of HH210, which is the emission knot of HH210 having the highest tangential velocity (425 km/s). The second X-ray source, COUP704, is located on the complicated emission tail of HH210 close to an emission line filament and has no obvious optical/infrared counterpart. Spectral fitting indicates for both sources a plasma temperature of ~0.8 MK and absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities of about 1E30 erg/s (0.5-2.0 keV). These X-ray sources are well explained by a model invoking a fast-moving, radiative bow shock in a neutral medium with a density of ~12000 cm^{-3}. The X-ray detection of COUP704 therefore reveals, in the complicated HH210 region, an energetic shock not yet identified at other wavelengths.
  • We have mapped the SiO J=5-4 line at 217GHz from the HH211 molecular outflow with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The high resolution map (1.6''x0.9'') shows that the SiO J=5-4 emission comes from the central narrow jet along the outflow axis with a width of ~0.8'' (~250 AU) FWHM. The SiO jet consists of a chain of knots separated by 3-4'' (~1000 AU) and most of the SiO knots have counterparts in shocked H_2 emission seen in a new, deep VLT near-infrared image of the outflow. A new, innermost pair of knots are discovered at just +/-2'' from the central star. The line ratio between the SiO J=5-4 data and upper limits from the SiO J=1-0 data of Chandler & Richer (2001) suggests that these knots have a temperature in excess of 300-500 K and a density of (0.5-1) x10^7 cm^{-3}. The radial velocity measured for these knots is ~30 km/s, comparable to the maximum velocity seen in the entire jet. The high temperature, high density, and velocity structure observed in this pair of SiO knots suggest that they are closely related to the primary jet launched close to the protostar.
  • We use the sensitive X-ray data from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) to study the X-ray properties of 34 spectroscopically-identified brown dwarfs with near-infrared spectral types between M6 and M9 in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Nine of the 34 objects are clearly detected as X-ray sources. The apparently low detection rate is in many cases related to the substantial extinction of these brown dwarfs; considering only the BDs with $A_V \leq 5$ mag, nearly half of the objects (7 out of 16) are detected in X-rays. Our 10-day long X-ray lightcurves of these objects exhibit strong variability, including numerous flares. While one of the objects was only detected during a short flare, a statistical analysis of the lightcurves provides evidence for continuous (`quiescent') emission in addition to flares for all other objects. Of these, the $\sim$ M9 brown dwarf COUP 1255 = HC 212 is one of the coolest known objects with a clear detection of quiescent X-ray emission. The X-ray properties (spectra, fractional X-ray luminosities, flare rates) of these young brown dwarfs are similar to those of the low-mass stars in the ONC, and thus there is no evidence for changes in the magnetic activity around the stellar/substellar boundary, which lies at $\sim$ M6 for ONC sources. Since the X-ray properties of the young brown dwarfs are also similar to those of M6--M9 field stars, the key to the magnetic activity in very cool objects seems to be the effective temperature, which determines the degree of ionization in the atmosphere.
  • We have identified two late M dwarfs within 10 parsecs of the Sun, by cross-correlating the Luyten NLTT catalogue of stars with proper motions larger than 0.18 arcsec/yr, with objects lacking optical identification in the 2MASS data base. The 2MASS photometry was then combined with improved optical photometry obtained from the SuperCOSMOS Sky Surveys. The two objects (LP775-31 and LP655-48) have extremely red optical-to-infrared colours ((R-K)~7) and very bright infrared magnitudes (K_s<10): follow-up optical spectroscopy with the ESO 3.6-m telescope gave spectral types of M8.0 and M7.5 dwarfs, respectively. Comparison of their near-infrared magnitudes with the absolute magnitudes of known M8 and M7.5 dwarfs with measured trigonometric parallaxes yields spectroscopic distance estimates of 6.4+/-1.4 parsecs and 8.0+/-1.6 parsecs for LP775-31 and LP655-48, respectively. In contrast, Cruz & Reid (2002) recently determined spectral types of M6 for both objects, and commensurately larger distances of 11.3+/-1.3 parsecs and 15.3+/-2.6 parsecs. LP655-48 is also a bright X-ray source (1RXS J044022.8-053020). With only a few late M dwarfs previously known within 10 parsecs, these two objects represent an important addition to the census of the Solar neighbourhood.
  • We present a deep, high spatial resolution (0.35 arcsec FWHM), near-infrared (1-2.5 micron) imaging survey of the Eagle Nebula, M16, made with the VLT, centred on the famous elephant trunks. We compare these data with the existing HST optical images to search for evidence of ongoing or recent star formation in the trunks, and in particular in the 73 small evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) on their surface. We find that two of the three HST trunks have relatively massive YSOs in their tips. Most of the EGGs appear to be empty, but some 15% of them do show evidence for associated young low-mass stars or brown dwarfs: in particular, there is a small cluster of such sources seen at the head of the largest trunk.
  • We present new infrared data from a survey for embedded protostellar jets in the Orion A cloud. This survey makes use of the S(1) v = 1-0 line of molecular hydrogen at lambda = 2.12 mum to search for infrared jets deep inside the cloud and thus hidden from view at optical wavelengths. We present data on the three flows associated with the Herbig-Haro objects HH 43/38 & HH 64, HH 65, and the L1641-N giant flow. HH 43, HH 38 and HH 64 are part of one H_2 flow extending over at least 1.4 pc. We identify a deeply embedded 1.3 mm and IRAS source (HH 43 MMS1 = IRAS 05355-0709C) as the likely driving source, while the infrared source previously assumed to drive HH 43/38 (HH 43-IRS1 = IRAS 05357-0710) is seen to drive a smaller jet. The morphology of HH 43-IRS1 suggests that it is a star+disk system seen close to edge-on. We identify another large H_2 flow apparently comprising the L1641-S3 CO outflow and the redshifted lobe of the L1641-S CO outflow containing HH 65. This flow extends over at least 2.6 pc and appears strongly curved. It is driven by L1641-S3 IRS, a deeply embedded 1.3 mm and IRAS source (L1641-S3 MMS1 = IRAS 05375-0731). Finally, we have found some additional large H_2 features to the east of V 380 Ori and the HH 1/2 system, which probably outline another part of the L1641-N outflow. The molecular flow MB 20/21, which extends to the south from V 380 Ori, also appears to be a part of the L1641-N outflow.
  • We report the discovery of a pair of large Herbig-Haro type structures roughly 10 arcminutes (1.3 pc) north-east and south-west of the source driving the well-known HH 46/47 Herbig-Haro jet in new deep emission-line images made using the Wide Field Imager on the ESO/MPG La Silla 2.2-m telescope. These new images suggest that the HH 46/47 outflow is much more extensive than previously assumed, extending over a total of 2.6 pc on the sky, or over 3 pc in space, when deprojected. HH 46/47 thus also belongs to the recently-discovered class of giant Herbig-Haro flows.
  • We study the interpretation of the mean surface density of stellar companions as a function of separation (or the two point correlation function of stars) in star-forming regions. First, we consider the form of the functions for various simple stellar distributions (binaries, global density profiles, clusters, and fractals) and the effects of survey boundaries. Following this, we study the dependencies of the separation at which a transition from the binary to the large-scale clustering regime occurs. Larson (1995) found that the mean surface density of companions follows different power-law functions of separation in the two regimes. He identified the transition separation with the typical Jeans length in the molecular cloud. However, we show that this is valid only for special cases. In general, the transition separation depends on the volume density of stars, the depth of the star-forming region, the volume-filling nature of the stellar distribution, and on the parameters of the binaries. Furthermore, the transition separation evolves with time. We then apply these results to the Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, and Orion Trapezium star-forming regions. We find that while the transition separation in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region may indicate a typical Jeans length, this is not true of the Orion Trapezium Cluster. We also show that there is no evidence for sub-clustering or fractal structure in the stars of the Orion Trapezium Cluster. This is consistent with the fact that, if such structure were present when the stars formed, it would have been erased by the current age of the cluster due to the stellar velocity dispersion. [Abstract abridged]
  • We present the first high-resolution near-infrared images of the edge-on silhouette circumstellar disk, Orion 114-426, made using NICMOS on the Hubble Space Telescope. Images taken against the bright nebular background of the ionized hydrogen Pa$\alpha$ line at 1.87 micron show the major axis of the disk to be approximately 20% smaller than at 0.6 micron, from which we deduce the structure of the edge of the disk. Continuum images of diffuse polar lobes above and below the plane of the disk show a morphology and evolution with wavelength consistent with predictions for reflection nebulae in a diffuse envelope with large polar cavities, surrounding a thin, massless, Keplerian disk, centered on an otherwise hidden central star. We make use of our observations and reasonable assumptions about the underlying disk structure to show that the disk mass is at least 10 earth masses and plausibly $\geq 5\times 10^{-4}$ solar masses.
  • We present new images of the OMC-1 molecular hydrogen outflow, made using long-slit spectroscopy in order to accurately subtract the underlying continuum emission. These images reveal an extremely clumpy, quasi-spherical inner shell that breaks up at larger radii into bow-shocks and trailing wakes in the north-west, as originally described by Allen & Burton (1993); a fainter counter-finger to the south-east is newly discovered in the present data. While the outflow appears to be broadly bipolar, this is probably due to an interaction between an initially spherical wind from the source and a large-scale density enhancement surrounding it, rather than direct collimation imposed close to the source. The clumpy appearance of the inner shell confirms the prediction of the recent model of Stone, Xu, & Mundy (1995), in which a spherical and time-varying wind fragments a swept-up shell, producing high-velocity shrapnel, which in turn drives bow-shocks into the surrounding gas, resulting in the observed "fingers". As an alternative to the single varying source proposed by Stone et al., we speculate that several young sources in the BN-KL cluster may have been responsible for first sweeping up the shell and then fragmenting it.