• We present Glyph - a Python package for genetic programming based symbolic regression. Glyph is designed for usage let by numerical simulations let by real world experiments. For experimentalists, glyph-remote provides a separation of tasks: a ZeroMQ interface splits the genetic programming optimization task from the evaluation of an experimental (or numerical) run. Glyph can be accessed at http://github.com/ambrosys/glyph . Domain experts are be able to employ symbolic regression in their experiments with ease, even if they are not expert programmers. The reuse potential is kept high by a generic interface design. Glyph is available on PyPI and Github.
  • Networks of coupled dynamical systems provide a powerful way to model systems with enormously complex dynamics, such as the human brain. Control of synchronization in such networked systems has far reaching applications in many domains, including engineering and medicine. In this paper, we formulate the synchronization control in dynamical systems as an optimization problem and present a multi-objective genetic programming-based approach to infer optimal control functions that drive the system from a synchronized to a non-synchronized state and vice-versa. The genetic programming-based controller allows learning optimal control functions in an interpretable symbolic form. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated in controlling synchronization in coupled oscillator systems linked in networks of increasing order complexity, ranging from a simple coupled oscillator system to a hierarchical network of coupled oscillators. The results show that the proposed method can learn highly-effective and interpretable control functions for such systems.
  • Big data has become a critically enabling component of emerging mathematical methods aimed at the automated discovery of dynamical systems, where first principles modeling may be intractable. However, in many engineering systems, abrupt changes must be rapidly characterized based on limited, incomplete, and noisy data. Many leading automated learning techniques rely on unrealistically large data sets and it is unclear how to leverage prior knowledge effectively to re-identify a model after an abrupt change. In this work, we propose a conceptual framework to recover parsimonious models of a system in response to abrupt changes in the low-data limit. First, the abrupt change is detected by comparing the estimated Lyapunov time of the data with the model prediction. Next, we apply the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics (SINDy) regression to update a previously identified model with the fewest changes, either by addition, deletion, or modification of existing model terms. We demonstrate this sparse model recovery on several examples for abrupt system change detection in periodic and chaotic dynamical systems. Our examples show that sparse updates to a previously identified model perform better with less data, have lower runtime complexity, and are less sensitive to noise than identifying an entirely new model. The proposed abrupt-SINDy architecture provides a new paradigm for the rapid and efficient recovery of a system model after abrupt changes.
  • We investigate synchronization of coupled organ pipes. Synchronization and reflection in the organ lead to undesired weakening of the sound in special cases. Recent experiments have shown that sound interaction is highly complex and nonlinear, however, we show that two delay-coupled Van-der-Pol oscillators appear to be a good model for the occurring dynamical phenomena. Here the coupling is realized as distance-dependent, or time-delayed, equivalently. Analytically, we investigate the synchronization frequency and bifurcation scenarios which occur at the boundaries of the Arnold tongues. We successfully compare our results to experimental data.
  • We study the modeling and prediction of dynamical systems based on conventional models derived from measurements. Such algorithms are highly desirable in situations where the underlying dynamics are hard to model from physical principles or simplified models need to be found. We focus on symbolic regression methods as a part of machine learning. These algorithms are capable of learning an analytically tractable model from data, a highly valuable property. Symbolic regression methods can be considered as generalized regression methods. We investigate two particular algorithms, the so-called fast function extraction which is a generalized linear regression algorithm, and genetic programming which is a very general method. Both are able to combine functions in a certain way such that a good model for the prediction of the temporal evolution of a dynamical system can be identified. We illustrate the algorithms by finding a prediction for the evolution of a harmonic oscillator based on measurements, by detecting an arriving front in an excitable system, and as a real-world application, the prediction of solar power production based on energy production observations at a given site together with the weather forecast.
  • We present a novel experimental setup to investigate two-dimensional thermal convection in a freestanding thin liquid film. We develop a setup for the reproducible generation of freestanding thin liquid films. Such films can be produced in a controlled way on the scale of 5 to 1000 nanometers. Our primary goal is to investigate the statistics of reversals in Rayleigh-B\'enard convection with varying aspect ratio; here numerical works are quite expensive and 3D experiments prohibitively complicated and costly. However, as well questions regarding the physics of liquid films under controlled conditions can be investigated, like surface forces, or stability under varying thermodynamical parameters. The thin liquid film has a well-defined and -chosen chemistry in order to fit our particular requirements, it has a thickness to area ratio of approximately 10^8 and is supported by a frame which is adjustable in height and width to vary the aspect ratio from 0.16 to 10. The top and bottom frame elements can be set to specific temperature within T= 15-55{\deg}C. The ambient parameters of the thin film are carefully controlled to achieve reproducible results and allow a comparison to experimental and numerical data.
  • Thin liquid films are nanoscopic elements of foams, emulsions and suspensions, and form a paradigm for nanochannel transport that eventually test the limits of hydrodynamic descriptions. Here we use classical dynamical systems characteristics to study the complex interplay of thermal convection, interface and gravitational forces which yields turbulent mixing and transport: Lyapunov exponents and entropies. We induce a stable two eddy convection in an extremely thin liquid film by applying a temperature gradient. Experimentally, we determine the small-scale dynamics using the motion and deformation of spots of equal size/equal color, we dubbed that technique "color imaging velocimetry". The large-scale dynamics is captured by encoding the left/right motion of the liquid directed to the left or right of the separatrix between the two rolls. This way, we characterize chaos of course mixing in this peculiar fluid geometry of a thin, free-standing liquid film.
  • Turbulent shear flows have triggered fundamental research in nonlinear dynamics, like transition scenarios, pattern formation and dynamical modeling. In particular, the control of nonlinear dynamics is subject of research since decades. In this publication, actuated turbulent shear flows serve as test-bed for a nonlinear feedback control strategy which can optimize an arbitrary cost function in an automatic self-learning manner. This is facilitated by genetic programming providing an analytically treatable control law. Unlike control based on PID laws or neural networks, no structure of the control law needs to be specified in advance. The strategy is first applied to low-dimensional dynamical systems featuring aspects of turbulence and for which linear control methods fail. This includes stabilizing an unstable fixed point of a nonlinearly coupled oscillator model and maximizing mixing, i.e.\ the Lyapunov exponent, for forced Lorenz equations. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of genetic programming control to four shear flow experiments with strong nonlinearities and intrinsically noisy measurements. These experiments comprise mixing enhancement in a turbulent shear layer, the reduction of the recirculation zone behind a backward facing step, and the optimized reattachment of separating boundary layers. Genetic programming control has outperformed tested optimized state-of-the-art control and has even found novel actuation mechanisms.
  • A novel framework for closed-loop control of turbulent flows is tested in an experimental mixing layer flow. This framework, called Machine Learning Control (MLC), provides a model-free method of searching for the best function, to be used as a control law in closed-loop flow control. MLC is based on genetic programming, a function optimization method of machine learning. In this article, MLC is benchmarked against classical open-loop actuation of the mixing layer. Results show that this method is capable of producing sensor-based control laws which can rival or surpass the best open-loop forcing, and be robust to changing flow conditions. Additionally, MLC can detect non-linear mechanisms present in the controlled plant, and exploit them to find a better type of actuation than the best periodic forcing.
  • A novel, model free, approach to experimental closed-loop flow control is implemented on a separated flow. Feedback control laws are generated using genetic programming where they are optimized using replication, mutation and cross-over of best performing laws to produce a new generation of candidate control laws. This optimization process is applied automatically to a backward-facing step flow at Re=1350, controlled by a slotted jet, yielding an effective control law. Convergence criterion are suggested. The law is able to produce effective action even with major changes in the flow state, demonstrating its robustness. The underlying physical mechanisms leveraged by the law are analyzed and discussed. Contrary to traditional periodic forcing of the shear layer, this new control law plays on the physics of the recirculation area downstream the step. While both control actions are fundamentally different they still achieve the same level of effectiveness. Furthermore the new law is also potentially easier and cheaper to implement actuator wise.
  • We propose a general model-free strategy for feedback control design of turbulent flows. This strategy called 'machine learning control' (MLC) is capable of exploiting nonlinear mechanisms in a systematic unsupervised manner. It relies on an evolutionary algorithm that is used to evolve an ensemble of feedback control laws until minimization of a targeted cost function. This methodology can be applied to any non-linear multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system to derive an optimal closed-loop control law. MLC is successfully applied to the stabilization of nonlinearly coupled oscillators exhibiting frequency cross-talk, to the maximization of the largest Lyapunov exponent of a forced Lorenz system, and to the mixing enhancement in an experimental mixing layer flow. We foresee numerous potential applications to most nonlinear MIMO control problems, particularly in experiments.
  • Wind-driven sound generation is a source of anger and pleasure, depending on the situation: airframe and car noise, or combustion noise are some of the most disturbing environmental pollutions, whereas musical instruments are sources of joy. We present an experiment on two coupled sound sources -organ pipes- together with a theoretical model which takes into account the underlying physics. Our focus is the Arnold tongue which quantitatively captures the interaction of the sound sources, we obtain very good agreement of model and experiment, the results are supported by very detailed CFD computations.
  • We propose a general strategy for feedback control design of complex dynamical systems exploiting the nonlinear mechanisms in a systematic unsupervised manner. These dynamical systems can have a state space of arbitrary dimension with finite number of actuators (multiple inputs) and sensors (multiple outputs). The control law maps outputs into inputs and is optimized with respect to a cost function, containing physics via the dynamical or statistical properties of the attractor to be controlled. Thus, we are capable of exploiting nonlinear mechanisms, e.g. chaos or frequency cross-talk, serving the control objective. This optimization is based on genetic programming, a branch of machine learning. This machine learning control is successfully applied to the stabilization of nonlinearly coupled oscillators and maximization of Lyapunov exponent of a forced Lorenz system. We foresee potential applications to most nonlinear multiple inputs/multiple outputs control problems, particulary in experiments.
  • Films are nanoscopic elements of foams, emulsions and suspensions, and form a paradigm for nanochannel transport that eventually tests the limits of hydrodynamic descriptions. Here, we study the collapse of a freestanding film to its equilibrium. The generation of nanoscale films usually is a slow linear process; using thermal forcing we find unprecedented dynamics with exponentially fast thinning. The complex interplay of thermal convection, interface and gravitational forces yields optimal turbulent mixing and transport. Domains of collapsed film are generated, elongated and convected in a beautiful display of chaotic mixing. With a timescale analysis we identify mixing as the dominant dynamical process responsible for exponential thinning.
  • This fluid dynamics video demonstrates an experiment on superfast thinning of a freestanding thin aqueous film. The production of such films is of fundamental interest for interfacial sciences and the applications in nanoscience. The stable phase of the film is of the order $5-50\,nm$; nevertheless thermal convection can be established which changes qualitatively the thinning behavior from linear to exponentially fast. The film is thermally driven on one spot by a very cold needle, establishing two convection rolls at a Rayleigh number of $10^7$. This in turn enforces thermal and mechanical fluctuations which change the thinning behavior in a peculiar way, as shown in the video.
  • Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.
  • The grand piano is one of the most important instruments in western music. Its functioning and details are investigated and understood to a reasonable level, however, differences between manufacturers exist which are hard to explain. To add a new piece of understanding, we decided to investigate the effect of ribs mounted on a soundboard. Apart from pianos, this is important to a wider class of instruments which radiate from a structured surface. From scattering theory, it is well-known that a regular array of scatterers yields a band structure. By a systematic study of the latter, the effect of the ribs on the radiated spectrum is demonstrated for a specially manufactured multichord mimicking topologically a piano soundboard. To distinguish between radiated sound and sound propagated inside the board we use piezopolymers, an innovative, non-invasive technique. As a result we find a dramatic change in the spectrum allowed to propagate in the soundboard which is consequently radiated. An explanation by a simple model of coupled oscillators is given with a very nice qualitative coincidence.
  • Sound generation and -interaction is highly complex, nonlinear and self-organized. Already 150 years ago Lord Rayleigh raised the following problem: Two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory (M. Abel et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 119(4), 2006). For a detailed, quantitative investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization -- the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a specific nonlinear reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.
  • In the context of the analysis of measured data, one is often faced with the task to differentiate data numerically. Typically, this occurs when measured data are concerned or data are evaluated numerically during the evolution of partial or ordinary differential equations. Usually, one does not take care for accuracy of the resulting estimates of derivatives because modern computers are assumed to be accurate to many digits. But measurements yield intrinsic errors, which are often much less accurate than the limit of the machine used, and there exists the effect of ``loss of significance'', well known in numerical mathematics and computational physics. The problem occurs primarily in numerical subtraction, and clearly, the estimation of derivatives involves the approximation of differences. In this article, we discuss several techniques for the estimation of derivatives. As a novel aspect, we divide into local and global methods, and explain the respective shortcomings. We have developed a general scheme for global methods, and illustrate our ideas by spline smoothing and spectral smoothing. The results from these less known techniques are confronted with the ones from local methods. As typical for the latter, we chose Savitzky-Golay filtering and finite differences. Two basic quantities are used for characterization of results: The variance of the difference of the true derivative and its estimate, and as important new characteristic, the smoothness of the estimate. We apply the different techniques to numerically produced data and demonstrate the application to data from an aeroacoustic experiment. As a result, we find that global methods are generally preferable if a smooth process is considered. For rough estimates local methods work acceptably well.
  • We develop a theory describing the transition to a spatially homogeneous regime in a mixing flow with a chaotic in time reaction. The transverse Lyapunov exponent governing the stability of the homogeneous state can be represented as a combination of Lyapunov exponents for spatial mixing and temporal chaos. This representation, being exact for time-independent flows and equal P\'eclet numbers of different components, is demonstrated to work accurately for time-dependent flows and different P\'eclet numbers.
  • We present a nonparametric way to retrieve a system of differential equations in embedding space from a single time series. These equations can be treated with dynamical systems theory and allow for long term predictions. We demonstrate the potential of our approach for a modified chaotic Chua oscillator.