• We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present an analysis of X-ray, Ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital modulation found in previous studies after the state change, also reveal an energy dependence of the amplitudes as well as variations on time scale of months. The amplitude variations are anti-correlated in the X-ray and the UV/optical bands. The average X-ray spectrum is described by a power law with \Gamma index of 1.07(8) without requiring an additional thermal component. The power law index \Gamma varies from 1.2 to 1.0 between superior and inferior conjunction of the neutron star. We interpret the observed X-ray behaviour in terms of synchrotron radiation emitted in an extended intrabinary shock, located between the pulsar and the donor star, which is eclipsed due to the companion orbital motion. The G5 type donor dominates the UV/optical and near-IR emission and is similarly found to be heated up to ? 6500K as in the disc state. The analysis of optical light curves gives a binary inclination 46 < i < 65deg and a mass ratio 0.11 < q <0.26. The donor mass is found to be 0.15 < M2 < 0.36Msun for a neutron star mass of 1.4Msun. The variations in the amplitude of the orbital modulation are interpreted in terms of small changes in the mass flow rate from the donor star. The spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma-rays is composed by multiple contributions that are different from those observed during the accretion-powered state.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • The pulsar PSR J1756$-$2251 resides in a relativistic double neutron star (DNS) binary system with a 7.67-hr orbit. We have conducted long-term precision timing on more than 9 years of data acquired from five telescopes, measuring five post-Keplerian parameters. This has led to several independent tests of general relativity (GR), the most constraining of which shows agreement with the prediction of GR at the 4% level. Our measurement of the orbital decay rate disagrees with that predicted by GR, likely due to systematic observational biases. We have derived the pulsar distance from parallax and orbital decay measurements to be 0.73$_{-0.24}^{+0.60}$ kpc (68%) and < 1.2 kpc (95% upper limit), respectively; these are significantly discrepant from the distance estimated using Galactic electron density models. We have found the pulsar mass to be 1.341$\pm$0.007 M$_\odot$, and a low neutron star (NS) companion mass of 1.230$\pm$0.007 M$_\odot$. We also determined an upper limit to the spin-orbit misalignment angle of 34{\deg} (95%) based on a system geometry fit to long-term profile width measurements. These and other observed properties have led us to hypothesize an evolution involving a low mass loss, symmetric supernova progenitor to the second-formed NS companion, as is thought to be the case for the double pulsar system PSR J0737$-$3039A/B. This would make PSR J1756$-$2251 the second compact binary system providing concrete evidence for this type of NS formation channel.
  • The double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B, discovered with the Parkes radio telescope in 2003, is one of the most intriguing pulsar findings of the last decade. This binary system, with an orbital period of only 2.4-hr and with the simultaneous presence of two radio pulsed signals, provides a truly unique laboratory for relativistic gravity and plasma physics. Moreover its discovery enhances of almost an order of magnitude the estimate of the merger rate of double neutron stars systems, opening new possibilities for the current generation of gravitational wave detectors. In this contribution we summarise the present results and look at the prospects of future observations.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of the radio magnetar PSR J1622-4950 and its environment. Observations of PSR J1622-4950 with Chandra (in 2007 and 2009) and XMM (in 2011) show that the X-ray flux of PSR J1622-4950 has decreased by a factor of ~50 over 3.7 years, decaying exponentially with a characteristic time of 360 +/- 11 days. This behavior identifies PSR J1622-4950 as a possible addition to the small class of transient magnetars. The X-ray decay likely indicates that PSR J1622-4950 is recovering from an X-ray outburst that occurred earlier in 2007, before the 2007 Chandra observations. Observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array show strong radio variability, including a possible radio flaring event at least one and a half years after the 2007 X-ray outburst that may be a direct result of this X-ray event. Radio observations with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope reveal that PSR J1622-4950 is 8' southeast of a diffuse radio arc, G333.9+0.0, which appears non-thermal in nature and which could possibly be a previously undiscovered supernova remnant. If G333.9+0.0 is a supernova remnant then the estimates of its size and age, combined with the close proximity and reasonable implied velocity of PSR J1622-4950, suggests that these two objects could be physically associated.
  • We present the evolution of the radio emission from the 2.8-s pulsar of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B. We provide an update on the Burgay et al. (2005) analysis by describing the changes in the pulse profile and flux density over five years of observations, culminating in the B pulsar's radio disappearance in 2008 March. Over this time, the flux density decreases by 0.177 mJy/yr at the brightest orbital phases and the pulse profile evolves from a single to a double peak, with a separation rate of 2.6 deg/yr. The pulse profile changes are most likely caused by relativistic spin precession, but can not be easily explained with a circular hollow-cone beam as in the model of Clifton & Weisberg (2008). Relativistic spin precession, coupled with an elliptical beam, can model the pulse profile evolution well. This particular beam shape predicts geometrical parameters for the two bright orbital phases which are consistent and similar to those derived by Breton et al. (2008). However, the observed decrease in flux over time and B's eventual disappearance cannot be easily explained by the model and may be due to the changing influence of A on B.
  • As part of a survey for radio pulsars with the Parkes 64-m telescope we have discovered PSR J1622-4950, a pulsar with a 4.3-s rotation period. Follow-up observations show that the pulsar has the highest inferred surface magnetic field of the known radio pulsars (B ~ 3e14 G), exhibits significant timing noise and appears to have an inverted spectrum. Unlike the vast majority of the known pulsar population, PSR J1622-4950 appears to switch off for many hundreds of days and even in its on-state exhibits extreme variability in its flux density. Furthermore, the integrated pulse profile changes shape with epoch. All of these properties are remarkably similar to the only two magnetars previously known to emit radio pulsations. The position of PSR J1622-4950 is coincident with an X-ray source that, unlike the other radio pulsating magnetars, was found to be in quiescence. We conclude that our newly discovered pulsar is a magnetar - the first to be discovered via its radio emission.
  • In 2003 a previously unpulsed Einstein and ROSAT source cataloged as soft and dim (Lx of few 10^33 ergs) thermal emitting object, namely XTE J1810-197, was identified as the first unambiguous transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar. Two years later this source was also found to be a bright highly polarized transient radio pulsar, a unique property among both AXPs and radio pulsars. In September 2006 the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) detected an intense burst from the candidate AXP CXOU J164710.2-455216, which entered in an outburst state reaching a peak emission of at least a factor of 300 higher than quiescence. Here, we briefly outline the recent results concerning the outburst phenomena observed in these two AXPs. In particular, XTE J1810-197 has probed to be a unique laboratory to monitor the timing and spectral properties of a cooling/fading AXP, while new important information have been inferred from X-ray and radio band simultaneous observations. CXOU J164710.2-455216 has been monitored in X-rays and radio bands since the very beginning of its outbursting state allowing us to cover the first phases of the outburst and to study the timing and spectral behavior during the first months.
  • We present an evolutionary scenario for the spin-up and evolution of binary millisecond pulsars, according to which the companion of the pulsar PSR J 1740-5340, recently discovered as a binary with orbital period of 32.5 hr in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397, is presently in a phase of ``radio-ejection'' mass loss from the system. At present, Roche lobe overflow due to the nuclear evolution of the pulsar companion and to systemic angular momentum losses by magnetic braking is still going on, but accretion is inhibited by the momentum exerted by the radiation of the pulsar on the matter at the inner Lagrangian point. The presence of this matter around the system is consistent with the long lasting irregular radio eclipses seen in the system. Roche lobe deformation of the mass losing component is also necessary to be compatible with the optical light curve. The "radio-ejection" phase had been recently postulated by us to deal with the problem of the lack of submillisecond pulsars (Burderi et al. 2001, ApJ, 560, L71).
  • We present a scenario for the spin-up and evolution of binary millisecond pulsars. This can explain the observational properties of the recently discovered binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1740-5340, with orbital period 32.5 hrs, in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397. The optical counterpart of this system is a star as luminous as the cluster turnoff stars, but with a lower Teff (a larger radius) which we model with a star of initial mass compatible with the masses evolving in the cluster (~0.85 Msun). This star has suffered Roche lobe overflow while evolving off the main sequence, spinning up the neutron star to the present period of 3.65 ms. There are evidences that at present, Roche lobe overflow is still going on. Indeed Roche lobe deformation of the mass losing component is necessary to be compatible with the optical light curve. The presence of matter around the system is also consistent with the long lasting irregular radio eclipses seen in the system. We propose that this system is presently in a phase of `radio-ejection' mass loss. The radio-ejection phase can be initiated only if the system is subject to intermittency in the mass transfer during the spin-up phase. In fact, when the system is detached the pulsar radio emission is not quenched, and may be able to prevent further mass accretion due to the action of the pulsar pressure at the inner Lagrangian point.