• Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.
  • We present the science enabled by cross-correlations of the SKA1-LOW 21-cm EoR surveys with other line mapping programs. In particular, we identify and investigate potential synergies with planned programs, such as the line intensity mapping of redshifted CO rotational lines, [CII] and Ly-$\alpha$ emissions during reionization. We briefly describe how these tracers of the star-formation rate at $z \sim 8$ can be modeled jointly before forecasting their auto- and cross-power spectra measurements with the nominal 21cm EoR survey. The use of multiple line tracers would be invaluable to validate and enrich our understanding of the EoR.
  • This chapter describes the assumed specifications and sensitivities for HI galaxy surveys with SKA1 and SKA2. It addresses the expected galaxy number densities based on available simulations as well as the clustering bias over the underlying dark matter. It is shown that a SKA1 HI galaxy survey should be able to find around $5\times 10^6$ galaxies over 5,000 deg$^2$ (up to $z\sim 0.8$), while SKA2 should find $\sim 10^9$ galaxies over 30,000 deg$^2$ (up to $z\sim 2.5$). The numbers presented here have been used throughout the cosmology chapters for forecasting.
  • The intensity mapping of Ly-alpha emission during the epoch of reionization (EoR) will be contaminated by foreground emission lines from lower redshifts. We calculate the mean intensity and power spectrum of Ly-alpha emission at z~7, and estimate the uncertainties according to the relevant astrophysical processes. We find that the low-redshift emission lines from 6563 A H-alpha, 5007 A [OIII] and 3727 A [OII] will be the strong contaminants on the observed Ly-alpha power spectrum. We make use of both the star formation rate (SFR) and luminosity functions (LF) to estimate the mean intensity and power spectra of the three foreground lines at z~0.5 for H-alpha, z~0.9 for [OIII] and z~1.6 for [OII], as they will contaminate the Ly-alpha emission at z~7. The [OII] line is found to be the strongest. We analyze the masking of the bright survey pixels with a foreground line above some line intensity threshold as a way to reduce the contamination in the intensity mapping survey. We find that the foreground contamination can be neglected if we remove the pixels with fluxes above 1.4x10^-20 W/m^2.
  • The atomic CII fine-structure line is one of the brightest lines in a typical star-forming galaxy spectrum with a luminosity ~ 0.1% to 1% of the bolometric luminosity. It is potentially a reliable tracer of the dense gas distribution at high redshifts and could provide an additional probe to the era of reionization. By taking into account of the spontaneous, stimulated and collisional emission of the CII line, we calculate the spin temperature and the mean intensity as a function of the redshift. When averaged over a cosmologically large volume, we find that the CII emission from ionized carbon in individual galaxies is larger than the signal generated by carbon in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Assuming that the CII luminosity is proportional to the carbon mass in dark matter halos, we also compute the power spectrum of the CII line intensity at various redshifts. In order to avoid the contamination from CO rotational lines at low redshift when targeting a CII survey at high redshifts, we propose the cross-correlation of CII and 21-cm line emission from high redshifts. To explore the detectability of the CII signal from reionization, we also evaluate the expected errors on the CII power spectrum and CII-21 cm cross power spectrum based on the design of the future milimeter surveys. We note that the CII-21 cm cross power spectrum contains interesting features that captures physics during reionization, including the ionized bubble sizes and the mean ionization fraction, which are challenging to measure from 21-cm data alone. We propose an instrumental concept for the reionization CII experiment targeting the frequency range of $\sim$ 200 to 300 GHz with 1, 3 and 10 meter apertures and a bolometric spectrometer array with 64 independent spectral pixels with about 20,000 bolometers.
  • The large-scale structure of the Universe can be mapped with unresolved intensity fluctuations of the 21 cm line. The power spectrum of the intensity fluctuations has been proposed as a probe of the baryon acoustic oscillations at low to moderate redshifts with interferometric experiments now under consideration. We discuss the contamination to the low-redshift 21 cm intensity power spectrum generated by the 18 cm OH line since the intensity fluctuations of the OH line generated at a slightly higher redshift contribute to the intensity fluctuations observed in an experiment. We assume the OH megamaser luminosity is correlated with the star formation rate, and use the simulation to estimate the OH signal and the spatial anisotropies. We also use a semi-analytic simulation to predict the 21 cm power spectrum. At z=1 to 3, we find that the OH contamination could reach 0.1% to 1% of the 21 cm rms fluctuations at the scale of the first peak of the baryon acoustic oscillation. When z>3 the OH signal declines quickly, so that the contamination on the 21-cm becomes negligible at high redshifts.