• It was shown by Grohe et al. that nowhere dense classes of graphs admit sparse neighbourhood covers of small degree. We show that a monotone graph class admits sparse neighbourhood covers if and only if it is nowhere dense. The existence of such covers for nowhere dense classes is established through bounds on so-called weak colouring numbers. The core results of this paper are various lower and upper bounds on the weak colouring numbers and other, closely related generalised colouring numbers. We prove tight bounds for these numbers on graphs of bounded tree width. We clarify and tighten the relation between the expansion (in the sense of "bounded expansion" as defined by Nesetril and Ossona de Mendez) and the various generalised colouring numbers. These upper bounds are complemented by new, stronger exponential lower bounds on the generalised colouring numbers. Finally, we show that computing weak r-colouring numbers is NP-complete for all r>2.
  • Luks's algorithm (JCSS 1982) to test isomorphism of bounded degree graphs in polynomial time is one of the most important results in the context of the Graph Isomorphism Problem and has been repeatedly used as a basic building block for many other algorithms. In particular, for graphs of logarithmic degree, Babai's quasipolynomial isomorphism test (STOC 2016) essentially boils down to Luks's algorithm, and any improvement of Babai's algorithm requires an improved isomorphism test for graphs of (poly)logarithmic degree. In this work, we obtain such an improvement: we give an algorithm that solves the Graph Isomorphism Problem in time $n^{\mathcal{O}((\log d)^{c})}$, where $n$ is the number of vertices of the input graphs, $d$ is the maximum degree of the input graphs, and $c$ is an absolute constant. The best previous isomorphism test for graphs of maximum degree $d$ due to Babai, Kantor and Luks (FOCS 1983) runs in time $n^{\mathcal{O}(d/ \log d)}$. Our result generalizes the quasipolynomial-time algorithm for the general isomorphism problem due to Babai.
  • We give a new fpt algorithm testing isomorphism of $n$-vertex graphs of tree width $k$ in time $2^{k\operatorname{polylog} (k)}\operatorname{poly} (n)$, improving the fpt algorithm due to Lokshtanov, Pilipczuk, Pilipczuk, and Saurabh (FOCS 2014), which runs in time $2^{\mathcal{O}(k^5\log k)}\operatorname{poly} (n)$. Based on an improved version of the isomorphism-invariant graph decomposition technique introduced by Lokshtanov et al., we prove restrictions on the structure of the automorphism groups of graphs of tree width $k$. Our algorithm then makes heavy use of the group theoretic techniques introduced by Luks (JCSS 1982) in his isomorphism test for bounded degree graphs and Babai (STOC 2016) in his quasipolynomial isomorphism test. In fact, we even use Babai's algorithm as a black box in one place. We also give a second algorithm which, at the price of a slightly worse running time $2^{\mathcal{O}(k^2 \log k)}\operatorname{poly} (n)$, avoids the use of Babai's algorithm and, more importantly, has the additional benefit that it can also used as a canonization algorithm.
  • We prove that for every positive integer $k$, there exists an $\text{MSO}_1$-transduction that given a graph of linear cliquewidth at most $k$ outputs, nondeterministically, some clique decomposition of the graph of width bounded by a function of $k$. A direct corollary of this result is the equivalence of the notions of $\text{CMSO}_1$-definability and recognizability on graphs of bounded linear cliquewidth.
  • We establish new, and surprisingly tight, connections between propositional proof complexity and finite model theory. Specifically, we show that the power of several propositional proof systems, such as Horn resolution, bounded-width resolution, and the polynomial calculus of bounded degree, can be characterised in a precise sense by variants of fixed-point logics that are of fundamental importance in descriptive complexity theory. Our main results are that Horn resolution has the same expressive power as least fixed-point logic, that bounded-width resolution captures existential least fixed-point logic, and that the polynomial calculus with bounded degree over the rationals solves precisely the problems definable in fixed-point logic with counting. By exploring these connections further, we establish finite-model-theoretic tools for proving lower bounds for the polynomial calculus over the rationals and over finite fields.
  • In this paper, we relate a beautiful theory by Lov\'asz with a popular heuristic algorithm for the graph isomorphism problem, namely the color refinement algorithm and its $k$-dimensional generalization known as the Weisfeiler-Leman algorithm. We prove that two graphs $G$ and $H$ are indistinguishable by the color refinement algorithm if and only if, for all trees $T$, the number $\mathsf{hom}(T,G)$ of homomorphisms from $T$ to $G$ equals the corresponding number $\mathsf{hom}(T,H)$ for $H$. There is a natural system of linear equations whose nonnegative integer solutions correspond to the isomorphisms between two graphs. The non-negative real solutions to this system are called fractional isomorphisms, and two graphs are fractionally isomorphic if and only if the color refinement algorithm cannot distinguish them (Tinhofer 1986, 1991). We show that, if we drop the non-negativity constraints, that is, if we look for arbitrary real solutions, then a solution to the linear system exists if and only if, for all $t$, the two graphs have the same number of length-$t$ walks. We lift the results for trees to an equivalence between numbers of homomorphisms from graphs of tree width $k$, the $k$-dimensional Weisfeiler-Leman algorithm, and the level-$k$ Sherali-Adams relaxation of our linear program. We also obtain a partial result for graphs of path width $k$ and solutions to our system where we drop the non-negativity constraints. A consequence of our results is a quasi-linear time algorithm to decide whether, for two given graphs $G$ and $H$, there is a tree $T$ with $\mathsf{hom}(T,G)\neq\mathsf{hom}(T,H)$.
  • The graph similarity problem, also known as approximate graph isomorphism or graph matching problem, has been extensively studied in the machine learning community, but has not received much attention in the algorithms community: Given two graphs $G,H$ of the same order $n$ with adjacency matrices $A_G,A_H$, a well-studied measure of similarity is the Frobenius distance \[ \mathrm{dist}(G,H):=\min_{\pi}\|A_G^\pi-A_H\|_F, \] where $\pi$ ranges over all permutations of the vertex set of $G$, where $A_G^\pi$ denotes the matrix obtained from $A_G$ by permuting rows and columns according to $\pi$, and where $\|M\|_F$ is the Frobenius norm of a matrix $M$. The (weighted) graph similarity problem, denoted by SIM (WSIM), is the problem of computing this distance for two graphs of same order. This problem is closely related to the notoriously hard quadratic assignment problem (QAP), which is known to be NP-hard even for severely restricted cases. It is known that SIM (WSIM) is NP-hard; we strengthen this hardness result by showing that the problem remains NP-hard even for the class of trees. Identifying the boundary of tractability for WSIM is best done in the framework of linear algebra. We show that WSIM is NP-hard as long as one of the matrices has unbounded rank or negative eigenvalues: hence, the realm of tractability is restricted to positive semi-definite matrices of bounded rank. Our main result is a polynomial time algorithm for the special case where one of the matrices has a bounded clustering number, a parameter arising from spectral graph drawing techniques.
  • We study the classification problems over string data for hypotheses specified by formulas of monadic second-order logic MSO. The goal is to design learning algorithms that run in time polynomial in the size of the training set, independently of or at least sublinear in the size of the whole data set. We prove negative as well as positive results. If the data set is an unprocessed string to which our algorithms have local access, then learning in sublinear time is impossible even for hypotheses definable in a small fragment of first-order logic. If we allow for a linear time pre-processing of the string data to build an index data structure, then learning of MSO-definable hypotheses is possible in time polynomial in the size of the training set, independently of the size of the whole data set.
  • We study an extension of first-order logic that allows to express cardinality conditions in a similar way as SQL's COUNT operator. The corresponding logic FOC(P) was introduced by Kuske and Schweikardt (LICS'17), who showed that query evaluation for this logic is fixed-parameter tractable on classes of structures (or databases) of bounded degree. In the present paper, we first show that the fixed-parameter tractability of FOC(P) cannot even be generalised to very simple classes of structures of unbounded degree such as unranked trees or strings with a linear order relation. Then we identify a fragment FOC1(P) of FOC(P) which is still sufficiently strong to express standard applications of SQL's COUNT operator. Our main result shows that query evaluation for FOC1(P) is fixed-parameter tractable with almost linear running time on nowhere dense classes of structures. As a corollary, we also obtain a fixed-parameter tractable algorithm for counting the number of tuples satisfying a query over nowhere dense classes of structures.
  • The dichotomy conjecture for the parameterized embedding problem states that the problem of deciding whether a given graph $G$ from some class $K$ of "pattern graphs" can be embedded into a given graph $H$ (that is, is isomorphic to a subgraph of $H$) is fixed-parameter tractable if $K$ is a class of graphs of bounded tree width and $W[1]$-complete otherwise. Towards this conjecture, we prove that the embedding problem is $W[1]$-complete if $K$ is the class of all grids or the class of all walls.
  • We consider a declarative framework for machine learning where concepts and hypotheses are defined by formulas of a logic over some background structure. We show that within this framework, concepts defined by first-order formulas over a background structure of at most polylogarithmic degree can be learned in polylogarithmic time in the "probably approximately correct" learning sense.
  • In recent years, we have seen several approaches to the graph isomorphism problem based on "generic" mathematical programming or algebraic (Gr\"obner basis) techniques. For most of these, lower bounds have been established. In fact, it has been shown that the pairs of nonisomorphic CFI-graphs (introduced by Cai, F\"urer, and Immerman in 1992 as hard examples for the combinatorial Weisfeiler-Leman algorithm) cannot be distinguished by these mathematical algorithms. A notable exception were the algebraic algorithms over the field GF(2), for which no lower bound was known. Another, in some way even stronger, approach to graph isomorphism testing is based on solving systems of linear Diophantine equations (that is, linear equations over the integers), which is known to be possible in polynomial time. So far, no lower bounds for this approach were known. Lower bounds for the algebraic algorithms can best be proved in the framework of proof complexity, where they can be phrased as lower bounds for algebraic proof systems such as Nullstellensatz or the (more powerful) polynomial calculus. We give new hard examples for these systems: families of pairs of non-isomorphic graphs that are hard to distinguish by polynomial calculus proofs simultaneously over all prime fields, including GF(2), as well as examples that are hard to distinguish by the systems-of-linear-Diophantine-equations approach. In a previous paper, we observed that the CFI-graphs are closely related to what we call "group CSPs": constraint satisfaction problems where the constraints are membership tests in some coset of a subgroup of a cartesian power of a base group (Z_2 in the case of the classical CFI-graphs). Our new examples are also based on group CSPs (for Abelian groups), but here we extend the CSPs by a few non-group constraints to obtain even harder instances for graph isomorphism.
  • Order-invariant formulas access an ordering on a structure's universe, but the model relation is independent of the used ordering. Order invariance is frequently used for logic-based approaches in computer science. Order-invariant formulas capture unordered problems of complexity classes and they model the independence of the answer to a database query from low-level aspects of databases. We study the expressive power of order-invariant monadic second-order (MSO) and first-order (FO) logic on restricted classes of structures that admit certain forms of tree decompositions (not necessarily of bounded width). While order-invariant MSO is more expressive than MSO and, even, CMSO (MSO with modulo-counting predicates), we show that order-invariant MSO and CMSO are equally expressive on graphs of bounded tree width and on planar graphs. This extends an earlier result for trees due to Courcelle. Moreover, we show that all properties definable in order-invariant FO are also definable in MSO on these classes. These results are applications of a theorem that shows how to lift up definability results for order-invariant logics from the bags of a graph's tree decomposition to the graph itself.
  • We survey an abstract theory of connectivity, based on symmetric submodular set functions. We start by developing Robertson and Seymour's fundamental duality between branch decompositions (related to the better-known tree decompositions) and so-called tangles, which may be viewed as highly connected regions in a connectivity system. We move on to studying canonical decompositions of connectivity systems into their maximal tangles. Last, but not least, we will discuss algorithmic aspect of the theory.
  • Tangles of graphs have been introduced by Robertson and Seymour in the context of their graph minor theory. Tangles may be viewed as describing "k-connected components" of a graph (though in a twisted way). They play an important role in graph minor theory. An interesting aspect of tangles is that they cannot only be defined for graphs, but more generally for arbitrary connectivity functions (that is, integer-valued submodular and symmetric set functions). However, tangles are difficult to deal with algorithmically. To start with, it is unclear how to represent them, because they are families of separations and as such may be exponentially large. Our first contribution is a data structure for representing and accessing all tangles of a graph up to some fixed order. Using this data structure, we can prove an algorithmic version of a very general structure theorem due to Carmesin, Diestel, Harman and Hundertmark (for graphs) and Hundertmark (for arbitrary connectivity functions) that yields a canonical tree decomposition whose parts correspond to the maximal tangles. (This may be viewed as a generalisation of the decomposition of a graph into its 3-connected components.)
  • This paper is a short introduction to the theory of tangles, both in graphs and general connectivity systems. An emphasis is put on the correspondence between tangles of order k and k-connected components. In particular, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the triconnected components of a graph and its tangles of order 3.
  • We introduce a new decomposition of a graphs into quasi-4-connected components, where we call a graph quasi-4-connected if it is 3-connected and it only has separations of order 3 that remove a single vertex. Moreover, we give a cubic time algorithm computing the decomposition of a given graph. Our decomposition into quasi-4-connected components refines the well-known decompositions of graphs into biconnected and triconnected components. We relate our decomposition to Robertson and Seymour's theory of tangles by establishing a correspondence between the quasi-4-connected components of a graph and its tangles of order 4.
  • An assignment of colours to the vertices of a graph is stable if any two vertices of the same colour have identically coloured neighbourhoods. The goal of colour refinement is to find a stable colouring that uses a minimum number of colours. This is a widely used subroutine for graph isomorphism testing algorithms, since any automorphism needs to be colour preserving. We give an $O((m+n)\log n)$ algorithm for finding a canonical version of such a stable colouring, on graphs with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges. We show that no faster algorithm is possible, under some modest assumptions about the type of algorithm, which captures all known colour refinement algorithms.
  • We give an algorithm that, for every fixed k, decides isomorphism of graphs of rank width at most k in polynomial time. As the clique width of a graph is bounded in terms of its rank width, we also obtain a polynomial time isomorphism test for graph classes of bounded clique width.
  • We give a new, simplified and detailed account of the correspondence between levels of the Sherali-Adams relaxation of graph isomorphism and levels of pebble-game equivalence with counting (higher-dimensional Weisfeiler-Lehman colour refinement). The correspondence between basic colour refinement and fractional isomorphism, due to Tinhofer (1986, 1991) and Ramana, Scheinerman and Ullman (1994), is re-interpreted as the base level of Sherali-Adams and generalised to higher levels in this sense by Atserias and Maneva (2012) and Malkin (2014), who prove that the two resulting hierarchies interleave. In carrying this analysis further, we here give (a) a precise characterisation of the level-k Sherali-Adams relaxation in terms of a modified counting pebble game; (b) a variant of the Sherali-Adams levels that precisely match the k-pebble counting game; (c) a proof that the interleaving between these two hierarchies is strict. We also investigate the variation based on boolean arithmetic instead of real/rational arithmetic and obtain analogous correspondences and separations for plain k-pebble equivalence (without counting). Our results are driven by considerably simplified accounts of the underlying combinatorics and linear algebra.
  • We investigate the power of graph isomorphism algorithms based on algebraic reasoning techniques like Gr\"obner basis computation. The idea of these algorithms is to encode two graphs into a system of equations that are satisfiable if and only if if the graphs are isomorphic, and then to (try to) decide satisfiability of the system using, for example, the Gr\"obner basis algorithm. In some cases this can be done in polynomial time, in particular, if the equations admit a bounded degree refutation in an algebraic proof systems such as Nullstellensatz or polynomial calculus. We prove linear lower bounds on the polynomial calculus degree over all fields of characteristic different from 2 and also linear lower bounds for the degree of Positivstellensatz calculus derivations. We compare this approach to recently studied linear and semidefinite programming approaches to isomorphism testing, which are known to be related to the combinatorial Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm. We exactly characterise the power of the Weisfeiler-Lehman algorithm in terms of an algebraic proof system that lies between degree-k Nullstellensatz and degree-k polynomial calculus.
  • We generalize the structure theorem of Robertson and Seymour for graphs excluding a fixed graph $H$ as a minor to graphs excluding $H$ as a topological subgraph. We prove that for a fixed $H$, every graph excluding $H$ as a topological subgraph has a tree decomposition where each part is either "almost embeddable" to a fixed surface or has bounded degree with the exception of a bounded number of vertices. Furthermore, we prove that such a decomposition is computable by an algorithm that is fixed-parameter tractable with parameter $|H|$. We present two algorithmic applications of our structure theorem. To illustrate the mechanics of a "typical" application of the structure theorem, we show that on graphs excluding $H$ as a topological subgraph, Partial Dominating Set (find $k$ vertices whose closed neighborhood has maximum size) can be solved in time $f(H,k)\cdot n^{O(1)}$ time. More significantly, we show that on graphs excluding $H$ as a topological subgraph, Graph Isomorphism can be solved in time $n^{f(H)}$. This result unifies and generalizes two previously known important polynomial-time solvable cases of Graph Isomorphism: bounded-degree graphs and $H$-minor free graphs. The proof of this result needs a generalization of our structure theorem to the context of invariant treelike decomposition.
  • Colour refinement is a basic algorithmic routine for graph isomorphism testing, appearing as a subroutine in almost all practical isomorphism solvers. It partitions the vertices of a graph into "colour classes" in such a way that all vertices in the same colour class have the same number of neighbours in every colour class. Tinhofer (Disc. App. Math., 1991), Ramana, Scheinerman, and Ullman (Disc. Math., 1994) and Godsil (Lin. Alg. and its App., 1997) established a tight correspondence between colour refinement and fractional isomorphisms of graphs, which are solutions to the LP relaxation of a natural ILP formulation of graph isomorphism. We introduce a version of colour refinement for matrices and extend existing quasilinear algorithms for computing the colour classes. Then we generalise the correspondence between colour refinement and fractional automorphisms and develop a theory of fractional automorphisms and isomorphisms of matrices. We apply our results to reduce the dimensions of systems of linear equations and linear programs. Specifically, we show that any given LP L can efficiently be transformed into a (potentially) smaller LP L' whose number of variables and constraints is the number of colour classes of the colour refinement algorithm, applied to a matrix associated with the LP. The transformation is such that we can easily (by a linear mapping) map both feasible and optimal solutions back and forth between the two LPs. We demonstrate empirically that colour refinement can indeed greatly reduce the cost of solving linear programs.
  • We show that the query containment problem for monadic datalog on finite unranked labeled trees can be solved in 2-fold exponential time when (a) considering unordered trees using the axes child and descendant, and when (b) considering ordered trees using the axes firstchild, nextsibling, child, and descendant. When omitting the descendant-axis, we obtain that in both cases the problem is EXPTIME-complete.
  • Nowhere dense graph classes, introduced by Nesetril and Ossona de Mendez, form a large variety of classes of "sparse graphs" including the class of planar graphs, actually all classes with excluded minors, and also bounded degree graphs and graph classes of bounded expansion. We show that deciding properties of graphs definable in first-order logic is fixed-parameter tractable on nowhere dense graph classes. At least for graph classes closed under taking subgraphs, this result is optimal: it was known before that for all classes C of graphs closed under taking subgraphs, if deciding first-order properties of graphs in C is fixed-parameter tractable, then C must be nowhere dense (under a reasonable complexity theoretic assumption). As a by-product, we give an algorithmic construction of sparse neighbourhood covers for nowhere dense graphs. This extends and improves previous constructions of neighbourhood covers for graph classes with excluded minors. At the same time, our construction is considerably simpler than those. Our proofs are based on a new game-theoretic characterisation of nowhere dense graphs that allows for a recursive version of locality-based algorithms on these classes. On the logical side, we prove a "rank-preserving" version of Gaifman's locality theorem.