• In confirmatory clinical trials with small sample sizes, hypothesis tests based on asymptotic distributions are often not valid and exact non-parametric procedures are applied instead. However, the latter are based on discrete test statistics and can become very conservative, even more so, if adjustments for multiple testing as the Bonferroni correction are applied. We propose improved exact multiple testing procedures for the setting where two parallel groups are compared in multiple binary endpoints. Based on the joint conditional distribution of test statistics of Fisher's exact tests, optimal rejection regions for intersection hypotheses tests are constructed. To efficiently search the large space of possible rejection regions, we propose an optimization algorithm based on constrained optimization and integer linear programming. Depending on the optimization objective, the optimal test yields maximal power under a specific alternative, maximal exhaustion of the nominal type I error rate, or the largest possible rejection region controlling the type I error rate. Applying the closed testing principle, we construct optimized multiple testing procedures with strong familywise error rate control. Furthermore, we propose a greedy algorithm for nearly optimal tests, which is computationally more efficient. We numerically compare the unconditional power of the optimized procedure with alternative approaches and illustrate the optimal tests with a clinical trial example in a rare disease.
  • An important objective in the development of targeted therapies is to identify the populations where the treatment under consideration has positive benefit risk balance. We consider pivotal clinical trials, where the efficacy of a treatment is tested in an overall population and/or in a pre-specified subpopulation. Based on a decision theoretic framework we derive optimized trial designs by maximizing utility functions. Features to be optimized include the sample size and the population in which the trial is performed (the full population or the targeted subgroup only) as well as the underlying multiple test procedure. The approach accounts for prior knowledge of the efficacy of the drug in the considered populations using a two dimensional prior distribution. The considered utility functions account for the costs of the clinical trial as well as the expected benefit when demonstrating efficacy in the different subpopulations. We model utility functions from a sponsor's as well as from a public health perspective, reflecting actual civil interests. Examples of optimized trial designs obtained by numerical optimization are presented for both perspectives.
  • BACKGROUND: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard design of clinical research to assess interventions. However, RCTs cannot always be applied for practical or ethical reasons. To investigate the current practices in rare diseases, we review evaluations of therapeutic interventions in paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In particular, we shed light on the endpoints used, the study designs implemented and the statistical methodologies applied. METHODS: We conducted literature searches to identify relevant primary studies. Data on study design, objectives, endpoints, patient characteristics, randomization and masking, type of intervention, control, withdrawals and statistical methodology were extracted from the selected studies. The risk of bias and the quality of the studies were assessed. RESULTS: Twelve (seven) primary studies on paediatric MS (CJD) were included in the qualitative synthesis. No double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial for evaluating interventions in paediatric MS has been published yet. Evidence from one open-label RCT is available. The observational studies are before-after studies or controlled studies. Three of the seven selected studies on CJD are RCTs, of which two received the maximum mark on the Oxford Quality Scale. Four trials are controlled observational studies. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from double-blind RCTs on the efficacy of treatments appears to be variable between rare diseases. With regard to paediatric conditions it remains to be seen what impact regulators will have through e.g., paediatric investigation plans. Overall, there is space for improvement by using innovative trial designs and data analysis techniques.
  • Mid-study design modifications are becoming increasingly accepted in confirmatory clinical trials, so long as appropriate methods are applied such that error rates are controlled. It is therefore unfortunate that the important case of time-to-event endpoints is not easily handled by the standard theory. We analyze current methods that allow design modifications to be based on the full interim data, i.e., not only the observed event times but also secondary endpoint and safety data from patients who are yet to have an event. We show that the final test statistic may ignore a substantial subset of the observed event times. Since it is the data corresponding to the earliest recruited patients that is ignored, this neglect becomes egregious when there is specific interest in learning about long-term survival. An alternative test incorporating all event times is proposed, where a conservative assumption is made in order to guarantee type I error control. We examine the properties of our proposed approach using the example of a clinical trial comparing two cancer therapies.