• Quantum optomechanics uses optical means to generate and manipulate quantum states of motion of mechanical resonators. This provides an intriguing platform for the study of fundamental physics and the development of novel quantum devices. Yet, the challenge of reconstructing and verifying the quantum state of mechanical systems has remained a major roadblock in the field. Here, we present a novel approach that allows for tomographic reconstruction of the quantum state of a mechanical system without the need for extremely high quality optical cavities. We show that, without relying on the usual state transfer presumption between light an mechanics, the full optomechanical Hamiltonian can be exploited to imprint mechanical tomograms on a strong optical coherent pulse, which can then be read out using well-established techniques. Furthermore, with only a small number of measurements, our method can be used to witness nonclassical features of mechanical systems without requiring full tomography. By relaxing the experimental requirements, our technique thus opens a feasible route towards verifying the quantum state of mechanical resonators and their nonclassical behaviour in a wide range of optomechanical systems.
  • Quantum coherence, present whenever a quantum system exists in a superposition of multiple classically distinct states, marks one of the fundamental departures from classical physics. Quantum coherence has recently been investigated rigorously within a resource-theoretic formalism. However, the finer-grained notion of multilevel coherence, which explicitly takes into account the number of superposed classical states, has remained relatively unexplored. A comprehensive analysis of multi-level coherence, which acts as the single-party analogue to multi-partite entanglement, is essential for understanding natural quantum processes as well as for gauging the performance of quantum technologies. Here we develop the theoretical and experimental groundwork for characterizing and quantifying multilevel coherence. We prove that non-trivial levels of purity are required for multilevel coherence, as there is a ball of states around the maximally mixed state that do not exhibit multilevel coherence in any basis. We provide a simple necessary and sufficient analytical criterion to verify multilevel coherence, which leads to a complete classification for three-level systems. We present the robustness of multilevel coherence, a bona fide quantifier which we show to be numerically computable via semidefinite programming and experimentally accessible via multilevel coherence witnesses. We further verify and lower-bound the robustness of multilevel coherence by performing a semi-device-independent phase discrimination task, implemented experimentally with four-level probes in a photonic setup. Our results contribute to understanding the operational relevance of genuine multilevel coherence, also by demonstrating the key role it plays in enhanced phase discrimination---a primitive for quantum communication and metrology---and suggest new ways to reliably test the quantum behaviour of physical systems.
  • Measurements on a single quantum system at different times reveal rich non-classical correlations similar to those observed in spatially separated multi-partite systems. Here we introduce a theory framework that unifies the description of temporal, spatial, and spatio-temporal resources for quantum correlations. We identify, and experimentally demonstrate simple cases where an exact mapping between the domains is possible. We then identify correlation resources in arbitrary situations, where not all spatial quantum states correspond to a process and not all temporal measurements have a spatial analogue. These results provide a starting point for the systematic exploration of multi-point temporal correlations as a powerful resource for quantum information processing.
  • Correlations between spacelike separated measurements on entangled quantum systems are stronger than any classical correlations and are at the heart of numerous quantum technologies. In practice, however, spacelike separation is often not guaranteed and we typically face situations where measurements have an underlying time order. Here we aim to provide a fair comparison of classical and quantum models of temporal correlations on a single particle, as well as timelike-separated correlations on multiple particles. We use a causal modeling approach to show, in theory and experiment, that quantum correlations outperform their classical counterpart when allowed equal, but limited communication resources. This provides a clearer picture of the role of quantum correlations in timelike separated scenarios, which play an important role in foundational and practical aspects of quantum information processing.
  • Entanglement witnesses are invaluable for efficient quantum entanglement certification without the need for expensive quantum state tomography. Yet, standard entanglement witnessing requires multiple measurements and its bounds can be elusive as a result of experimental imperfections. Here we introduce and demonstrate a novel procedure for entanglement detection which seamlessly and easily improves any standard witnessing procedure by using additional available information to tighten the witnessing bounds. Moreover, by relaxing the requirements on the witness operators, our method removes the general need for the difficult task of witness decomposition into local observables. We experimentally demonstrate entanglement detection with our approach using a separable test operator and a simple fixed measurement-device for each agent. Finally we show that the method can be generalized to higher-dimensional and multipartite cases with a complexity that scales linearly with the number of parties.
  • Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein's field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into non-linearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics-essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the non-linear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction, and the influence of decoherence.
  • Quantum mechanics is an outstandingly successful description of nature, underpinning fields from biology through chemistry to physics. At its heart is the quantum wavefunction, the central tool for describing quantum systems. Yet it is still unclear what the wavefunction actually is: does it merely represent our limited knowledge of a system, or is it an element of reality? Recent no-go theorems argued that if there was any underlying reality to start with, the wavefunction must be real. However, that conclusion relied on debatable assumptions, without which a partial knowledge interpretation can be maintained to some extent. A different approach is to impose bounds on the degree to which knowledge interpretations can explain quantum phenomena, such as why we cannot perfectly distinguish non-orthogonal quantum states. Here we experimentally test this approach with single photons. We find that no knowledge interpretation can fully explain the indistinguishability of non-orthogonal quantum states in three and four dimensions. Assuming that some underlying reality exists, our results strengthen the view that the entire wavefunction should be real. The only alternative is to adopt more unorthodox concepts such as backwards-in-time causation, or to completely abandon any notion of objective reality.
  • Quantum correlations can be stronger than anything achieved by classical systems, yet they are not reaching the limit imposed by relativity. The principle of information causality offers a possible explanation for why the world is quantum and why there appear to be no even stronger correlations. Generalizing the no-signaling condition it suggests that the amount of accessible information must not be larger than the amount of transmitted information. Here we study this principle experimentally in the classical, quantum and post-quantum regimes. We simulate correlations that are stronger than allowed by quantum mechanics by exploiting the effect of polarization-dependent loss in a photonic Bell-test experiment. Our method also applies to other fundamental principles and our results highlight the special importance of anisotropic regions of the no-signalling polytope in the study of fundamental principles.
  • We fully characterize the reduced dynamics of an open quantum system initially correlated with its environment. Using a photonic qubit coupled to a simulated environment we tomographically reconstruct a superchannel---a generalised channel that treats preparation procedures as inputs---from measurement of the system alone, despite its coupling to the environment. We introduce novel quantitative measures for determining the strength of initial correlations, and to allow an experiment to be optimised in regards to its environment.
  • Quantum physics constrains the accuracy of joint measurements of incompatible observables. Here we test tight measurement-uncertainty relations using single photons. We implement two independent, idealized uncertainty-estimation methods, the 3-state method and the weak-measurement method, and adapt them to realistic experimental conditions. Exceptional quantum state fidelities of up to 0.99998(6) allow us to verge upon the fundamental limits of measurement uncertainty.
  • Quantum entanglement is widely recognized as one of the key resources for the advantages of quantum information processing, including universal quantum computation, reduction of communication complexity or secret key distribution. However, computational models have been discovered, which consume very little or no entanglement and still can efficiently solve certain problems thought to be classically intractable. The existence of these models suggests that separable or weakly entangled states could be extremely useful tools for quantum information processing as they are much easier to prepare and control even in dissipative environments. It has been proposed that a requirement for useful quantum states is the generation of so-called quantum discord, a measure of non-classical correlations that includes entanglement as a subset. Although a link between quantum discord and few quantum information tasks has been studied, its role in computation speed-up is still open and its operational interpretation remains restricted to only few somewhat contrived situations. Here we show that quantum discord is the optimal resource for the remote quantum state preparation, a variant of the quantum teleportation protocol. Using photonic quantum systems, we explicitly show that the geometric measure of quantum discord is related to the fidelity of this task, which provides an operational meaning. Moreover, we demonstrate that separable states with non-zero quantum discord can outperform entangled states. Therefore, the role of quantum discord might provide fundamental insights for resource-efficient quantum information processing.
  • Systems of linear equations are used to model a wide array of problems in all fields of science and engineering. Recently, it has been shown that quantum computers could solve linear systems exponentially faster than classical computers, making for one of the most promising applications of quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this quantum algorithm by implementing various instances on a photonic quantum computing architecture. Our implementation involves the application of two consecutive entangling gates on the same pair of polarisation-encoded qubits. We realize two separate controlled-NOT gates where the successful operation of the first gate is heralded by a measurement of two ancillary photons. Our work thus demonstrates the implementation of a quantum algorithm with high practical significance as well as an important technological advance which brings us closer to a comprehensive control of photonic quantum information.