• We present a planar qubit design based on a superconducting circuit that we call concentric transmon. While employing a straightforward fabrication process using Al evaporation and lift-off lithography, we observe qubit lifetimes and coherence times in the order of 10us. We systematically characterize loss channels such as incoherent dielectric loss, Purcell decay and radiative losses. The implementation of a gradiometric SQUID loop allows for a fast tuning of the qubit transition frequency and therefore for full tomographic control of the quantum circuit. Due to the large loop size, the presented qubit architecture features a strongly increased magnetic dipole moment as compared to conventional transmon designs. This renders the concentric transmon a promising candidate to establish a site-selective passive direct Z coupling between neighboring qubits, being a pending quest in the field of quantum simulation.
  • We present a method for detecting electromagnetic (EM) modes that couple to a superconducting qubit in a circuit-QED architecture. Based on measurement-induced dephasing, this technique allows the measurement of modes that have a high quality factor (Q) and may be difficult to detect through standard transmission and reflection measurements at the device ports. In this scheme the qubit itself acts as a sensitive phase meter, revealing modes that couple to it through measurements of its coherence time. Such modes are indistinguishable from EM modes that do not couple to the qubit using a vector network analyzer. Moreover, this technique provides useful characterization parameters including the quality factor and the coupling strength of the unwanted resonances. We demonstrate the method for detecting both high-Q coupling resonators in planar devices as well as spurious modes produced by a 3D cavity.
  • The resonator-induced phase (RIP) gate is a multi-qubit entangling gate that allows a high degree of flexibility in qubit frequencies, making it attractive for quantum operations in large-scale architectures. We experimentally realize the RIP gate with four superconducting qubits in a three-dimensional (3D) circuit-quantum electrodynamics architecture, demonstrating high-fidelity controlled-Z (CZ) gates between all possible pairs of qubits from two different 4-qubit devices in pair subspaces. These qubits are arranged within a wide range of frequency detunings, up to as large as 1.8 GHz. We further show a dynamical multi-qubit refocusing scheme in order to isolate out 2-qubit interactions, and combine them to generate a four-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state.
  • We have designed, fabricated and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC current through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor $Q_i> 180,000$. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.
  • We present a superconducting qubit design that is fabricated in a 2D geometry over a superconducting ground plane to enhance the lifetime. The qubit is coupled to a microstrip resonator for readout. The circuit is fabricated on a silicon substrate using low loss, stoichiometric titanium nitride for capacitor pads and small, shadow-evaporated aluminum/aluminum-oxide junctions. We observe qubit relaxation and coherence times ($T_1$ and $T_2$) of 11.7 $\pm$ 0.2 $\mu$s and 8.7 $\pm$ 0.3 $\mu$s, respectively. Calculations show that the proximity of the superconducting plane suppresses the otherwise high radiation loss of the qubit. A significant increase in $T_1$ is projected for a reduced qubit-to-superconducting plane separation.
  • We apply the superconducting proximity effect in TiN/Ti multi-layer films to tune the critical temperature, Tc, to within 10 mK with high uniformity (less than 15 mK spread) across a 75 mm wafer. Reproducible Tc's are obtained from 0.8 - 2.5 K. These films had high resistivities, > 100 uOhm-cm and internal quality factors for resonators in the GHz range on the order of 100k and higher. Both trilayers of TiN/Ti/TiN and thicker superlattice films were prepared, demonstrating a highly controlled process for films over a wide thickness range. Detectors were fabricated and showed single photon resolution at 1550 nm. The high uniformity and controllability coupled with the high quality factor, kinetic inductance, and inertness of TiN make these films ideal for use in frequency multiplexed kinetic inductance detectors and other potential applications such as nanowire detectors, transition edge sensors and associated quantum information applications.
  • The structural and electrical properties of Ti-N films deposited by reactive sputtering depend on their growth parameters, in particular the Ar:N2 gas ratio. We show that the nitrogen percentage changes the crystallographic phase of the film progressively from pure \alpha-Ti, through an \alpha-Ti phase with interstitial nitrogen, to stoichiometric Ti2N, and through a substoichiometric TiNX to stoichiometric TiN. These changes also affect the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, allowing, the superconducting properties to be tailored for specific applications. After decreasing from a Tc of 0.4 K for pure Ti down to below 50 mK at the Ti2N point, the Tc then increases rapidly up to nearly 5 K over a narrow range of nitrogen incorporation. This very sharp increase of Tc makes it difficult to control the properties of the film from wafer-to-wafer as well as across a given wafer to within acceptable margins for device fabrication. Here we show that the nitrogen composition and hence the superconductive properties are related to, and can be determined by, spectroscopic ellipsometry. Therefore, this technique may be used for process control and wafer screening prior to investing time in processing devices.
  • We have investigated the correlation between the microwave loss and patterning method for coplanar waveguide titanium nitride resonators fabricated on Si wafers. Three different methods were investigated: fluorine- and chlorine-based reactive ion etches and an argon-ion mill. At high microwave probe powers the reactive etched resonators showed low internal loss, whereas the ion-milled samples showed dramatically higher loss. At single-photon powers we found that the fluorine-etched resonators exhibited substantially lower loss than the chlorine-etched ones. We interpret the results by use of numerically calculated filling factors and find that the silicon surface exhibits a higher loss when chlorine-etched than when fluorine-etched. We also find from microscopy that re-deposition of silicon onto the photoresist and side walls is the probable cause for the high loss observed for the ion-milled resonators
  • A quantum coherent interface between optical and microwave photons can be used as a basic building block within a future quantum information network. The interface is envisioned as an ensemble of rare-earth ions coupled to a superconducting resonator, allowing for coherent transfer between optical and microwave photons. Towards this end, we have realized a hybrid device coupling a Er$^{3+}$ doped Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal in a superconducting coplanar waveguide cavity. We observe a collective spin coupling of 4 MHz and a spin linewdith of down to 75 MHz.