• We present multiband photometry of 60 spectroscopically-confirmed supernovae (SN): 39 SN II/IIP, 19 IIn, one IIb and one that was originally classified as a IIn but later as a Ibn. Forty-six have only optical photometry, six have only near infrared (NIR) photometry and eight have both optical and NIR. The median redshift of the sample is 0.016. We also present 192 optical spectra for 47 of the 60 SN. All data are publicly available. There are 26 optical and two NIR light curves of SN II/IIP with redshifts z > 0.01, some of which may give rise to useful distances for cosmological applications. All photometry was obtained between 2000 and 2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO), via the 1.2m and 1.3m PAIRITEL telescopes for the optical and NIR, respectively. Each SN was observed in a subset of the $u'UBVRIr'i'JHK_s$ bands. There are a total of 2932 optical and 816 NIR light curve points. Optical spectra were obtained using the FLWO 1.5m Tillinghast telescope with the FAST spectrograph and the MMT Telescope with the Blue Channel Spectrograph. Our photometry is in reasonable agreement with other samples from the literature. Comparison with Pan-STARRS shows that two-thirds of our individual star sequences have weighted-mean V offsets within $\pm$0.02 mag. In comparing our standard-system SN light curves with common Carnegie Supernova Project objects using their color terms, we found that roughly three-quarters have average differences within $\pm$0.04 mag. The data from this work and the literature will provide insight into SN II explosions, help with developing methods for photometric SN classification, and contribute to their use as cosmological distance indicators.
  • Unusually high velocities (< ~0.1c) and correspondingly high kinetic energies have been observed in a subset of Type Ic supernovae (so-called "broad-lined Ic" supernovae; SNe Ic-BL), prompting a search for a central engine model capable of generating such energetic explosions. A clue to the explosion mechanism may lie in the fact that all supernovae that accompany long-duration gamma-ray bursts belong to the SN Ic-BL class. Using a combination of two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics and radiation transport calculations, we demonstrate that the central engine responsible for long gamma-ray bursts can also trigger a SN Ic-BL. We find that a reasonable gamma-ray burst engine injected into a stripped Wolf-Rayet progenitor produces a relativistic jet with energy ~10^51 ergs, as well as a SN whose synthetic light curves and spectra are fully consistent with observed SNe Ic-BL during the photospheric phase. As a result of the jet's asymmetric energy injection, the SN spectra and light curves depend on viewing angle. The impact of viewing angle on the spectrum is particularly pronounced at early times, while the viewing angle dependence for the light curves (~10% variation in bolometric luminosity) persists throughout the photospheric phase.
  • Super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are tremendously luminous explosions whose power sources and progenitors are highly debated. Broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) are the only type of SNe that are connected with long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Studying the spectral similarity and difference between the populations of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe Ic) and of hydrogen-poor stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe, in particular SNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, can provide crucial observations to test predictions of theories based on various power source models and progenitor models. In this paper, we collected all of the published optical spectra of 32 SLSNe Ic, 21 SNe Ic-bl, as well as 17 SNe Ic, quantified their spectral features, constructed average spectra, and compared them in a systematic way using new tools we have developed. We find that SLSNe Ic and SNe Ic-bl, including those connected with GRBs, have comparable widths for their spectral features and average absorption velocities at all phases. Thus, our findings strengthen the connection between SLSNe Ic and GRBs. In particular, SLSNe Ic have average \FeII absorption velocities of $-15,000 +/- 2,600$ \kms~at 10 days after peak, which are higher than those of SNe Ic by $\sim7,000$ \kms~on average. SLSNe Ic also have significantly broader \FeII lines than SNe Ic. Moreover, we find that such high absorption and width velocities of SLSNe Ic may be hard to explain by the interaction model, and none of 13 SLSNe Ic with measured absorption velocities spanning over 10 days has a convincing flat velocity-evolution, which is inconsistent with the magnetar model in one dimension. Lastly, we compare SN 2011kl, the first SN connected with an ultra-long GRB, with the mean spectrum of SLSNe Ic and of SNe Ic-bl.
  • Most types of supernovae (SNe) have yet to be connected with their progenitor stellar systems. Here, we reanalyze the 10-year SN sample collected during 1998-2008 by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to constrain the progenitors of SNe Ia and stripped-envelope SNe (SE SNe, i.e., SNe~IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic). We matched the LOSS galaxy sample with spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and measured SN rates as a function of galaxy stellar mass, specific star formation rate, and oxygen abundance (metallicity). We find significant correlations between the SN rates and all three galaxy properties. The SN Ia correlations are consistent with other measurements, as well as with our previous explanation of these measurements in the form of a combination of the SN Ia delay-time distribution and the correlation between galaxy mass and age. The ratio between the SE SN and SN II rates declines significantly in low-mass galaxies. This rules out single stars as SE~SN progenitors, and is consistent with predictions from binary-system progenitor models. Using well-known galaxy scaling relations, any correlation between the rates and one of the galaxy properties examined here can be expressed as a correlation with the other two. These redundant correlations preclude us from establishing causality - that is, from ascertaining which of the galaxy properties (or their combination) is the physical driver for the difference between the SE SN and SN II rates. We outline several methods that have the potential to overcome this problem in future works.
  • In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses $\lesssim 10^{10}~{\rm M}_\odot$. Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. (2017). We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ~3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about 9 times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ~30\% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.
  • We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volume-limited sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, however, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volume-limited sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify SN 2005io as SN 1987A-like here for the first time), and peculiar subtypes. The relative fractions of Type Ia SNe, Type II SNe, and stripped-envelope SNe in the local universe are not affected, but those of some subtypes are. Most significantly, after discussing the often unclear boundary between SNe Ib and Ic when only noisy spectra are available, we find a higher SN Ib fraction and a lower SN Ic fraction than calculated by Li et al. (2011b): spectroscopically normal SNe Ib occur in the local universe $1.7 \pm 0.9$ times more often than do normal SNe Ic.
  • We compare the diversity of spectral line velocities in a large sample of type IIb supernovae (SNe IIb) with the expected asphericity in the explosion, as measured from the light echoes of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), which was a historical galactic SN IIb. We revisit the results of Rest et al. (2011a), who used light echoes to observe Cas A from multiple lines of sight and hence determine its asphericity, as seen in the velocity of three spectral lines (He I $\lambda$5876, H$\alpha$ and the Ca II NIR triplet). We confirm and improve on this measurement by reproducing the effect of the light echoes in the spectra of several extragalactic SNe IIb found in the literature as well as mean SN IIb spectra recently created by Liu et al. (2016), and comparing these to the observed light echo spectra of Cas A, including their associated uncertainties. In order to quantify the accuracy of this comparison we smooth the light echo spectra of Cas A using Gaussian processes and use a Monte Carlo method to measure the absorption velocities of these three features in the spectra. We then test the hypothesis that the diversity of ejecta velocities seen in SNe IIb can be explained by asphericity. We do this by comparing the range of velocities seen in the different light echoes, and hence different lines of sight, of Cas A to that seen in the population of SNe IIb. We conclude that these two ranges are of the same order and thus asphericity could be enough to explain the diversity in the expansion velocity alone.
  • Using the largest spectroscopic dataset of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (stripped SNe), we present a systematic investigation of spectral properties of Type IIb SNe (SNe IIb), Type Ib SNe (SNe Ib), and Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic). Prior studies have been based on individual objects or small samples. Here, we analyze 227 spectra of 14 SNe IIb, 258 spectra of 21 SNe Ib, and 207 spectra of 17 SNe Ic based on the stripped SN dataset of Modjaz et al. (2014) and other published spectra of individual SNe. Each SN in our sample has a secure spectroscopic ID, a date of $V$-band maximum light, and multiple spectra at different phases. We analyze these spectra as a function of subtype and phase in order to improve the SN identification scheme and constrain the progenitors of different kinds of stripped SNe. By comparing spectra of SNe IIb with those of SNe Ib, we find that the strength of H$\alpha$ can be used to quantitatively differentiate between these two subtypes at all epochs. Moreover, we find a continuum in observational properties between SNe IIb and Ib. We address the question of hidden He in SNe Ic by comparing our observations with predictions from various models that either include hidden He or in which He has been burnt. Our results favor the He-free progenitor models for SNe Ic. Finally, we construct continuum-divided average spectra as a function of subtype and phase to quantify the spectral diversity of the different types of stripped SNe.
  • We present the first systematic investigation of spectral properties of 17 Type Ic Supernovae (SNe Ic), 10 broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) without observed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 11 SNe Ic-bl with GRBs (SN-GRBs) as a function of time in order to probe their explosion conditions and progenitors. We analyze a total of 407 spectra, which were drawn from published spectra of individual SNe as well as from the densely time-sampled spectra data of Modjaz et al. (2014). In order to quantify the diversity of the SN spectra as a function of SN subtype, we construct average spectra of SNe Ic, SNe Ic-bl without GRBs and SNe Ic-bl with GRBs. We find that SN 1994I is not a typical SN Ic, in contrast to common belief, while the spectra of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425 are representative of mean spectra of SNe Ic-bl. We measure the ejecta absorption and width velocities using a new method described here and find that SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, on average, have quantifiably higher absorption velocities, as well as broader line widths than SNe without observed GRBs. In addition, we search for correlations between SN-GRB spectral properties and the energies of their accompanying GRBs. Finally, we show that the absence of clear He lines in optical spectra of SNe Ic-bl, and in particular of SN-GRBs, is not due to them being too smeared out due to the high velocities present in the ejecta. This implies that the progenitor stars of SN-GRBs are probably He-free, in addition to being H-free, which puts strong constraints on the stellar evolutionary paths needed to produce such SN-GRB progenitors at the observed low metallicities.
  • We present the open-source Python code pyMCZ that determines oxygen abundance and its distribution from strong emission lines in the standard metallicity calibrators, based on the original IDL code of Kewley & Dopita (2002) with updates from Kewley & Ellison (2008), and expanded to include more recently developed calibrators. The standard strong-line diagnostics have been used to estimate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium through various emission line ratios in many areas of astrophysics, including galaxy evolution and supernova host galaxy studies. We introduce a Python implementation of these methods that, through Monte Carlo sampling, better characterizes the statistical oxygen abundance confidence region including the effect due to the propagation of observational uncertainties. These uncertainties are likely to dominate the error budget in the case of distant galaxies, hosts of cosmic explosions. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, our code produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 15 metallicity calibrators simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. We test our code on emission line measurements from a sample of nearby supernova host galaxies (z < 0.15) and compare our metallicity results with those from previous methods. Our metallicity estimates are consistent with previous methods but yield smaller statistical uncertainties. Systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. We offer visualization tools to assess the spread of the oxygen abundance in the different calibrators, as well as the shape of the estimated oxygen abundance distribution in each calibrator, and develop robust metrics for determining the appropriate Monte Carlo sample size. The code is open access and open source and can be found at https://github.com/nyusngroup/pyMCZ (Abridged)
  • The progenitors of stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe Ibc) remain to be conclsuively identified, but correlations between SN rates and host-galaxy properties can constrain progenitor models. Here, we present one result from a re-analysis of the rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Galaxies with stellar masses less than $\sim 10^{10}~{\rm M_\odot}$ are less efficient at producing SNe Ibc than more massive galaxies. Any progenitor scenario must seek to explain this new observation.
  • CfAIR2 is a large homogeneously reduced set of near-infrared (NIR) light curves for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) obtained with the 1.3m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope (PAIRITEL). This data set includes 4607 measurements of 94 SN Ia and 4 additional SN Iax observed from 2005-2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. CfAIR2 includes JHKs photometric measurements for 88 normal and 6 spectroscopically peculiar SN Ia in the nearby universe, with a median redshift of z~0.021 for the normal SN Ia. CfAIR2 data span the range from -13 days to +127 days from B-band maximum. More than half of the light curves begin before the time of maximum and the coverage typically contains ~13-18 epochs of observation, depending on the filter. We present extensive tests that verify the fidelity of the CfAIR2 data pipeline, including comparison to the excellent data of the Carnegie Supernova Project. CfAIR2 contributes to a firm local anchor for supernova cosmology studies in the NIR. Because SN Ia are more nearly standard candles in the NIR and are less vulnerable to the vexing problems of extinction by dust, CfAIR2 will help the supernova cosmology community develop more precise and accurate extragalactic distance probes to improve our knowledge of cosmological parameters, including dark energy and its potential time variation.
  • We constructed 70 SuperNova IDentification (SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007) supernova (SN) templates using 640 spectra of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe (SESNe) published by Modjaz et al. (2014). Fifty-six SN templates which are constructed from 458 spectra are brand new, increasing the number of SESNe and the number of SESNe spectra in the current SNID database by a factor of 2.6 and 2.0, respectively. We also made some type and phase refinements to templates in the current SNID database.
  • Using a method to discover and classify supernovae (SNe) in galaxy spectra, we detect 91 Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) and 16 Type II SNe (SNe II) among 740,000 galaxies of all types and 215,000 star-forming galaxies without active galactic nuclei, respectively, in Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Of these SNe, 15 SNe Ia and 8 SNe II are new discoveries reported here for the first time. We use our SN samples to measure SN rates per unit mass as a function of galaxy stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR), as derived by the MPA-JHU Galspec pipeline. We show that correlations between SN Ia and SN II rates per unit mass and galaxy stellar mass, SFR, and sSFR can be explained by a combination of the respective SN delay-time distributions (the distributions of times that elapse between the formation of a stellar population and all ensuing SNe), the ages of the surveyed galaxies, the redshifts at which they are observed, and their star-formation histories. This model was first suggested by Kistler et al. for the SN Ia rate-mass correlation, but is expanded here to SNe II and to correlations with galaxy SFR and sSFR. Finally, we measure a volumetric SN II rate at redshift 0.075 of $R_{\rm II,V} = 0.621^{+0.197}_{-0.154}({\rm stat})^{+0.024}_{-0.063}({\rm sys}) \times 10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$. Assuming that SNe IIP and IIL account for 60 per cent of all core-collapse (CC) SNe, the CC SN rate is $R_{\rm CC,V} = 1.04^{+0.33}_{-0.26}({\rm stat})^{+0.04}_{-0.11}({\rm sys}) \times 10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$.
  • We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust extinction correction methods by asking the following -- does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.
  • Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities (~0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z<0.2) core-collapse SN, including 17 SN Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z<1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with SDSS galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SN Ic-BL and z<1.2 LGRBs have high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities. Core-collapse SN having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SN Ic-BL, unlike those of SN Ib/Ic and SN II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments, and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitors systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for a SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SN Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.
  • We present 645 optical spectra of 73 supernovae (SNe) of Types IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic. All of these types are attributed to the core collapse of massive stars, with varying degrees of intact H and He envelopes before explosion. The SNe in our sample have a mean redshift <cz> = 4200 km/s. Most of these spectra were gathered at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) between 2004 and 2009. For 53 SNe, these are the first published spectra. The data coverage range from mere identification (1-3 spectra) for a few SNe to extensive series of observations (10-30 spectra) that trace the spectral evolution for others, with an average of 9 spectra per SN. For 44 SNe of the 73 SNe presented here, we have well-determined dates of maximum light to determine the phase of each spectrum. Our sample constitutes the most extensive spectral library of stripped-envelope SNe to date. We provide very early coverage (as early as 30 days before V-band max) for photospheric spectra, as well as late-time nebular coverage when the innermost regions of the SNe are visible (as late as 2 years after explosion, while for SN1993J, we have data as late as 11.6 years). This data set has homogeneous observations and reductions that allow us to study the spectroscopic diversity of these classes of stripped SNe and to compare these to SNe associated with gamma-ray bursts. We undertake these matters in follow-up papers.
  • We present our observations of SN 2010mb, a Type Ic SN lacking spectroscopic signatures of H and He. SN 2010mb has a slowly-declining light curve ($\sim600\,$days) that cannot be powered by $^{56}$Ni/$^{56}$Co radioactivity, the common energy source for Type Ic SNe. We detect signatures of interaction with hydrogen-free CSM including a blue quasi-continuum and, uniquely, narrow oxygen emission lines that require high densities ($\sim10^9$cm$^{-3}$). From the observed spectra and light curve we estimate that the amount of material involved in the interaction was $\sim3$M$_{\odot}$. Our observations are in agreement with models of pulsational pair-instability SNe described in the literature.
  • We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our finely sampled light curves show a rise of 0.8mag within 2.5hr. Power-law fits [f(t)\sim(t-t_0)^n] to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out the expected quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic, and its high ejecta velocities (~30,000km/s four days after explosion) are closer to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) than to the observed velocities in normal Type Ic SNe. The high velocities are sustained through the SN early evolution, and are similar to those of GRB-SNe when the SN reach peak magnitude. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 solar mass and a large (5-10E51 erg) kinetic energy, close to the regime of GRB-SN properties. The host-galaxy characteristics are consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts as well, yet this SN does not show the broad lines over extended periods of time that are typical of broad-line Type Ic SNe.
  • Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia show evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well-studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in-depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{\alpha} emission (with widths of ~2000 km/s) and exhibit large H{\alpha}/H{\beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{\alpha} 75-100 d past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 <= M_R <= -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.
  • This document summarizes the results of a community-based discussion of the potential science impact of the Mayall+BigBOSS highly multiplexed multi-object spectroscopic capability. The KPNO Mayall 4m telescope equipped with the DOE- and internationally-funded BigBOSS spectrograph offers one of the most cost-efficient ways of accomplishing many of the pressing scientific goals identified for this decade by the "New Worlds, New Horizons" report. The BigBOSS Key Project will place unprecedented constraints on cosmological parameters related to the expansion history of the universe. With the addition of an open (publicly funded) community access component, the scientific impact of BigBOSS can be extended to many important astrophysical questions related to the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and the IGM. Massive spectroscopy is the critical missing ingredient in numerous ongoing and planned ground- and space-based surveys, and BigBOSS is unique in its ability to provide this to the US community. BigBOSS data from community-led projects will play a vital role in the education and training of students and in maintaining US leadership in these fields of astrophysics. We urge the NSF-AST division to support community science with the BigBOSS multi-object spectrograph through the period of the BigBOSS survey in order to ensure public access to the extraordinary spectroscopic capability.
  • While the connection between Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Type Ib/c Supernovae (SNe Ib/c) from stripped stars has been well-established, one key outstanding question is what conditions and factors lead to each kind of explosion in massive stripped stars. One promising line of attack is to investigate what sets apart SNe Ib/c with GRBs from those without GRBs. Here, I briefly present two observational studies that probe the SN properties and the environmental metallicities of SNe Ib/c (specifically broad-lined SNe Ic) with and without GRBs. I present an analysis of expansion velocities based on published spectra and on the homogeneous spectroscopic CfA data set of over 70 SNe of Types IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-bl, which triples the world supply of well-observed Stripped SNe. Moreover, I demonstrate that a meta-analysis of the three published SN Ib/c metallicity data sets, when including only values at the SN positions to probe natal oxygen abundances, indicates at very high significance that indeed SNe Ic erupt from more metal-rich environments than SNe Ib, while SNe Ic-bl with GRBs still prefer, on average, more metal-poor sites than those without GRBs.
  • In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilising our newly constructed set of SNID spectral templates. These templates allow us to accurately classify our entire dataset, and by doing so we are able to reclassify a handful of objects as bona fide SNe Ia and a few other objects as members of some of the peculiar SN Ia subtypes. In fact, our dataset includes spectra of nearly 90 spectroscopically peculiar SNe Ia. We also present spectroscopic host-galaxy redshifts of some SNe Ia where these values were previously unknown. [Abridged]
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and Type Ib/c Supernovae (SNe Ib/c) are amongst nature's most magnificent explosions. While GRBs launch relativistic jets, SNe Ib/c are core-collapse explosions whose progenitors have been stripped of their hydrogen and helium envelopes. Yet for over a decade, one of the key outstanding questions is which conditions lead to each kind of explosion and death in massive stars. Determining the fates of massive stars is not only a vibrant topic in itself, but also impacts using GRBs as star formation indicators over distances of up to 13 billion light-years and for mapping the chemical enrichment history of the universe. This article reviews a number of comprehensive observational studies that probe the progenitor environments, their metallicities and the explosion geometries of SN with and without GRBs, as well as the emerging field of SN environmental studies. Furthermore, it discusses SN 2008D/XRT 080109 that was discovered serendipitously with the Swift satellite via its X-ray emission from shock breakout, and that has generated great interest amongst both observers and theorists while illustrating a novel technique for stellar forensics. The article concludes with an outlook on how the most promising venues of research - with the existing and upcoming innovative large-scale surveys such as the Palomar Transient Factory and LSST - will shed new light on the diverse deaths of massive stars.
  • Metallicity is expected to influence not only the lives of massive stars but also the outcome of their deaths as supernovae (SNe) and as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, there are surprisingly few direct measurements of the local metallicities of different flavors of core-collapse SNe. Here we present the largest existing set of host-galaxy spectra with H II region emission lines at the sites of 35 stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe. We derive local oxygen abundances in a robust manner in order to constrain the SN Ib/c progenitor population. We obtain spectra at the SN sites, include SNe from targeted and untargeted surveys, and perform the abundance determinatinos using three different oxygen-abundance calibrations. The sites of SNe Ic (the demise of the most heavily stripped stars having lost both the H and He layers) are systematically more metal rich than those of SNe Ib (arising from stars that retained their He layer) in all calibrations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test yields the very low probability of 1% that SN Ib and SN Ic environment abundances, which are different on average by ~0.2 dex (in the Pettini & Pagel scale), are drawn from the same parent population. Broad-lined SNe Ic (without GRBs) occur at metallicities between those of SNe Ib and SNe Ic. Lastly, we find that the host-galaxy central oxygen abundance is not a good indicator of the local SN metallicity; hence, large-scale SN surveys need to obtain local abundance measurements in order to quantify the impact of metallicity on stellar death.