• We establish several upper bounds on the energy-constrained quantum and private capacities of all single-mode phase-insensitive bosonic Gaussian channels. The first upper bound, which we call the "data-processing bound," is the simplest and is obtained by decomposing a phase-insensitive channel as a pure-loss channel followed by a quantum-limited amplifier channel. We prove that the data-processing bound can be at most 1.45 bits larger than a known lower bound on these capacities of the phase-insensitive Gaussian channel. We discuss another data-processing upper bound as well. Two other upper bounds, which we call the "$\varepsilon$-degradable bound" and the "$\varepsilon$-close-degradable bound," are established using the notion of approximate degradability along with energy constraints. We find a strong limitation on any potential superadditivity of the coherent information of any phase-insensitive Gaussian channel in the low-noise regime, as the data-processing bound is very near to a known lower bound in such cases. We also find improved achievable rates of private communication through bosonic thermal channels, by employing coding schemes that make use of displaced thermal states. We end by proving that an optimal Gaussian input state for the energy-constrained, generalized channel divergence of two particular Gaussian channels is the two-mode squeezed vacuum state that saturates the energy constraint. What remains open for several interesting channel divergences, such as the diamond norm or the Renyi channel divergence, is to determine whether, among all input states, a Gaussian state is optimal.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two distant parties to share secret keys with the proven security even in the presence of an eavesdropper with unbounded computational power. Recently, GHz-clock decoy QKD systems have been realized by employing ultrafast optical communication devices. However, security loopholes of high-speed systems have not been fully explored yet. Here we point out a security loophole at the transmitter of the GHz-clock QKD, which is a common problem in high-speed QKD systems using practical band-width limited devices. We experimentally observe the inter-pulse intensity correlation and modulation-pattern dependent intensity deviation in a practical high-speed QKD system. Such correlation violates the assumption of most security theories. We also provide its countermeasure which does not require significant changes of hardware and can generate keys secure over 100 km fiber transmission. Our countermeasure is simple, effective and applicable to wide range of high-speed QKD systems, and thus paves the way to realize ultrafast and security-certified commercial QKD systems.
  • One of the peculiar features in quantum mechanics is that a superposition of macroscopically distinct states can exits. In optical system, this is highlighted by a superposition of coherent states (SCS), i.e. a superposition of classical states. Recently this highly nontrivial quantum state and its variant have been demonstrated experimentally. Here we demonstrate the superposition of coherent states in quantum measurement which is also a key concept in quantum mechanics. More precisely, we propose and implement a projection measurement onto the arbitrary superposition of the SCS bases in optical system. The measurement operators are reconstructed experimentally by a novel quantum detector tomography protocol. Our device is realized by combining the displacement operation and photon counting, well established technologies, and thus has implications in various optical quantum information processing applications.
  • We consider quantum key distribution (QKD) and entanglement distribution using a single-sender multiple-receiver pure-loss bosonic broadcast channel. We determine the unconstrained capacity region for the distillation of bipartite entanglement and secret key between the sender and each receiver, whenever they are allowed arbitrary public classical communication. A practical implication of our result is that the capacity region demonstrated drastically improves upon rates achievable using a naive time-sharing strategy, which has been employed in previously demonstrated network QKD systems. We show a simple example of the broadcast QKD protocol overcoming the limit of the point-to-point strategy. Our result is thus an important step toward opening a new framework of network channel-based quantum communication technology.
  • In the lore of quantum metrology, one often hears (or reads) the following no-go theorem: If you put vacuum into one input port of a balanced Mach-Zehnder Interferometer, then no matter what you put into the other input port, and no matter what your detection scheme, the sensitivity can never be better than the shot noise limit (SNL). Often the proof of this theorem is cited to be in Ref. [C. Caves, Phys. Rev. D 23, 1693 (1981)], but upon further inspection, no such claim is made there. A quantum-Fisher-information-based argument suggestive of this no-go theorem appears in Ref. [M. Lang and C. Caves, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 173601 (2013)], but is not stated in its full generality. Here we thoroughly explore this no-go theorem and give the rigorous statement: the no-go theorem holds whenever the unknown phase shift is split between both arms of the interferometer, but remarkably does not hold when only one arm has the unknown phase shift. In the latter scenario, we provide an explicit measurement strategy that beats the SNL. We also point out that these two scenarios are physically different and correspond to different types of sensing applications.
  • In recent years there has been a great deal of focus on a globe-spanning quantum network, including linked satellites for applications ranging from quantum key distribution to distributed sensors and clocks. In many of these schemes, relativistic transformations may have deleterious effects on the purity of the distributed entangled pairs. This becomes particularly important for the application of distributed clocks. In this paper, we have developed a Lorentz invariant entanglement distribution protocol that completely removes the effects due to the relative motions of the satellites.
  • We report a wavelength division multiplexed time-bin entangled photon pair source in telecom wavelength using a 10 {\mu}m radius Si ring resonator. This compact resonator has two add ports and two drop ports. By pumping one add port by a continuous laser, we demonstrate an efficient generation of two-wavelength division multiplexed time-bin entangled photon pairs in the telecom C-band, which come out of one drop port, and are then split into the signal and idler photons via a wavelength filter. The resonator structure enhances four wave mixing for pair generation. Moreover, we demonstrate the double-port pumping where two counter propagating pump light are injected to generate entanglement from the two drop ports simultaneously. We successfully observe the highly entangled outputs from both two drop ports. Surprisingly, the count rate at each drop port is even increased by twice as that of the single-port pumping. Possible mechanisms of this observation are discussed. Our technique allows for the efficient use of the Si ring resonator, and widens its functionality for variety of applications.
  • We determine a fundamental upper bound on the performance of any adaptive protocol for discrimination or estimation of a channel which has an unknown parameter encoded in the state of its environment. Since our approach relies on the principle of data processing, the bound applies to a variety of discrimination measures, including quantum relative entropy, hypothesis testing relative entropy, R\'enyi relative entropy, fidelity, and quantum Fisher information. We apply the upper bound to thermal (amplifier) channels with a known transmissivity (gain) but unknown excess noise. In these cases, we find that the upper bounds are achievable for several discrimination measures of interest, and the method for doing so is non-adaptive, employing a highly squeezed two-mode vacuum state at the input of each channel use. Estimating the excess noise of a thermal channel is of principal interest for the security of quantum key distribution, in the setting where a fiber-optic cable has a known transmissivity but a tampering eavesdropper alters the excess noise on the channel, so that estimating the excess noise as precisely as possible is desirable. Finally, we outline a practical strategy which can be used to achieve these limits.
  • Quantum digital signatures apply quantum mechanics to the problem of guaranteeing message integrity and non-repudiation with information-theoretical security, which are complementary to the confidentiality realized by quantum key distribution. Previous experimental demonstrations have been limited to transmission distances of less than 5-km of optical fiber in a laboratory setting. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum digital signatures over installed optical fiber as well as the longest transmission link reported to date. This demonstration used a 90-km long differential phase shift quantum key distribution system to achieve approximately one signed bit per second - an increase in the signature generation rate of several orders of magnitude over previous optical fiber demonstrations.
  • NOON state interference (NOON-SI) is a powerful tool to improve the phase sensing precision, and can play an important role in quantum sensing and quantum imaging. However, most of the previous NOON-SI experiments only investigated the center part of the interference pattern, while the full range of the NOON-SI pattern has not yet been well explored.In this Letter, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate up to six-photon NOON-SI and study the properties of the interference patterns over the full range.The multi-photons were generated at a wavelength of 1584 nm from a PPKTP crystal in a parametric down conversion process.It was found that the shape, the coherence time and the visibility of the interference patterns were strongly dependent on the detection schemes.This experiment can be used for applications which are based on the envelope of the NOON-SI pattern, such as quantum spectroscopy and quantum metrology.
  • We consider the phase sensing via weak optical coherent state at quantum limit precision. A new detection scheme for the phase estimation is proposed which is inspired by the suboptimal quantum measurement in coherent optical communication. We theoretically analyze a performance of our detection scheme, which we call the displaced-photon counting, for phase sensing in terms of the Fisher information and show that the displaced-photon counting outperforms the static homodyne and heterodyne detections in wide range of the target phase. The proof-of-principle experiment is performed with linear optics and a superconducting nanowire single photon detector. The result shows that our scheme overcomes the limit of the ideal homodyne measurement even under practical imperfections.
  • Bosonic channels are important in practice as they form a simple model for free-space or fiber-optic communication. Here we consider a single-sender two-receiver pure-loss bosonic broadcast channel and determine the unconstrained capacity region for the distillation of bipartite entanglement and secret key between the sender and each receiver, whenever they are allowed arbitrary public classical communication. We show how the state merging protocol leads to achievable rates in this setting, giving an inner bound on the capacity region. We also evaluate an outer bound on the region by using the relative entropy of entanglement and a `reduction by teleportation' technique. The outer bounds match the inner bounds in the infinite-energy limit, thereby establishing the unconstrained capacity region for such channels. Our result could provide a useful benchmark for implementing a broadcasting of entanglement and secret key through such channels. An important open question relevant to practice is to determine the capacity region in both this setting and the single-sender single-receiver case when there is an energy constraint on the transmitter.
  • We demonstrate a novel scheme to generate frequency-entangled qudits with dimension number higher than 10 and to distribute them over optical fibers of 15 km in total length. This scheme combines the technique of spectral engineering of biphotons generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and the technique of spectrally resolved Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We characterized the comb-like spectral correlation structures of the qudits by time of arrival measurement and correlated spectral intensity measurement. The generation and distribution of the distinct entangled frequency modes may be useful for quantum cryptography, quantum metrology, quantum remote synchronization, as well as fundamental test of stronger violation of local realism.
  • The squashed entanglement of a quantum channel is an additive function of quantum channels, which finds application as an upper bound on the rate at which secret key and entanglement can be generated when using a quantum channel a large number of times in addition to unlimited classical communication. This quantity has led to an upper bound of $\log((1+\eta)/(1-\eta))$ on the capacity of a pure-loss bosonic channel for such a task, where $\eta$ is the average fraction of photons that make it from the input to the output of the channel. The purpose of the present paper is to extend these results beyond the single-sender single-receiver setting to the more general case of a single sender and multiple receivers (a quantum broadcast channel). We employ multipartite generalizations of the squashed entanglement to constrain the rates at which secret key and entanglement can be generated between any subset of the users of such a channel, along the way developing several new properties of these measures. We apply our results to the case of a pure-loss broadcast channel with one sender and two receivers.
  • Device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD) guarantees unconditional security of secret key without making assumptions about the internal workings of the devices used. It does so using the loophole-free violation of a Bell's inequality. The primary challenge in realizing DIQKD in practice is the detection loophole problem that is inherent to photonic tests of Bell's inequalities over lossy channels. We revisit the proposal of Curty and Moroder [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010304(R) (2011)] to use a linear optics-based entanglement-swapping relay (ESR) to counter this problem. We consider realistic models for the entanglement sources and photodetectors; more precisely, (a) polarization-entangled states based on pulsed spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC) sources with infinitely higher order multi-photon components and multimode spectral structure, and (b) on-off photodetectors with non-unit efficiencies and non-zero dark count probabilities. We show that the ESR-based scheme is robust against the above imperfections and enables positive key rates at distances much larger than what is possible otherwise.
  • Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference between independent photon sources (HOMI-IPS) is the fundamental block for quantum information processing, such as quantum gate, Shor's algorithm, Boson sampling, etc. All the previous HOMI-IPS experiments were carried out in time-domain, however, the spectral information during the interference was lost, due to technical difficulties. Here, we investigate the HOMI-IPS in spectral domain using the recently developed fast fiber spectrometer, and demonstrate the spectral distribution during the HOM interference between two heralded single-photon sources, and two thermal sources. This experiment can not only deepen our understanding of HOMI-IPS in the spectral domain, but also be utilized to improve the visibility by post-processing spectral filtering.
  • In spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) based quantum information processing (QIP) experiments, there is a tradeoff between the coincide count rates (i.e. the pumping power of the SPDC), which limits the rate of the protocol, and the visibility of the quantum interference, which limits the quality of the protocol. This tradeoff is mainly caused by the multi-photon pair emissions from the SPDCs. In theory, the problem is how to model the experiments without truncating these multi-photon emissions while including practical imperfections. In this paper, we establish a method to theoretically simulate SPDC based QIPs which fully incorporates the effect of multi-photon emissions and various practical imperfections. The key ingredient in our method is the application of the characteristic function formalism which has been used in continuous variable QIPs. We apply our method to three examples, the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen interference experiments, and the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol. For the first two examples, we show that our theoretical results quantitatively agree with the recent experimental results. Also we provide the closed expressions for these the interference visibilities with the full multi-photon components and various imperfections. For the last example, we provide the general theoretical form of the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol in our method and show the numerical results up to 5 concatenations. Our method requires only a small computation resource (few minutes by a commercially available computer) which was not possible by the previous theoretical approach. Our method will have applications in a wide range of SPDC based QIP protocols with high accuracy and a reasonable computation resource.
  • Since 1984, various optical quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols have been proposed and examined. In all of them, the rate of secret key generation decays exponentially with distance. A natural and fundamental question is then whether there are yet-to-be discovered optical QKD protocols (without quantum repeaters) that could circumvent this rate-distance tradeoff. This paper provides a major step towards answering this question. We show that the secret-key-agreement capacity of a lossy and noisy optical channel assisted by unlimited two-way public classical communication is limited by an upper bound that is solely a function of the channel loss, regardless of how much optical power the protocol may use. Our result has major implications for understanding the secret-key-agreement capacity of optical channels---a long-standing open problem in optical quantum information theory---and strongly suggests a real need for quantum repeaters to perform QKD at high rates over long distances.
  • Entanglement swapping at telecom wavelengths is at the heart of quantum networking in optical fiber infrastructures. Although entanglement swapping has been demonstrated experimentally so far using various types of entangled photon sources both in near-infrared and telecom wavelength regions, the rate of swapping operation has been too low to be applied to practical quantum protocols, due to limited efficiency of entangled photon sources and photon detectors. Here we demonstrate drastic improvement of the efficiency at telecom wavelength by using two ultra-bright entangled photon sources and four highly efficient superconducting nanowire single photon detectors.We have attained a four-fold coincidence count rate of 108 counts per second, which is three orders higher than the previous experiments at telecom wavelengths. A raw (net) visibility in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between the two independent entangled sources was 73.3 $\pm$ 1.0% (85.1 $\pm$ 0.8%). We performed the teleportation and entanglement swapping, and obtained a fidelity of 76.3% in the swapping test.Our results on the coincidence count rates are comparable with the ones ever recorded in teleportation/swaping and multi-photon entanglement generation experiments at around 800\,nm wavelengths. Our setup opens the way to practical implementation of device-independent quantum key distribution and its distance extension by the entanglement swapping as well as multi-photon entangled state generation in telecom band infrastructures with both space and fiber links.
  • Efficient generation and detection of indistinguishable twin photons are at the core of quantum information and communications technology (Q-ICT). These photons are conventionally generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC), which is a probabilistic process, and hence occurs at a limited rate, which restricts wider applications of Q-ICT. To increase the rate, one had to excite SPDC by higher pump power, while it inevitably produced more unwanted multi-photon components, harmfully degrading quantum interference visibility.Here we solve this problem by using recently developed 10 GHz repetition-rate-tunable comb laser, combined with a group-velocity-matched nonlinear crystal, and superconducting nanowire single photon detectors. They operate at telecom wavelengths more efficiently with less noises than conventional schemes, those typically operate at visible and near infrared wavelengths generated by a 76 MHz Ti Sapphire laser and detected by Si detectors. We could show high interference visibilities, which are free from the pump-power induced degradation. Our laser, nonlinear crystal, and detectors constitute a powerful tool box, which will pave a way to implementing quantum photonics circuits with variety of good and low-cost telecom components, and will eventually realize scalable Q-ICT in optical infra-structures.
  • Laser-light (coherent-state) modulation is sufficient to achieve the ultimate (Holevo) capacity of classical communication over a lossy and noisy optical channel, but requires a receiver that jointly detects long modulated codewords with highly nonlinear quantum operations, which are near-impossible to realize using current technology. We analyze the capacity of the lossy-noisy optical channel when the transmitter uses coherent state modulation but the receiver is restricted to a general quantum-limited Gaussian receiver, i.e., one that may involve arbitrary combinations of Gaussian operations (passive linear optics: beamsplitters and phase-shifters, second order nonlinear optics (or active linear optics): squeezers, along with homodyne or heterodyne detection measurements) and any amount of classical feedforward within the receiver. Under these assumptions, we show that the Gaussian receiver that attains the maximum mutual information is either homodyne detection, heterodyne detection, or time sharing between the two, depending upon the received power level. In other words, our result shows that to exceed the theoretical limit of conventional coherent optical communications, one has to incorporate non-Gaussian, i.e., third or higher-order nonlinear operations in the receiver. Finally we compare our Gaussian receiver limit with experimentally feasible non-Gaussian receivers and show that in the regime of low received photon flux, it is possible to overcome the Gaussian receiver limit by relatively simple non-Gaussian receivers based on photon counting.
  • This paper defines the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel as the maximum squashed entanglement that can be registered by a sender and receiver at the input and output of a quantum channel, respectively. A new subadditivity inequality for the original squashed entanglement measure of Christandl and Winter leads to the conclusion that the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel is an additive function of a tensor product of any two quantum channels. More importantly, this new subadditivity inequality, along with prior results of Christandl, Winter, et al., establishes the squashed entanglement of a quantum channel as an upper bound on the quantum communication capacity of any channel assisted by unlimited forward and backward classical communication. A similar proof establishes this quantity as an upper bound on the private capacity of a quantum channel assisted by unlimited forward and backward public classical communication. This latter result is relevant as a limitation on rates achievable in quantum key distribution. As an important application, we determine that these capacities can never exceed log((1+eta)/(1-eta)) for a pure-loss bosonic channel for which a fraction eta of the input photons make it to the output on average. The best known lower bound on these capacities is equal to log(1/(1-eta)). Thus, in the high-loss regime for which eta << 1, this new upper bound demonstrates that the protocols corresponding to the above lower bound are nearly optimal.
  • The locking effect is a phenomenon which is unique to quantum information theory and represents one of the strongest separations between the classical and quantum theories of information. The Fawzi-Hayden-Sen (FHS) locking protocol harnesses this effect in a cryptographic context, whereby one party can encode n bits into n qubits while using only a constant-size secret key. The encoded message is then secure against any measurement that an eavesdropper could perform in an attempt to recover the message, but the protocol does not necessarily meet the composability requirements needed in quantum key distribution applications. In any case, the locking effect represents an extreme violation of Shannon's classical theorem, which states that information-theoretic security holds in the classical case if and only if the secret key is the same size as the message. Given this intriguing phenomenon, it is of practical interest to study the effect in the presence of noise, which can occur in the systems of both the legitimate receiver and the eavesdropper. This paper formally defines the locking capacity of a quantum channel as the maximum amount of locked information that can be reliably transmitted to a legitimate receiver by exploiting many independent uses of a quantum channel and an amount of secret key sublinear in the number of channel uses. We provide general operational bounds on the locking capacity in terms of other well-known capacities from quantum Shannon theory. We also study the important case of bosonic channels, finding limitations on these channels' locking capacity when coherent-state encodings are employed and particular locking protocols for these channels that might be physically implementable.
  • Broadband light sources play essential roles in diverse fields, such as high-capacity optical communications, optical coherence tomography, optical spectroscopy, and spectrograph calibration. Though an ultrabroadband nonclassical state from standard spontaneous parametric down-conversion may serve as a quantum counterpart, its detection and quantum characterization have been a challenging task. Here we demonstrate the quantitative characterization of a multimode structure in such an ultrabroadband (150 nm FWHM) squeezed state at telecom wavelength (1.5 \mu m). The nonclassical photon distribution of our highly multimode state is directly observed using a superconducting transition-edge sensor. From the observed photon correlation functions, we show that several tens of different squeezers are coexisting in the same spatial mode. We anticipate our results and technique open up a new possibility to generate and characterize nonclassical light sources for a large-scale optical quantum network in the frequency domain.
  • We propose quantum receivers with optical squeezing and photon-number-resolving detector (PNRD) for the near-optimal discrimination of quaternary phase-shift-keyed coherent state signals. The basic scheme is similar to the previous proposals (e.g. Phys. Rev. A 84, 042328 (2012)) in which displacement operations, on-off detectors, and electrical feedforward operations were used. Here we study two types of receivers where one installs optical squeezings and the other uses PNRDs instead of on-off detectors. We show that both receivers can attain lower error rates than that by the previous scheme and in particular, the PNRD based receiver has a significant gain under the fixed number of feedfoward steps. Moreover, we show that the PNRD based receiver can suppress the errors due to dark counts, which is not possible by the on-off detector based receiver with a limited number of feedforwards.