• By studying the coarsening dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model in a superfluid regime, we analytically find an unconventional universal dynamical scaling for the growth of the spin correlation length, which is characterized by the exponential integral unlike the conventional power-law or simple logarithmic behavior, and numerically confirmed with the truncated Wigner approximation.
  • We numerically study the unitary time evolution of a nonintegrable model of hard-core bosons with an extensive number of local Z2 symmetries. We find that the expectation values of local observables in the stationary state are described better by the generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE) than by the canonical ensemble. We also find that the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis fails for the entire spectrum, but holds true within each symmetry sector, which justifies the GGE. In contrast, if the model has only one global Z2 symmetry or a size-independent number of local Z2 symmetries, we find that the stationary state is described by the canonical ensemble. Thus, the GGE is necessary to describe the stationary state even in a nonintegrable system if it has an extensive number of local symmetries.
  • We unveil the stable $(d+1)$-dimensional topological structures underlying the quench dynamics for all the Altland-Zirnbauer classes in $d=1$ dimension, and propose to detect such dynamical topology from the time evolution of entanglement spectra. Focusing on systems in classes BDI and D, we find crossings in single-particle entanglement spectra for quantum quenches between different symmetry-protected topological phases. The entanglement-spectrum crossings are shown to be stable against symmetry-preserving disorder and faithfully reflect both $\mathbb{Z}$ (class BDI) and $\mathbb{Z}_2$ (class D) topological characterizations. As a byproduct, we unravel the topological origin of the global degeneracies emerging temporarily in the many-body entanglement spectrum in the quench dynamics of the transverse-field Ising model. These findings can experimentally be tested in ultracold atoms and trapped ions with the help of cutting-edge tomography for quantum many-body states. Our work paves the way towards a systematic understanding of the role of topology in quench dynamics.
  • A generalized Mermin-Ho relation for a spin-1 BEC is derived, which is applicable to vortices regardless of the symmetry and spin polarization of the order parameter. The obtained relation implies an su(3) mass-current circulation and two classes of vortices corresponding to two different su(2) subalgebras.
  • Topological phases of matter have widely been explored in equilibrium closed systems, but richer properties appear in nonequilibrium open systems that are effectively described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. While several properties unique to non-Hermitian topological systems were uncovered, the fundamental role of symmetry in non-Hermitian physics has yet to be understood. In particular, it has remained unclear whether symmetry protects non-Hermitian topological phases. Here we show that time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries are topologically equivalent in the complex energy plane and hence unified in non-Hermitian physics. A striking consequence of this symmetry unification is the emergence of nonequilibrium topological phases that are absent in Hermitian systems and hence unique to non-Hermitian systems. We illustrate this by presenting a non-Hermitian counterpart of the Majorana chain in an insulator with time-reversal symmetry and that of the quantum spin Hall insulator in a superconductor with particle-hole symmetry. Our work establishes the fundamental symmetry principle in non-Hermitian physics and paves the way toward a unified framework for nonequilibrium topological phases of matter.
  • The approach to thermal equilibrium, or thermalization, in isolated quantum systems is among the most fundamental problems in statistical physics. Recent theoretical studies have revealed that thermalization in isolated quantum systems has several remarkable features, which emerge from quantum entanglement and are quite distinct from those in classical systems. Experimentally, well isolated and highly controllable ultracold quantum gases offer an ideal system to study the nonequilibrium dynamics in isolated quantum systems, triggering intensive recent theoretical endeavors on this fundamental subject. Besides thermalization, many isolated quantum systems show intriguing behavior in relaxation processes, especially prethermalization. Prethermalization occurs when there is a clear separation in relevant time scales and has several different physical origins depending on individual systems. In this review, we overview theoretical approaches to the problems of thermalization and prethermalization.
  • The ability to measure single quanta has allowed complete characterization of small quantum systems such as quantum dots in terms of statistics of detected signals known as full-counting statistics. Quantum gas microscopy enables one to observe many-body systems at the single-atom precision. We extend the idea of full-counting statistics to nonequilibrium open many-particle dynamics and apply it to discuss the quench dynamics. By way of illustration, we consider an exactly solvable model to demonstrate the emergence of unique phenomena such as nonlocal and chiral propagation of correlations, leading to a concomitant oscillatory entanglement growth. We find that correlations can propagate beyond the conventional maximal speed, known as the Lieb-Robinson bound, at the cost of probabilistic nature of quantum measurement. These features become most prominent at the real-to-complex spectrum transition point of an underlying parity-time-symmetric effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. A possible experimental realization with quantum gas microscopy is discussed.
  • Recent advances in experimental techniques allow one to measure and control systems at the level of single molecules and atoms. Here gaining information about fluctuating thermodynamic quantities is crucial for understanding nonequilibrium thermodynamic behavior of small systems. To achieve this aim, stochastic thermodynamics offers a theoretical framework, and nonequilibrium equalities such as Jarzynski equality and fluctuation theorems provides the key information about the fluctuating thermodynamic quantities. We review the recent progress in quantum fluctuation theorems, including the studies of Maxwell's demon which plays a crucial role in connecting thermodynamics and information.
  • Understanding irreversibility in macrophysics from reversible microphysics has been the holy grail in statistical physics ever since the mid-19th century. Here the central question concerns the arrow of time, which boils down to deriving macroscopic emergent irreversibility from microscopic reversible equations of motion. As suggested by Boltzmann, this irreversibility amounts to improbability (rather than impossibility) of the second-law-violating events. Later studies suggest that this improbability arises from a fractal attractor which is dynamically generated in phase space in reversible dissipative systems. However, the same mechanism seems inapplicable to reversible conservative systems, since a zero-volume fractal attractor is incompatible with the nonzero phase-space volume, which is a constant of motion due to the Liouville theorem. Here we demonstrate that in a Hamiltonian system the fractal scaling emerges transiently over an intermediate length scale. Notably, this transient fractality is unveiled by invoking the Loschmidt demon with an imperfect accuracy. Moreover, we show that irreversibility from the fractality can be evaluated by means of information theory and the fluctuation theorem. The fractality provides a unified understanding of emergent irreversibility over an intermediate time scale regardless of whether the underlying reversible dynamics is dissipative or conservative.
  • The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), which dictates that all diagonal matrix elements within a small energy shell be almost equal, is a major candidate to explain thermalization in isolated quantum systems. According to the typicality argument, the maximum variations of such matrix elements should decrease exponentially with increasing the size of the system, which implies the ETH. We show, however, that the typicality argument does not apply to most few-body observables for few-body Hamiltonians when the width of the energy shell decreases at most polynomially with increasing the size of the system.
  • Recent experimental advances in controlling dissipation have brought about unprecedented flexibility in engineering non-Hermitian Hamiltonians in open classical and quantum systems. A particular interest centers on the topological properties of non-Hermitian systems, which exhibit unique phases with no Hermitian counterparts. However, no systematic understanding in analogy with the periodic table of topological insulators and superconductors has been achieved. In this paper, we develop a coherent framework of topological phases of non-Hermitian systems. After elucidating the physical meaning and the mathematical definition of non-Hermitian topological phases, we start with one-dimensional lattices, which exhibit topological phases with no Hermitian counterparts and are found to be characterized by an integer topological winding number even with no symmetry constraint, reminiscent of the quantum Hall insulator in Hermitian systems. A system with a nonzero winding number, which is experimentally measurable from the wave-packet dynamics, is shown to be robust against disorder, a phenomenon observed in the Hatano-Nelson model with asymmetric hopping amplitudes. We also unveil a novel bulk-edge correspondence that features an infinite number of (quasi-)edge modes. We then apply the K-theory to systematically classify all the non-Hermitian topological phases in the Altland-Zirnbauer classes in all dimensions. The obtained periodic table unifies time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, leading to highly nontrivial predictions such as the absence of non-Hermitian topological phases in two dimensions. We provide concrete examples for all the nontrivial non-Hermitian AZ classes in zero and one dimensions. In particular, we identify a Z2 topological index for arbitrary quantum channels. Our work lays the cornerstone for a unified understanding of the role of topology in non-Hermitian systems.
  • We investigate continuous dispersive measurements of the number of interacting fermionic atoms in an optical cavity. We derive closed expressions for the noise spectral density and the heating rate due to measurement back-action in the weak-measurement limit, and show that in experimentally relevant regimes they are both universally expressed in terms of Tan's contact. We propose an experimental scheme for real-time continuous probes of current and current noise in mesoscopic structures in a two-terminal setup, and show that the direct measurement of the atomic current shot noise over a single realization of the experiment is achievable.
  • We prove a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem for a certain class of out-of-time-ordered correlators (OTOCs) with a modified statistical average, which we call bipartite OTOCs, for general quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. The difference between the bipartite and physical OTOCs defined by the usual statistical average is quantified by a measure of quantum fluctuations known as the Wigner-Yanase skew information. Within this difference, the theorem describes a universal relation between chaotic behavior in quantum systems and a nonlinear-response function that involves a time-reversed process. We show that the theorem can be generalized to higher-order $n$-partite OTOCs as well as in the form of generalized covariance.
  • Estimation of multiple parameters in an unknown Hamiltonian is investigated. We present upper and lower bounds on the time required to complete the estimation within a prescribed tolerance $\delta$. The lower bound is given on the basis of the Cram\'er-Rao inequality, where the quantum Fisher information is bounded by the squared evolution time. The upper bound is obtained by an explicit construction of estimation procedures. By comparing the cases with different numbers of Hamiltonian channels, we also find that the few-channel procedure with adaptive feedback and the many-channel procedure with entanglement are equivalent in that they require the same amount of time resource up to a constant factor.
  • A topological superconducting wire with balanced gain and loss is shown to possess two distinct types of unconventional edge modes, those with complex energies and nonorthogonal Majorana zero modes. The latter edge modes cause a nonlocal transport with currents being localized at the edges and absent in the bulk as a result of the interplay between parity-time symmetry and topology.
  • Discrete time crystals are a recently proposed and experimentally observed out-of-equilibrium dynamical phase of Floquet systems, where the stroboscopic evolution of a local observable repeats itself at an integer multiple of the driving period. We address this issue in a driven-dissipative setup, focusing on the modulated open Dicke model, which can be implemented by cavity or circuit QED systems. In the thermodynamic limit, we employ semiclassical approaches and find rich dynamical phases on top of the discrete time-crystalline order. In a deep quantum regime with few qubits, we find clear signatures of a transient discrete time-crystalline behavior, which is absent in the isolated counterpart. We establish a phenomenology of dissipative discrete time crystals by generalizing the Landau theory of phase transitions to Floquet open systems.
  • Thermodynamics of quantum coherence has attracted growing attention recently, where the thermodynamic advantage of quantum superposition is characterized in terms of quantum thermodynamics. We investigate thermodynamic effects of quantum coherent driving in the context of the fluctuation theorem. We adopt a quantum-trajectory approach to investigate open quantum systems under feedback control. In these systems, the measurement backaction in the forward process plays a key role, and therefore the corresponding time-reversed quantum measurement and post-selection must be considered in the backward process in sharp contrast to the classical case. The state reduction associated with quantum measurement, in general, creates a zero-probability region in the space of quantum trajectories of the forward process, which causes singularly strong irreversibility with divergent entropy production (i.e., absolute irreversibility) and hence makes the ordinary fluctuation theorem break down. In the classical case, the error-free measurement ordinarily leads to absolute irreversibility because the measurement restricts classical paths to the region compatible with the measurement outcome. In contrast, in open quantum systems, absolute irreversibility is suppressed even in the presence of the projective measurement due to those quantum rare events that go through the classically forbidden region with the aid of quantum coherent driving. This suppression of absolute irreversibility exemplifies the thermodynamic advantage of quantum coherent driving. Absolute irreversibility is shown to emerge in the absence of coherent driving after the measurement, especially in systems under time-delayed feedback control. We show that absolute irreversibility is mitigated by increasing the duration of quantum coherent driving or decreasing the delay time of feedback control.
  • Prethermalization refers to the relaxation to a quasi-stationary state before reaching thermal equilibrium. Recently, it is found that not only local conserved quantities but also entanglement plays a key role in a special type of prethermalization, called entanglement prethermalization. Here, we show that in the Tomonaga-Luttinger model the entanglement prethermalization can also be explained by the conventional prethermalization of two independent subsystems without entanglement. Moreover, it is argued that prethermalization in the Tomonaga-Luttinger model is essentially different from entanglement prethermalization in the Lieb-Liniger model because of the different types of energy degeneracies.
  • By studying the zero-temperature and nonzero-temperature phase diagrams of the ferromagnetic spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model under an external magnetic field, we find that the competition between ferromagnetism and the quadratic Zeeman energy yields two superfluid phases, which feature discontinuous first-order phase transitions between them for a strongly spinor Bose gas such as ${}^7$Li, contrary to the corresponding continuum system.
  • It has been conjectured by Maldacena, Shenker, and Stanford [J. High Energy Phys.~08 (2016) 106] that the exponential growth rate of the out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC) $F(t)$ has a universal upper bound $2\pi k_B T/\hbar$. Here we introduce a one-parameter family of out-of-time-ordered correlators $F_\gamma(t)$ ($0\leq\gamma\leq 1$), which has as good properties as $F(t)$ as a regularization of the out-of-time-ordered part of the squared commutator $\langle [A(t), B(0)]^2\rangle$ that diagnoses quantum many-body chaos, and coincides with $F(t)$ at $\gamma=1/2$. We rigorously prove that if $F_\gamma(t)$ shows a transient exponential growth for all $\gamma$ in $0\leq\gamma\leq 1$, that is, if the OTOC shows an exponential growth regardless of the choice of the regularization, then the growth rate $\lambda$ does not depend on the regularization parameter $\gamma$, and satisfies the inequality $\lambda\leq 2\pi k_B T/\hbar$.
  • Synthetic nonconservative systems with parity-time (PT) symmetric gain-loss structures can exhibit unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking that accompanies spectral singularity. Recent studies on PT symmetry in optics and weakly interacting open quantum systems have revealed intriguing physical properties, yet many-body correlations still play no role. Here by extending the idea of PT symmetry to strongly correlated many-body systems, we report that a combination of spectral singularity and quantum criticality yields an exotic universality class which has no counterpart in known critical phenomena. Moreover, we find unconventional low-dimensional quantum criticality, where superfluid correlation is anomalously enhanced owing to non-monotonic renormalization group flows in a PT-symmetry-broken quantum critical phase, in stark contrast to the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless paradigm. Our findings can be experimentally tested in ultracold atoms and predict critical phenomena beyond the Hermitian paradigm of quantum many-body physics.
  • By investigating information flow between a general parity-time (PT) symmetric non-Hermitian system and an environment, we find that the complete information retrieval from the environment can be achieved in the PT-unbroken phase, whereas no information can be retrieved in the PT-broken phase. The PT transition point thus marks the reversible/irreversible criticality of information flow, around which many physical quantities such as the recurrence time and the distinguishability between quantum states exhibit power-law behavior. Moreover, by embedding a PT-symmetric system into a larger Hilbert space in which the entire system obeys unitary dynamics, we reveal that behind the information retrieval lies a hidden entangled partner protected by PT symmetry. Possible experimental situations are discussed.
  • Motivated by a recent experiment in ultracold atoms [ S. Krinner et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A 113, 8144 (2016)], we analyze transport of attractively interacting fermions through a one-dimensional wire near the superfluid transition. We show that in a ballistic regime where the conductance is quantized in the absence of interaction, the conductance is renormalized by superfluid fluctuations in reservoirs. In particular, the particle conductance is strongly enhanced and the plateau is blurred by emergent bosonic pair transport. For spin transport, in addition to the contact resistance the wire itself is resistive, leading to a suppression of the measured spin conductance. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations.
  • A symmetry broken phase of a system with internal degrees of freedom often features a complex order parameter, which generates a rich variety of topological excitations and imposes topological constraints on their interaction (topological influence); yet the very complexity of the order parameter makes it difficult to treat topological excitations and topological influence systematically. To overcome this problem, we develop a general method to calculate homotopy groups and derive decomposition formulas which express homotopy groups of the order parameter manifold $G/H$ in terms of those of the symmetry $G$ of a system and those of the remaining symmetry $H$ of the state. By applying these formulas to general monopoles and three-dimensional skyrmions, we show that their textures are obtained through substitution of the corresponding $\mathfrak{su}(2)$-subalgebra for the $\mathfrak{su}(2)$-spin. We also show that a discrete symmetry of $H$ is necessary for the presence of topological influence and find topological influence on a skyrmion characterized by a non-Abelian permutation group of three elements in the ground state of an SU(3)-Heisenberg model.
  • We show that the quantum Zeno effect gives rise to the Hall effect by tailoring the Hilbert space of a two-dimensional lattice system into a single Bloch band with a nontrivial Berry curvature. Consequently, a wave packet undergoes transverse motion in response to a potential gradient -- a phenomenon we call the Zeno Hall effect to highlight its quantum Zeno origin. The Zeno Hall effect leads to retroreflection at the edge of the system due to an interplay between the band flatness and the nontrivial Berry curvature. We propose an experimental implementation of this effect with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice.