• The asteroid (25143) Itokawa is a target object of the Japanese sample return mission, HAYABUSA. We have observed Itokawa in optical wave- length (R-band) with the 1.05-m Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the 2.24-m telescope of University of Hawaii, and the 1.05-m telescope at the Misato Observatory since 2001. From the analysis of the data, we present the relationship between brightness and the solar phase angle, 6.9 to 87.8 deg. We obtained the absolute magnitude H_R(0) = 19.09+-0.37, and the slope parameter G_R = 0.25 +- 0.29. The rotational period of Itokawa is 12.1324 +- 0.0001 hours.
  • In this study, we numerically investigated the orbital evolution of cometary dust particles, with special consideration of the initial size frequency distribution (SFD) and different evolutionary tracks according to initial orbit and particle shape. We found that close encounters with planets (mostly Jupiter) are the dominating factor determining the orbital evolution of dust particles. Therefore, the lifetimes of cometary dust particles (~250 thousand years) are shorter than the Poynting-Robertson lifetime, and only a small fraction of large cometary dust particles can be transferred into orbits with small values of a. The exceptions are dust particles from 2P/Encke and, potentially, active asteroids that have little interaction with Jupiter. We also found that the effect of dust shape, mass density, and SFD were not critical in the total mass supply rate to the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) cloud complex when these quantities are confined by observations of zodiacal light brightness and SFD around the Earth's orbit. When we incorporate a population of fluffy aggregates discovered in the Earth's stratosphere and the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko within the initial ejection, the initial SFD measured at the comae of comets (67P and 81P/Wild 2) can produce the observed SFD around the Earth's orbit. Considering the above effects, we derived the probability of mutual collisions among dust particles within the IDP cloud for the first time in a direct manner via numerical simulation and concluded that mutual collisions are mostly ignorable.
  • We present a unique and significant polarimetric result regarding the near-Earth asteroid (152679) 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ , which has a very low geometric albedo. From our observations, we find that the linear polarization degrees of 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ are 44.6 $\pm$ 0.5\% in the R$_\mathrm{C}$ band and 44.0 $\pm$ 0.6\% in the V band at a solar phase angle of 81.0\degr. These values are the highest of any known airless body in the solar system (i.e., high-polarization comets, asteroids, and planetary satellites) at similar phase angles. This polarimetric observation is not only the first for primitive asteroids at large phase angles, but also for low-albedo (< 0.1) airless bodies. Based on spectroscopic similarities and polarimetric measurements of materials that have been sorted by size in previous studies, we conjecture that 1998 KU$_\mathrm{2}$ has a highly microporous regolith structure comprising nano-sized carbon grains on the surface.
  • We investigated the physical properties of the comet-like objects 107P/(4015) Wilson--Harrington (4015WH) and P/2006 HR30 (Siding Spring; HR30) by applying a simple thermophysical model (TPM) to the near-infrared spectroscopy and broadband observation data obtained by AKARI satellite of JAXA when they showed no detectable comet-like activity. We selected these two targets since the tendency of thermal inertia to decrease with the size of an asteroid, which has been demonstrated in recent studies, has not been confirmed for comet-like objects. It was found that 4015WH, which was originally discovered as a comet but has not shown comet-like activity since its discovery, has effective size $ D= $ 3.74--4.39 km and geometric albedo $ p_V \approx $ 0.040--0.055 with thermal inertia $ \Gamma = $ 100--250 J m$ ^{-2} $ K$ ^{-1} $ s$ ^{-1/2}$. The corresponding grain size is estimated to 1--3 mm. We also found that HR30, which was observed as a bare cometary nucleus at the time of our observation, have $ D= $ 23.9--27.1 km and $ p_V= $0.035--0.045 with $ \Gamma= $ 250--1,000 J m$ ^{-2} $ K$ ^{-1} $ s$ ^{-1/2}$. We conjecture the pole latitude $ - 20^{\circ} \lesssim \beta_s \lesssim +60^{\circ}$. The results for both targets are consistent with previous studies. Based on the results, we propose that comet-like objects are not clearly distinguishable from asteroidal counterpart on the $ D $--$ \Gamma $ plane.
  • We conducted a polarimetric observation of the fast-rotating near-Earth asteroid (1566) Icarus at large phase (Sun-asteroid-observer's) angles $\alpha$= 57 deg--141deg around the 2015 summer solstice. We found that the maximum values of the linear polarization degree are $P_\mathrm{max}$=7.32$\pm$0.25 % at phase angles of $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$=124$\pm$8 deg in the $V$-band and $P_\mathrm{max}$=7.04$\pm$0.21 % at $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$=124$\pm$6 deg in the $R_\mathrm{C}$-band. Applying the polarimetric slope-albedo empirical law, we derived a geometric albedo of $p_\mathrm{V}$=0.25$\pm$0.02, which is in agreement with that of Q-type taxonomic asteroids. $\alpha_\mathrm{max}$ is unambiguously larger than that of Mercury, the Moon, and another near-Earth S-type asteroid (4179) Toutatis but consistent with laboratory samples with hundreds of microns in size. The combination of the maximum polarization degree and the geometric albedo is in accordance with terrestrial rocks with a diameter of several hundreds of micrometers. The photometric function indicates a large macroscopic roughness. We hypothesize that the unique environment (i.e., the small perihelion distance $q$=0.187 au and a short rotational period of $T_\mathrm{rot}$=2.27 hours) may be attributed to the paucity of small grains on the surface, as indicated on (3200) Phaethon.
  • We report new observations of the active asteroid P/2010 A2 taken when it made its closest approach to the Earth (1.06 au in 2017 January) after its first discovery in 2010. Despite a crucial role of the rotational period in clarifying its ejection mechanism, the rotational property of P/2010 A2 has not yet been studied due to the extreme faintness of this tiny object ($\sim$120 m in diameter). Taking advantage of the best observing geometry since the discovery, we succeed in obtaining the rotational light curve of the largest fragment with Gemini/GMOS-N. We find that (1) the largest fragment has a double-peaked period of $11.36\pm0.02$ hr spinning much slower than its critical spin period; (2) the largest fragment is a highly elongated object ($a/b\geqslant 1.94$) with an effective radius of $61.9^{+16.8}_{-9.2}$ m; (3) the size distribution of the ejecta follows a broken power law (the power indices of the cumulative size distributions of the dust and fragments are $2.5\pm0.1$ and $5.2\pm0.1$, respectively); (4) the mass ratio of the largest fragment to the total ejecta is around 0.8; and (5) the dust cloud morphology is in agreement with the anisotropic ejection model in Kim et al. (2017). These new characteristics of the ejecta obtained in this work are favorable to the impact shattering hypothesis.
  • We revisited a mass ejection phenomenon that occurred in asteroid P/2010 A2 in terms of the dynamical properties of the dust particles and large fragments. We constructed a model assuming anisotropic ejection within a solid cone-shaped jet and succeeded in reproducing the time-variant features in archival observational images over ~3 years from 2010 January to 2012 October. When we assumed that the dust particles and fragments were ejected in the same direction from a point where no object had been detected in any observations, the anisotropic model can explain all of the observations including (i) the unique dust cloud morphology, (ii) the trail surface brightness and (iii) the motions of the fragments. Our results suggest that the original body was shattered by an impact with the specific energy of Q* <~ 350 J/kg, and remnants of slow antipodal ejecta (i.e., anisotropic ejection in our model) were observed as P/2010 A2. The observed quantities are consistent with those obtained through laboratory impact experiments, supporting the idea that the P/2010 A2 event is the first evidence of the impact shattering occurred in the present main asteroid belt.
  • We present initial time-resolved observations of the split comet 332P/Ikeya-Murakami taken using the Hubble Space Telescope. Our images reveal a dust-bathed cluster of fragments receding from their parent nucleus at projected speeds in the range 0.06 to 3.5 m s$^{-1}$ from which we estimate ejection times from October to December 2015. The number of fragments with effective radii $\gtrsim$20 m follows a differential power law with index $\gamma$ = -3.6$\pm$0.6, while smaller fragments are less abundant than expected from an extrapolation of this power-law. We argue that, in addition to losses due to observational selection, torques from anisotropic outgassing are capable of destroying the small fragments by driving them quickly to rotational instability. Specifically, the spin-up times of fragments $\lesssim$20 m in radius are shorter than the time elapsed since ejection from the parent nucleus. The effective radius of the parent nucleus is $r_e \le$ 275 m (geometric albedo 0.04 assumed). This is about seven times smaller than previous estimates and results in a nucleus mass at least 300 times smaller than previously thought. The mass in solid pieces, $2\times10^9$ kg, is about 4% of the mass of the parent nucleus. As a result of its small size, the parent nucleus also has a short spin-up time. Brightness variations in time-resolved nucleus photometry are consistent with rotational instability playing a role in the release of fragments.
  • Multiple outbursts of a Jupiter-family comet, 15P/Finlay, occurred from late 2014 to early 2015. We conducted an observation of the comet after the first outburst and subsequently witnessed another outburst on 2015 January 15.6-15.7. The gas, consisting mostly of C2 and CN, and dust particles expanded at speeds of 1,110 +/- 180 m/s and 570 +/- 40 m/s at a heliocentric distance of 1.0 AU. We estimated the maximum ratio of solar radiation pressure with respect to the solar gravity beta_max = 1.6 +/- 0.2, which is consistent with porous dust particles composed of silicates and organics. We found that 10^8-10^9 kg of dust particles (assumed to be 0.3 micron - 1 mm) were ejected through each outburst. Although the total mass is three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the 17P/Holmes event observed in 2007, the kinetic energy per unit mass (104 J/kg) is equivalent to the estimated values of 17P/Holmes and 332P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami), suggesting that the outbursts were caused by a similar physical mechanism. From a survey of cometary outbursts on the basis of voluntary reports, we conjecture that 15P/Finlay-class outbursts occur >1.5 times annually and inject dust particles from Jupiter-family comets and Encke-type comets into interplanetary space at a rate of ~10 kg/s or more.
  • We performed a monitoring observation of a Jupiter-Family comet, 17P/Holmes, during its 2014 perihelion passage to investigate its secular change in activity. The comet has drawn the attention of astronomers since its historic outburst in 2007, and this occasion was its first perihelion passage since then. We analyzed the obtained data using aperture photometry package and derived the Afrho parameter, a proxy for the dust production rate. We found that Afrho showed asymmetric properties with respect to the perihelion passage: it increased moderately from 100 cm at the heliocentric distance r_h=2.6-3.1 AU to a maximal value of 185 cm at r_h = 2.2 AU (near the perihelion) during the inbound orbit, while dropping rapidly to 35 cm at r_h = 3.2 AU during the outbound orbit. We applied a model for characterizing dust production rates as a function of r_h and found that the fractional active area of the cometary nucleus had dropped from 20%-40% in 2008-2011 (around the aphelion) to 0.1%-0.3% in 2014-2015 (around the perihelion). This result suggests that a dust mantle would have developed rapidly in only one orbital revolution around the sun. Although a minor eruption was observed on UT 2015 January 26 at r_h = 3.0 AU, the areas excavated by the 2007 outburst would be covered with a layer of dust (<~ 10 cm depth) which would be enough to insulate the subsurface ice and to keep the nucleus in a state of low activity.
  • This paper reports a new optical observation of 17P/Holmes one orbital period after the historical outburst event in 2007. We detected not only a common dust tail near the nucleus, but also a long narrow structure that extended along the position angle 274.6+/- 0.1 degree beyond the field of view of the Kiso Wide Field Camera, i.e., >0.2 degree eastward and >2.0 degree westward from the nuclear position. The width of the structure decreased westward with increasing distance from the nucleus. We obtained the total cross section of the long extended structure in the field of view, C= (2.3 +/- 0.5)x10^10 m^2. From the position angle, morphology and the mass, we concluded that the long narrow structure consists of materials ejected during the 2007 outburst. On the basis of the dynamical behavior of dust grains in the solar radiation field, we estimated that the long narrow structure would be composed of 1 mm-1 cm grains having an ejection velocity of >50 m/s. The velocity was more than one order of magnitude faster than that of millimeter - centimeter grains from typical comets around a heliocentric distance rh of 2.5 AU. We considered that sudden sublimation of a large amount of water ice (about 10^30 mol/s) would be responsible for the high ejection velocity. We finally estimated a total mass of M=(4-8)x10^11 kg and a total kinetic energy of E=(1-6)x10^15 J for the 2007 outburst ejecta, which are consistent with those of previous studies that conducted soon after the outburst.
  • We conducted an optical and near-infrared polarimetric observation of the highly dormant Jupiter-Family Comet, 209P/LINEAR. Because of its low activity, we were able to determine the linear polarization degrees of the coma dust particles and nucleus independently, that is $P_n$=30.3$^{+1.3}_{-0.9}$% at $\alpha$=92.2$^\circ$ and $P_n$=31.0$^{+1.0}_{-0.7}$% at $\alpha$=99.5$^\circ$ for the nucleus, and $P_c$=28.8$^{+0.4}_{-0.4}$% at $\alpha$=92.2$^\circ$ and 29.6$^{+0.3}_{-0.3}$% at $\alpha$=99.5$^\circ$ for the coma. We detected no significant variation in $P$ at the phase angle coverage of 92.2$^\circ$-99.5$^\circ$, which may imply that the obtained polarization degrees are nearly at maximum in the phase-polarization curves. By fitting with an empirical function, we obtained the maximum values of linear polarization degrees $P_\mathrm{max}$=30.8% for the nucleus and $P_\mathrm{max}$=29.6% for the dust coma. The $P_\mathrm{max}$ of the dust coma is consistent with those of dust-rich comets. The low geometric albedo of $P_v$=0.05 was derived from the slope-albedo relationship and was associated with high $P_\mathrm{max}$. We examined $P_\mathrm{max}$-albedo relations between asteroids and 209P, and found that the so-called Umov law seems to be applicable on this cometary surface.
  • This study investigates the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) through the optical properties, albedo and spectral gradient, of zodiacal light. The optical properties were compared with those of potential parent bodies in the solar system, which include D-type (as analogue of cometary nuclei), C-type, S-type, X-type, and B-type asteroids. We applied Bayesian inference on the mixture model made from the distribution of these sources, and found that >90% of the interplanetary dust particles originate from comets (or its spectral analogues, D-type asteroids). Although some classes of asteroids (C-type and X-type) may make a moderate contribution, ordinary chondrite-like particles from S-type asteroids occupy a negligible fraction of the interplanetary dust cloud complex. The overall optical properties of the zodiacal light were similar to those of chondritic porous IDPs, supporting the dominance of cometary particles in zodiacal cloud.
  • We report a new observation of the Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR during its 2014 return. The comet is recognized as a dust source of a new meteor shower, the May Camelopardalids. 209P/LINEAR was apparently inactive at a heliocentric distance rh = 1.6 au and showed weak activity at rh < 1.4 au. We found an active region of <0.001% of the entire nuclear surface during the comet's dormant phase. An edge-on image suggests that particles up to 1 cm in size (with an uncertainty of factor 3-5) were ejected following a differential power-law size distribution with index q=-3.25+-0.10. We derived a mass loss rate of 2-10 kg/s during the active phase and a total mass of ~5x10^7 kg during the 2014 return. The ejection terminal velocity of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles was 1-4 m/s, which is comparable to the escape velocity from the nucleus (1.4 m/s). These results imply that such large meteoric particles marginally escaped from the highly dormant comet nucleus via the gas drag force only within a few months of the perihelion passage.
  • We present the results of a search for the reactivation of active asteroid 176P/LINEAR during its 2011 perihelion passage using deep optical observations obtained before, during, and after that perihelion passage. Deep composite images of 176P constructed from data obtained between June 2011 and December 2011 show no visible signs of activity, while photometric measurements of the object during this period also show no significant brightness enhancements similar to that observed for 176P between November 2005 and December 2005 when it was previously observed to be active. An azimuthal search for dust emission likewise reveals no evidence for directed emission (i.e., a tail, as was previously observed for 176P), while a one-dimensional surface brightness profile analysis shows no indication of a spherically symmetric coma at any time in 2011. We conclude that 176P did not in fact exhibit activity in 2011, at least not on the level on which it exhibited activity in 2005, and suggest that this could be due to the devolatization or mantling of the active site responsible for its activity in 2005.
  • We investigated the magnitude-phase relation of (162173) 1999 JU3, a target asteroid for the JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample return mission. We initially employed the international Astronomical Union's H-G formalism but found that it fits less well using a single set of parameters. To improve the inadequate fit, we employed two photometric functions, the Shevchenko and Hapke functions. With the Shevchenko function, we found that the magnitude-phase relation exhibits linear behavior in a wide phase angle range (alpha = 5-75 deg) and shows weak nonlinear opposition brightening at alpha< 5 deg, providing a more reliable absolute magnitude of Hv = 19.25 +- 0.03. The phase slope (0.039 +- 0.001 mag/deg) and opposition effect amplitude (parameterized by the ratio of intensity at alpha=0.3 deg to that at alpha=5 deg, I(0.3)/I(5)=1.31+-0.05) are consistent with those of typical C-type asteroids. We also attempted to determine the parameters for the Hapke model, which are applicable for constructing the surface reflectance map with the Hayabusa 2 onboard cameras. Although we could not constrain the full set of Hapke parameters, we obtained possible values, w=0.041, g=-0.38, B0=1.43, and h=0.050, assuming a surface roughness parameter theta=20 deg. By combining our photometric study with a thermal model of the asteroid (Mueller et al. in preparation), we obtained a geometric albedo of pv = 0.047 +- 0.003, phase integral q = 0.32 +- 0.03, and Bond albedo AB = 0.014 +- 0.002, which are commensurate with the values for common C-type asteroids.
  • We present the results of photometric observations carried out with four small telescopes of the asteroid 4 Vesta in the $B$, $R_{\rm C}$, and $z'$ bands at a minimum phase angle of 0.1 $\timeform{D}$. The magnitudes, reduced to unit distance and zero phase angle, were $M_{B}(1, 1, 0) = 3.83 \pm 0.01, M_{R_{\rm C}}(1, 1, 0) = 2.67 \pm 0.01$, and $M_{z'}(1, 1, 0) = 3.03 \pm 0.01$ mag. The absolute magnitude obtained from the IAU $H$--$G$ function is $\sim$0.1 mag darker than the magnitude at a phase angle of 0$\timeform{D}$ determined from the Shevchenko function and Hapke models with the coherent backscattering effect term. Our photometric measurements allowed us to derive geometric albedos of 0.35 in the $B$ band, 0.41 in the $R_{\rm C}$ band, and 0.31 in the $z'$ bands by using the Hapke model with the coherent backscattering effect term. Using the Hapke model, the porosity of the optically active regolith on Vesta was estimated to be $\rho$ = 0.4--0.7, yielding the bluk density of 0.9--2.0 $\times$ $10^3$ kg $\mathrm{m^{-3}}$. It is evident that the opposition effect for Vesta makes a contribution to not only the shadow-hiding effect, but also the coherent backscattering effect that appears from ca. $1\timeform{D}$. The amplitude of the coherent backscatter opposition effect for Vesta increases with a brightening of reflectance. By comparison with other solar system bodies, we suggest that multiple-scattering on an optically active scale may contribute to the amplitude of the coherent backscatter opposition effect ($B_{C0}$).
  • The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Widefield Infrared Survey for Fe$^+$ (UWIFE) is a 180 deg$^2$ imaging survey of the first Galactic quadrant (7$^{\circ}$ < l < 62$^{\circ}$; |b| < 1.5$^{\circ}$) using a narrow-band filter centered on the [Fe II] 1.644 {\mu}m emission line. The [Fe II] 1.644 {\mu}m emission is a good tracer of dense, shock-excited gas, and the survey will probe violent environments around stars: star-forming regions, evolved stars, and supernova remnants, among others. The UWIFE survey is designed to complement the existing UKIRT Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2; Froebrich et al. 2011). The survey will also complement existing broad-band surveys. The observed images have a nominal 5{\sigma} detection limit of 18.7 mag for point sources, with the median seeing of 0.83". For extended sources, we estimate surface brightness limit of 8.1 x 10$^{-20}$ W m$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ . In this paper, we present the overview and preliminary results of this survey.
  • We investigated the population of asteroids in comet-like orbits using available asteroid size and albedo catalogs of data taken with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, AKARI, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer on the basis of their orbital properties (i.e., the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, TJ, and the aphelion distance, Q). We found that (i) there are 123 asteroids in comet-like orbits by our criteria (i.e., Q < 4.5 AU and TJ < 3), (ii) 80% of them have low albedo, pv < 0.1, consistent with comet nuclei, (iii) low-albedo objects among them have a size distribution shallower than that of active comet nuclei, that is, the power index of the cumulative size distribution of around 1.1, (iv) unexpectedly, a considerable number (i.e., 25 by our criteria) of asteroids in comet-like orbits have high albedo, pv > 0.1. We noticed that such high-albedo objects mostly consist of small (D < 3 km) bodies distributed in near-Earth space (with perihelion distance of q < 1.3 AU). We suggest that such high-albedo, small objects were susceptible to the Yarkovsky effect and drifted into comet-like orbits via chaotic resonances with planets.
  • Short-period comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami, hereafter V1) was discovered visually by two amateur astronomers. The appearance of the comet was peculiar, consisting of an envelope, a spherical coma near the nucleus and a tail extending in the anti-solar direction. We investigated the brightness and the morphological development of the comet by taking optical images with ground-based telescopes. Our observations show that V1 experienced a large-scale explosion between UT 2010 October 31 and November 3. The color of the comet was consistent with the Sun (g'-RC=0.61+-0.20, RC-IC=0.20+-0.20, and B-RC=0.93+-0.25), suggesting that dust particles were responsible for the brightening. We used a dynamical model to understand the peculiar morphology, and found that the envelope consisted of small grains (0.3-1 micron) expanding at a maximum speed of 500+-40 m/s, while the tail and coma were composed of a wider range of dust particle sizes (0.4-570 micron) and expansion speeds 7-390 m/s. The total mass of ejecta is ~5x10^8 kg and kinetic energy ~5x10^12 J. These values are much smaller than in the historic outburst of 17P/Holmes in 2007, but the energy per unit mass (1x10^4 J/kg) is comparable. The energy per unit mass is about 10% of the energy released during the crystallization of amorphous water ice suggesting that crystallization of buried amorphous ice can supply the mass and energy of the outburst ejecta.
  • We present a comparative study of three infrared asteroid surveys based on the size and albedo data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Our study showed that: (i) the total number of asteroids detected with diameter and albedo information with these three surveyors is 138,285, which is largely contributed by WISE; (ii) the diameters and albedos measured by the three surveyors for 1,993 commonly detected asteroids are in good agreement, and within +/-10% in diameter and +/-22% in albedo at 1sigma deviation level. It is true that WISE offers size and albedo of a large fraction (>20%) of known asteroids down to a few km bodies, but we would suggest that the IRAS and AKARI catalogs compensate for larger asteroids up to several hundred km, especially in the main belt region. We discuss the complementarity of these three catalogs in order to facilitate the use of these data sets for characterizing the physical properties of minor planets.
  • We report new observations of the prototype main-belt comet (active asteroid) 133P/Elst-Pizarro taken at high angular resolution using the Hubble Space Telescope. The object has three main components; a) a point-like nucleus, b) a long, narrow antisolar dust tail and c) a short, sunward anti-tail. There is no resolved coma. The nucleus has a mean absolute magnitude H_V = 15.70+/-0.10 and a lightcurve range 0.42 mag., the latter corresponding to projected dimensions 3.6 x 5.4 km (axis ratio 1.5:1), at the previously measured geometric albedo of 0.05+/-0.02. We explored a range of continuous and impulsive emission models to simultaneously fit the measured surface brightness profile, width and position angle of the antisolar tail. Preferred fits invoke protracted emission, over a period of 150 days or less, of dust grains following a differential power-law size distribution with index 3.25 < q < 3.5 and having a wide range of sizes. Ultra-low surface brightness dust projected in the sunward direction is a remnant from emission activity occurring in previous orbits, and consists of the largest (>cm-sized) particles. Ejection velocities of one micron-sized particles are comparable to the ~1.8 m/s gravitational escape speed of the nucleus, while larger particles are released at speeds less than the gravitational escape velocity. The observations are consistent with, but do not prove, a hybrid hypothesis in which mass loss is driven by gas drag from the sublimation of near-surface water ice, but escape is aided by centripetal acceleration from the rotation of the elongated nucleus. No plausible alternative hypothesis has been identified.
  • The Hayabusa spacecraft rendezvoused with its target asteroid 25143 Itokawa in 2005 and brought an asteroidal sample back to the Earth in 2010. The onboard camera, AMICA, took more than 1400 images of Itokawa during the rendezvous phase. It was reported that the AMICA images were severely contaminated by light scatter inside the optics. The effect made it difficult to produce the color maps at longer wavelengths (>800 nm). In this paper, we demonstrate a method to subtract the scattered light by investigating the dim halos of Itokawa and the Moon taken by AMICA during the inflight operation. As the result, we found that the overall data reduction scheme including the scattered light correction enables to recognize ~3% regional differences in the relative reflectance spectra of Itokawa. We confirmed that the color variation in Itokawa was largely attributed to space weathering.
  • We have observed the lightcurves of 13 V-type asteroids ((1933) Tinchen, (2011) Veteraniya, (2508) Alupka, (3657) Ermolova, (3900) Knezevic, (4005) Dyagilev, (4383) Suruga, (4434) Nikulin, (4796) Lewis, (6331) 1992 $\mathrm{FZ_{1}}$, (8645) 1998 TN, (10285) Renemichelsen, and (10320) Reiland). Using these observations we determined the rotational rates of the asteroids, with the exception of Nikulin and Renemichelsen. The distribution of rotational rates of 59 V-type asteroids in the inner main belt, including 29 members of the Vesta family that are regarded as ejecta from the asteroid (4) Vesta, is inconsistent with the best-fit Maxwellian distribution. This inconsistency may be due to the effect of thermal radiation Yarkovsky--O'Keefe--Radzievskii--Paddack (YORP) torques, and implies that the collision event that formed V-type asteroids is sub-billion to several billion years in age.
  • A Jupiter-family comet, 17P/Holmes, underwent outbursts in 1892 and 2007. In particular, the 2007 outburst is known as the greatest outburst over the past century. However, little is known about the activity before the outburst because it was unpredicted. In addition, the time evolution of the nuclear physical status has not been systematically studied. Here we study the activity of 17P/Holmes before and after the 2007 outburst through optical and mid-infrared observations. We found that the nucleus highly depleted its near-surface icy component before but became activated after the 2007 outburst. Assuming a conventional 1-um-sized grain model, we derived a surface fractional active area of 0.58% +- 0.14% before the outburst whereas it was enlarged by a factor of ~50 after the 2007 outburst. We also found that large (>=1 mm) particles could be dominant in the dust tail observed around aphelion. Based on the size of the particles, the dust production rate was >=170 kg/s at the heliocentric distance rh = 4.1 AU, suggesting that the nucleus still held active status around the aphelion passage. The nucleus color was similar to that of the dust particles and average for a Jupiter-family comet but different from most Kuiper Belt objects, implying that the color may be inherent to icy bodies in the solar system. On the basis of these results, we concluded that more than 76 m surface materials were blown off by the 2007 outburst.